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THE 



REGISTEE OF THE VISITORS 



OF 



THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, 



FROM A.D. 1647 TO A.D. 1658. 



EDITED, 

WITH SOME ACCOUNT OF THE STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY DURING 
THE COMMONWEALTH, 

BY 

MONTAGU BURROWS, 

CHICHELE PROFESSOR OF MODERN HISTORY. 




FEINTED FOR THE CAMDEN SOCIETY. 



M.DCCC.LXXXI. 






WESTMINSTER: 

PRINTED BY J. B. NICHOLS AND SONS, 
25, PARLIAMENT STREET. 




14,9; 



[NEW SERIES xxix.] 



COUNCIL OF THE CAMDEN SOCIETY 

FOE THE YEAK 1880-81. 



President, 

THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF VERULAM, F.R.G.S. 

WILLIAM CHAPPELL, ESQ. F.S.A. Treasurer. 

HENRY CHARLES COOTE, ESQ. F.S.A. 

F. W. COSENS, ESQ. F.S.A. 

JAMES E. DOYLE, ESQ. 

JAMES GAIRDNER, ESQ. 

SAMUEL RAWSON GARDINER, ESQ. Director. 

WILLIAM OXENHAM HEWLETT, ESQ. F.S.A. 

ALFRED KINGSTON, ESQ. Secretary 

CHARLES A. J. MASON, ESQ. 

STUART A. MOORE, ESQ. F.S.A. 

FREDERIC OUVRY, ESQ. V.P.S.A. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF POWIS, LL. D 

EVELYN PHILIP SHffiLEY, ESQ. M.A., F.S.A. 

THE REV. W. SPARROW SIMPSON, D.D. F.S.A. 

JAMES SPEDDING, ESQ. 



The COUNCIL of the CAMDEN SOCIETY desire it to be understood 
that they are not answerable for any opinions or observations that 
may appear in the Society's publications; the Editors of the several 
Works being alone responsible for the same. 



PEEFACE. 



THE Kegister of the Visitors of Oxford University appointed 
by the Long Parliament in 1647, and continued, under several 
changes, during most of the period of the Commonwealth, has, it 
need hardly be said, an intrinsic value far beyond that of a mere 
University Register. It affords us an unique opportunity of study- 
ing the principles on which the authorities of the Commonwealth 
acted, of watching in its very origin and secret recesses the struggle 
between the conflicting forces of politics and religion at that remark- 
able period, and of recovering the history of some distinguished 
persons who ought to be better known. 

The question might well be asked, why so important a record has 
never been published before. It has been lying in the Bodleian 
Library for more than two hundred years ; it was largely used by 
Anthony Wood, and afterwards by Walker; various writers have 
expressed a wish that it might be made available for the public. 
The question might be answered in part by asking another. Why 
has not the history of the University of Oxford been undertaken 
since the days of Wood ? Up to his time, owing chiefly to his own 
enormous labours, we are fairly acquainted with that history; but he 
died in 1695; and nothing of the sort, if we except the notes upon 
Wood which have been published by Gutch and Bliss in their 
editions of the great antiquary, has been attempted since. The 
Visitors' Register has only shared in the general neglect. 

Perhaps it may not be out of place here to express a hope that 
even the publication of this series of documents, falling in, as it does, 
in point of time with that of more than one College Register, or 
history of a College, may lead to some step being taken. When 
several rills are flowing in the same direction, they must have a 
tendency to unite. When a few more Colleges have yielded up 

CAMD. soc. b 



VI PREFACE. 

their treasures besides Magdalen, Allsouls. and Exeter to name 
them in order of publication some person or, still better, some 
body of persons, may surely be expected to take up the story where 
Wood left it. Hearne's Diary, recently indexed in the Bodleian, 
will supply valuable materials for an interesting period ; there are 
numerous collections of letters, and various biographies, at hand; 
and there no longer remains the serious difficulty of decyphering 
for this later period documents which require the practised eye of 
the " expert." 

Perhaps also the very fact already mentioned, that Wood drew 
largely from the Visitors' Register, may have operated against its 
publication. The deference paid to Wood has been so great that 
it has been, rather lazily, taken for granted that we may throw 
away the bones from which he has extracted the marrow. But 
any one who takes -sufficient interest in the subject to compare the 
Register with Wood's account of the proceedings registered, will 
see at once the need of having the whole before him. Wood may 
generally be credited with honestly giving such facts as he knows; 
and he even occasionally makes candid admissions when facts tell 
against the views which he most vehemently expresses : but while 
his industry, enterprise, courage, and truthfulness must never be 
forgotten, his readers will very often find themselves obliged to 
distrust his conclusions, to disregard his epithets, and, while they 
retain the outline of his picture, to wash off the whole of the 
colouring. 

If these remarks apply to any period of which Wood wrote, they 
must do so with tenfold force in relation to the times in which he 
himself lived. To write with calm historic judgment of such times 
is proverbially impossible; and Wood was so far from being a philo- 
sopher, that he undisguisedly displays his furious partisanship. He 
had also his share of the coarseness of the age; and the glimpses 
we have lately obtained of him in the letters of Humphrey Prideaux 



PREFACE. Vll 

do not increase our respect for his temper and manner of life. But 
there is a more excusable and still more characteristic ground for 
the bitterness with which he relates the history of the Parlia- 
mentary Visitation. The Great Eebellion, and the Governments 
which intervened before the Eestoration, had broken the thread 
of a great history, and largely added to the difficulty of ascer- 
taining past facts. The truly antiquarian disgust arising from this 
cause can only be fully appreciated by those who have ventured 
into similar regions of research. As the English Kevolution brought 
about the destruction of vast masses of documents, and broke up 
numerous important families, so, when the Restoration came, the 
favourite method of evincing the national feeling was to destroy all 
traces of the intrusion. Wood suffered chiefly from the first dis- 
persion ; subsequent ages from both combined. 

Nor is there any other writer, living anywhere near those times, 
by whose light we may correct false impressions derived from Wood. 
Walker's Sufferings of the Clergy contains some additions to the 
matter obtained from Wood; but the author surpasses his master 
in bitter one-sidedness, and relies even more on the scurrilous 
broadsheets and reckless personalities of those Cavalier scribes whose 
ephemeral productions have little real claim on our respect. 

Lastly, the Visitors 5 Register might, perhaps, before this have 
found an editor, if the distinguished men to whom, it has been pro- 
posed had not been too much occupied to give up the time which 
such a work requires. The present Editor, while most sincerely 
regretting that it has not fallen into abler hands, has endeavoured to 
make it more intelligible by an Introduction and a body of Notes, 
as also by re-arranging the entries in chronological order. This last 
was a harder task than might be supposed. Whatever the merits 
of the Visitors, they certainly did not keep a very strict eye 
over their Registrar, or, as he was then called, their " Register." 
The book is a most disorderly production ; a fact which may be 



viii PREFACE. 

partly accounted for by the irregular pay of the officer, to which we 
find constant reference, and partly by the circumstance that he 
left his work to be done by a deputy. Indeed, there were more 
deputies than one. Mr. Newhouse was appointed by the Visitors, 
at the commencement of their labours in 1647; but the signature 
of Ealph Austen occurs within a few months; and he had been 
preceded for a short time by a Mr. Wells. In January 1650-1, 
the said Austen is stated to have done the duty of Mr. Newhouse, 
" who doth for the most part reside in London, attending upon his 
master," for " nearly three years " before. Even after Austen is 
regularly appointed to the place he had so long filled as deputy, we 
find Elisha Coles doing his duty on one occasion. But Austen, 
having been again appointed by the last body of Visitors, remains 
to the last, and is noted by Wood as having lived on at Oxford 
till 1676, devoting himself to religion and horticulture. On both 
these subjects he wrote; but the merits of the practical treatise on 
gardens being obscured by the demerits of the " Spiritual use of an 
Orchard," which he unadvisedly bound up with it, the fame of the 
author has not survived.* His florid letter to Laud, when Proctor 
in 1630, may be found in the Archbishop's History of his Chan- 
cellorship. 1 ' It was at his death that the Register with which he was 
identified came to the Bodleian Library. There is nothing to show 
how it came there, but it was probably deposited by his executors. 

It is needless to inquire why this valuable document was not 
formally received amongst the University archives, instead of beinw 
placed in the Bodleian. The very proposal would certainly at the 
time have been considered a deadly insult, its acceptance a foul 
desecration: the book would have been burnt. Ralph Austen, or 
his representatives, knew what they were about. Entombed in the 
venerable library it would at least be safe. If not worthy to be 

8 Wood's Fasti, vol. ii. p. 174. 

b Land's Works, yol. v. part i. p. 33: Library of Anglo-Catholic Theology. 



PREFACE. IX 

reckoned a part of the archives of the University, to which indeed 
it had no absolute claim, it might yet reappear as general his- 
tory. The Visitation, too detestable in the reign of Charles the 
Second to be mentioned without a curse, might perhaps in some 
future age receive at least fair play. 

In illustration of these remarks it will be sufficient to quote the 
official entry at the end of the volume of the Register of Convo- 
cation, which contains the records of the University during the same 
period as that covered by the Visitors' Register. This is the Regis- 
trum Convocationis T., used by Wood, and often referred to in the 
Notes accompanying this edition of its sister volume. It has received 
a more respectful treatment than that other document: but its place 
of dignity in the archives was only permissible when duly stigma- 
tized by the following quaint and characteristic excommunication : 
" Evolventes praesens hoc Registrum Venerabilis Domus Convo- 
cationis, quod ab anno 1648 ad annum fere 1660 ejusdem res 
gestas continet, durante tyrannide Parliamentaria, Philippo Comite 
Pembrochise, Olivario et Richardo Cromwelliis, Cancellarium nomine 
sese hie venditantibus, Acta pleraque officio subditorum erga Prin- 
cipem, Scholarium erga Matrem Academiam, famse demum bonae 
et honestati publicae, prorsus repugnantia reperimus. Itaque pro 
jure et potestate nobis hac ex parte per Venerabilem domum Con- 
vocationis Octob. 31. an D ni 1666 concessis, ista omnia prsedicta 
(singulis enim percensendis piget) censurse subjicimus et Damnamus. 
Dat. 25. Jan. JOHAN. FELL: Vice Chan. 
1666 [1666-7.] Ro. SAY: Coll. Oriel Prseposit. 

JACOBUS HYDE : Aulae B. Magd. Princip. 

KEN. DIGBY : E Coll . Omn . Anim. 

N. HODGES : Proc . Sen : Ex Aede X tt 

GUAL. BAYLEY : Proc. Alter : E Coll. Magd. 

JOHANNES PROCTER : e Coll . Exon. 

ROB* HUNTINGTON : e Coll. Merton. 



X PREFACE. 

The original spelling of the Register has been carefully retained 
(the contractions alone being expanded), as well as the original 
marginal notes and paging. The proper spelling of the names which 
occur has been obtained, wherever it was possible, from the Matricu- 
lation Registers and Subscription Books, the Lists of Degrees, and 
the College Registers ; and will be found in the Index of Names. 

On the subject of references it should be mentioned, that, while 
other authors are named, it has not been thought necessary to place 
Anthony Wood's name before the well-known "Annals," " Fasti," 
&c., which contribute so much to our guidance. 

It only remains for the Editor to offer his hearty thanks to all 
those who have assisted him in preparing this edition of the Visitors' 
Register. In every College the Head, or some other competent 
member of it, has proved willing to afford with the greatest kindness 
whatever information was in his power. Their names will be found 
in the Explanatory Preface to the Index of Names, and elsewhere. 
But the Editor must here offer his special thanks to the Rev. C. 
W. Boase, Fellow and Tutor of Exeter College, and the Rev. Dr. 
Bloxam, of Magdalen, whose admirable labours on the Registers of 
their own Colleges have enabled them to contribute more than 
ordinary assistance to the work in hand ; to the Rev. Dr. Ince, 
Regius Professor of Divinity, who has most kindly inspected the 
Introduction ; to the Rev. W. Macray, of the Bodleian ; and to the 
Rev. J. Griffiths, Warden of Wadham and Keeper of the Archives, 
who, having made University documents his particular study, has 
always proved himself ready to assist his fellow labourers. 

NOTE. It may be well to call attention in this place to the correction given in 
the Explanatory Preface to the Index of Names (p. 465), of the estimates of the 
number of Expulsions made in pp. xxvi., Ixxxix., and xc. 



INTRODUCTION. 



CHAPTER I. 

ANTECEDENT OXFORD HISTORY. 

IN one, and that the most obvious, sense, the government of 
Oxford University for fourteen years from the Surrender of the 
City in 1646 to the Eestoration in 1660 stands out distinct from 
all the years of the previous and later centuries, as an interruption, 
an anomaly, a suspension of rights and duties, an isolated period. 
It appears so in the Works of Anthony Wood, in such notices as 
we find in Lord Clarendon's Works and Walker's Sufferings of 
the Ckrgy, as well as in those of modern compilers. Even when 
treated by professed advocates of the Puritans, like Neal, in the 
middle of the last century, it seems much the same. It was the 
government, by a Eepublic or u Commonwealth," of an institu- 
tion of which, from the earliest ages, kings had been the nursing 
fathers and queens the nursing mothers ; and this a Republic 
founded in the sacred blood of a king who had stamped his mark 
on the City and University of Oxford far more distinctly than any 
monarch before or since ; who had made the City his home, his 
central citadel, the members of the University his body-guard, its 
chief divines his Bishops, counsellors, and chaplains; and who, 
issuing from its bulwarks for the last time in his troubled life as a 
free man, went forth only, after a frightful imprisonment, to die. 
When this Government had passed away, amidst the execrations 
of those who had once shouted its welcome, it was succeeded by the 
sovereignty of the monarch whose popularity covered his faults, and 
to whom, as the son of the " Roya! martyr," by the nation gener- 
ally, and most assuredly by Oxford, all offences were forgiven. 
Again, this Government was the triumph of the Nonconformists 



Xll INTRODUCTION. 

over the Church, 3 the Church by which the Universities were not 
only founded, but of which they were an integral part, the very 
centre and defence, the Church of England, whose vicissitudes in 
Medieval and Reformation times, in the phases of Elizabethan and 
Caroline theology alike, they, and especially Oxford, had conspicu- 
ously shared. When this Government was superseded by the 
Restoration of Charles the Second, the Church resumed her sway 
just as if nothing had happened; the Prayer Book once more was 
heard where the Directory had for a time taken its place, and 
priests "duly administered the Word and Sacraments" where 
ministers had lectured and held prayer-meetings; nor has there 
been any substantial breach of continuity since that time. 

And yet, when we candidly reflect upon the circumstances, and 
still more upon the results, of this Visitation, or rather this Visita- 
torial government of the University, we cannot but observe that 
there is something left out of account in regarding it simply as an 
isolated period and anomalous fact. We find ourselves in serious 
difficulty when we deal in this sense with its results; and we cannot 
but ask ourselves whether there may not be some different expla- 
nation of the acts of the Visitors from that given by Wood and his 
followers, some discrimination between the different sections of 
Visitors as they come upon the stage, which might afford a better 
interpretation perhaps some reflected light upon the subject from 
the previous fluctuations of theological opinion, which had affected 
the University before it became what the Visitors found it. It may 
at any rate be of some use to recount a few of these fluctuations, 
and briefly advert to their causes. 

For some three-quarters of a century before the Great Rebellion 
the Universities had been in a very flourishing condition. Ap 
parently reduced and weakened, but really strengthened, by the 
struggles of the Reformation, they no longer possessed a mere share, 
along with the monastic bodies, in the influence exerted upon the 

a They were not so much Dissenters from its constitution as Nonconformists to 
some of its requisitions." Orme's Memoirs of Dr. John Omen, p. 5. 



INTRODUCTION. Xlll 

theology of the clergy and the general education of the people: 
they had absorbed it all. They had themselves, through the rapid 
development of the numerous Colleges which had from the first ex- 
cluded monks and friars, powerfully aided the Reforming movement; 
and had accordingly, amidst the general crash, been on the whole, 
in spite of an occasional attack, sedulously protected in their property 
and privileges. The Tudor Dictators, obeying the instincts of the 
nation in setting themselves free from the yoke of Rome, found 
that they must lean on something more solid than the popular will, 
and the Universities were ready to their hands. 'Henry and 
Edward, each in turn, took care that the Universities should march 
to their tune; and Mary died before she could accomplish any de- 
cisive reaction. However widely the three next monarchs, Eliza- 
beth, James, and Charles, differed in character and circumstances, 
they agreed exactly in one thing, the value they each attached to 
the Universities. 

In these last three reigns the two great " seminaries of religious 
and useful learning " had thus, recovering from the shock of the Re- 
formation, become the leading feature in the national progress. They 
were the representatives of the Reformed Church, the nursery of the 
statesmen, clergy, lawyers, and physicians of the realm. The marks 
of the Reformation struggle were all but obliterated by the Act of 
Incorporation (13 Eliz.), which put an end to many disorders; and 
they rapidly grew rich under the operation of the Statute for the 
u Relief of Commons " which now followed (18 Eliz.) Under that 
Statute came a change of the last importance in their history, though 
probably little suspected at first. Under the obscure expression, 
" one third part at least of the old rent shall be reserved and ex- 
pended to the relief of commons and diet of the said Colleges," 
lurked the whole system, previously almost unknown, and quite 
unrecognized, of regular money allowances to Fellows and Scholars. 
A surplus revenue was now authorized and established in every 
Society, which, under the ruling of successive Visitors, developed 
into a fund regularly divided amongst the members on the Founda- 

CAMD. SOC. C 



XIV INTRODUCTION. 

tion. The process is easily traceable in the history of All Souls' 
College, and in this respect it is probably a type of the rest. 

When the Colleges now existing were founded, the monastic idea, 
in its special, distinctive form, had been rejected as a part of their 
constitution. There had been no vows of poverty, chastity, and 
obedience, nor their equivalents, in the elaborate provisions made 
by Walter de Merton, William of Wykeham, Henry Chichele, and 
the rest. But, as far as the monastic system had formed and sus* 
tained the substantial character and habits of a student, of a clergy- 
man, of a professional man who was also a clergyman, just so far, 
and quite as far, the Colleges reproduced that idea. Their Fellows 
or Scholars were monks of a better kind. They were to live a 
perfectly simple and devout life, under the strictest rules, with 
common meals, and a " livery " provided by the Founder's bequest, 
a common library, strict boundaries for their walks, and a common 
interest in the property of the College, but no money allowance. 
When they began to educate Commoners this strict system still 
pervaded the whole establishment, and it was suitable to the modest 
ideas of the period of the Renaissance. 

But the wealth which it now, in consequence of the Act of 18 
Eliz., became the direct interest of every College to foster and 
increase, and which the growing prosperity of the country made 
more and more considerable, soon effected a decisive change in 
many directions. In the first place it powerfully attracted the 
upper, and the now rapidly-growing middle classes, to the Univer- 
sities; and, in the second place, it gradually altered the whole tone 
of the Colleges and their style of living. The University, in the 
last half of Elizabeth's reign, was a very different institution from 
what it had been in the fifteenth century, or even in the reign of 
Henry the Eighth. 

With all this increase of wealth and popularity, and the security 
produced by royal patronage and regular establishment, came also 
inevitably a corresponding tendency to excess and luxury. Of this 
we find many traces in sumptuary laws and Injunctions of Visitors. 



INTRODUCTION. Xy 

The race of frugal scholars and clergy who introduced the Renais- 
sance and established the Reformation in England had been suc- 
ceeded by a much more various body of University men. Students 
and clergy still indeed flourished ; but there were many rich men 
men of the world, men of a wider and freer scope of mind. On 
these men the fashions of the Court, and the examples of the 
Continent, restrained within bounds by the careful government of 
Elizabeth, had, by the time that the first Stuart sovereign settled 
himself on his English throne, taken serious hold. The general 
change which came over the country in James's reign is so well 
understood and acknowledged that it is enough to make only the 
most ordinary reference to it in this place. Perhaps the famous 
ballad-song of the period, describing the old and the new English 
courtier, on which has been founded the modern " Fine old English 
Gentleman," may be taken as a fair specimen of the change. The 
removal of the strong hand of the great Queen was felt in every 
direction, and in this amongst others. " England was England 
then," said regretful observers in the subsequent age, and the sigh 
was prompted by more, far more, than a mere sentimental attach- 
ment to the past. 

As regards Oxford it is enough to quote Wood's Annals under 
the year 1606. In that year James and his Court paid a visit 
to the University. The author of the Annals tells us it was most 
prejudicial to the morals of the students, especially in relation 
to " that damned sin of drunkenness ; for whereas in the days of 
Queen Elizabeth it was little or nothing practised sack being rather 
then taken for a cordial than a usual liquor, sold also for that pur- 
pose in apothecaries' shops and a heinous crime it was to be over- 
taken with drink or to smoke tobacco, it now became in a manner 
common ; it became a laudable fashion." There are many subse- 
quent indications in Wood's Annals, in Clarendon's Life, and else- 
where, of the prevalence of intemperance, but none more conclusive 
than the multiplication of ale-houses in Oxford, of which some 
notice will be found in a note to the Register (p. 285). 



XVI INTRODUCTION. 

Abuses of a similar kind grew up profusely, such as prodigious 
College feasts and continuous entertainments, open evasion of the 
laws of Academical costume and of statutable restrictions on certain 
objectionable forms of amusement, and disorderly customs as to 
meals in private rooms and taverns, instead of in the College Hall. 
Above all, a system of buying and selling Fellowships, which, though 
most common and scandalous in a few Colleges, was by no means 
confined to them, took regular form and shape. 

It was with this degeneracy that the school of Laud first, and 
that of the so-called " Puritans " afterwards, found themselves 
obliged to deal. What the former school, when it obtained supre- 
macy, did to some extent accomplish, the latter had to begin over 
again in their own different way. The war had intervened, and 
the University had become more demoralised than ever. Both 
systems were so far alike that they recognised the inseparable rela- 
tionship of religion and morality; both looked on the education of 
young men as a hopeless and impossible task except under the con- 
dition of strict discipline, along with religious influences which 
should pervade every portion of University and College life. In 
their end these schools agreed ; in their means they differed : and 
this leads us to the point of view from which we may perhaps 
obtain a more intelligible survey of the position occupied by the 
Visitors of the Commonwealth than was open to those who lived at 
the period, and which is of course closed to those who blindly follow 
their guidance. 

As it would be out of place to enter into theological disquisitions 
in this Introduction, or even into theological history, except as 
strictly bearing on the Visitation, it may be best to note a few land- 
marks which will be easily recognised. 

We may begin with the year 1586, when Wood remarks, that, 
owing to the influence of the Earl of Leicester, who was then Chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, the patron of the Puritans, " the face 
of the University was so much altered that there was but little to 
be seen of the Church of England, according to the principles and 



INTRODUCTION. XVli 

positions upon which it had been reformed." (Annals.) Wood, 
on such a point as this, is by no means a safe guide; but we may 
believe that his report is so far faithful that it represents a con- 
siderable change from the " Establishment " laid down by Elizabeth, 
Cecil, Parker, and Jewell, and defended by Hooker. The Formu- 
laries and Articles had received an interpretation decisively Calvin - 
istic under the teaching of some leading men, especially during 
the long reign of the able Lawrence Humphrey, the Kegius Pro 
fessor of Divinity; and that dignitary, it should be remembered, 
exercised a far more powerful influence in those days than we can 
now easily conceive. As "Moderator" in the Disputations which 
then formed the staple of University training, he laid down the law 
for the schools ; and it was not easy to bring any higher power 
against him. But even Archbishop "Whitgift, stout and orthodox 
champion of the Church as he proved himself, showed a strong 
tendency in this direction : and it would be quite a mistake to sup- 
pose that such opinions necessarily implied what was meant by 
" Puritanism/' when that word is used to express the doctrines and 
practices of the Nonconformists. Such men as Morley, Bishop of 
Winchester, and Barlow, Bishop of Lincoln, were, at a still later 
date, Calvinists. Calvin's enormous influence was felt quite as 
much within the Church as without it, and indeed the idea of 
separation was not as yet entertained by any large body of men. 
It was not till the fatal violence of the Laudian school had been 
fully developed that separation began to present itself as a serious 
duty to masses of Churchmen, and Nonconformity or Dissent, as we 
now know it, to have a history. 

There is every reason to believe that the Calvinistic school at 
Oxford began to assume a much more moderate character soon after 
Humphrey's death. His successors, Holland and Abbot, do not 
seem to have been of the same violent type; still less John Prideaux, 
also a Calvinist, who succeeded them, and whose history is more 
important for this sketch than that of either of the others. Under 
him the traditions of the Elizabethan Establishment were faith- 



xviii INTRODUCTION. 

fully handed down during a long period of twenty-seven years, 
from 1615 to 1642, at which latter date he was raised to the 
Episcopal Bench. For a considerable part of that time he is the 
leading figure in the University. 

A Life of this remarkable man still remains a desideratum. For 
his theology we must go to his sermons, his lectures, and his Manual ; 
they will be found to bear out the general position above assigned 
to him. In the biographical sketches of him contained in Wood, 
in Walker's Sufferings of the Clergy, Prince's Worthies of Devon, 
and Fuller's Worthies, the chief point insisted on is the persecution 
he underwent for the cause of Charles the First, the previous period 
of his life being very vaguely treated ; but the following passages 
will throw some light on that earlier time. " His learning," says 
Walker, " was so very eminent that the Divinity School was scarce 
ever filled with such a constant and numerous auditory as in his 
time. . . , . His moderation [probably in the sense of his ruling 

from his Chair] was much celebrated among the party The 

fame of his learning had brought Exeter College (of which he was 
Rector) into such repute that it became the residence of more great 
and learned men, especially foreigners, than any College of that 
University had ever before been." We find that numbers of 
English noblemen sent their sons to his especial care. Of his eleva- 
tion to the Episcopate Fuller says: Charles singled him out for 
the post " since the best wine and oil that could be poured into 
those wounds was to select persons of known learning and un- 
blamable lives to supply vacant Bishoprics ;" .and Prince, still more 
quaintly, that he was chosen " when the beasts of the people shook 
the ark of the Church," as one of the six " thought most likely to 
keep it from falling." None of these can be reckoned as writers oi 
the Prideaux school ; but Robert Nelson, the well-known High 
Church author, is a still more unexceptionable witness. Writing 
in 1712, he mentions him in the following words: "That great 
prelate, Bishop Prideaux, who by his learned Works was famous 
abroad as well as in his own country, which, with his steady loyalty 



INTRODUCTION. xix 

to his sovereign, made him worthy of the Bishopric of Worcester, 
which was conferred upon him in 1641, though by the confusions 
of those times he reaped little or no advantage from it ; for he died 
in mean circumstances in September, 1650, and left no legacy to 
his children but pious poverty, God's blessing, and a father's prayers, 
as he expresseth it himself in his last will." a 

Lastly Wood, whose praises are reserved for the Laudian School, 
tells us that Prideaux " behaved himself very plausible to the 
generality, especially for this reason, that in his lectures, disputes, 
and moderatings (which were always frequented by many auditors), 
he showed himself a stout champion against Socinus and Arminius. 
Which being disrelished by some who were then rising and in 
authority at Court, a faction thereupon grew up in the University 
between those called Puritans or Calvinists on the one side, and the 
Remonstrants, commonly called Arminians, on the other: which, 
with other matters of the like nature, being not only fomented in 
the University, but throughout the nation, all things thereupon 
were brought into confusion." And again he tells us that Prideaux 
was " reverence d and admired by all the Academians, except such 
who were commonly called Arminians." This was in 1631. 

The glimpses we catch of Prideaux at this time in Laud's own 
History of his Chancellorship bear out the above testimony, and 
show him much in conflict with these "commonly-called Arminians." 
A word or two must introduce them on the stage. Archbishop 
Bancroft may be identified with the rise of this school to public 
notice, of which we hear next to nothing till the close of the reign 
of Elizabeth. 1 * Early in James's reign Bancroft's much more cele- 
brated follower, Laud, comes before us in Wood's pages in the 
following manner. Just twenty years had elapsed since the his- 
torian had described the University as given up to Calvinism ; and 

a Life (f Bishop Bull, Worlts, vol. vii. p. 11. Prideaux' Evchologia or Practical 
Praying ; a Ltgacylift to his daughters; Private; was repnblished in 1841 by 
Dr. S. W. Ccrnish (Paiker), and seems well deserving of the praises of the Editor. 

b Perry's History of the Church of England, vol. i. pp. 19, 84. Worthies of All 
Souls, pp. 120122. 



XX INTRODUCTION. 

in 1606 the very same year, it may be remarked, that he noticed 
the evil effects of James's visit on the morals of the University he 
tells us that " the first thing of moment that I find memorable 
this year is the preaching of one Mr. William Laud, Bachelor of 
Divinity, in St. Mary's Church ; in which sermon letting drop divers 
passages savouring of Popery, which now seemed scandalous to the 
present Academians, whose thoughts were generally possessed with 
Calvinistic and Puritanical points, Dr. Airay, the Vice- Chancellor, 
called him into question for what he had delivered." (Annals.) 

To describe how what we call the Laudian school, which to the 
country was generally known by its " savour of Popery," came to 
be associated with the opinions of Arminius on Free Will, and how 
this reactionary theology came to be generally styled " Arminian- 
ism," long after it ceased to have any special connection with that 
particular tenet, does not fall within the scope of these remarks. 
It is enough to observe that the system made its way very rapidly 
amongst University men, and with a section of the upper classes 
generally; that two of its most prominent tenets, viz. the Divine 
Eight of Kings and the Divine Right of Bishops, expressed con- 
currently, and with every conceivable form of argument, forcibly 
commended the rest of the doctrine to the pedant king and his 
courtiers ; and that it came to be identified, almost from its com- 
mencement, with the political repression of the popular liberties, 
the suspension of Parliaments, and the disgrace of the country at 
home and abroad 

Not that such a summary of the system would describe the aspect 
in which it was viewed by those who adopted it To them it 
was a grand, homogeneous system, coherent politically, ecclesi- 
astically, doctrinally, which in their reaction from what is now 
called 'Ultra-Protestantism," they persuaded themselves was the 
true and natural interpretation of the Reformation, hitherto ob- 
scured and misunderstood under foreign influences. The First 
Prayerbook of Edward IV. was their model rather than the Second. 
That the laity generally, and especially the middle classes, could not 



INTRODUCTION. XXI 

be expected to receive these views, rather added to the fascination 
which they exercised.* 

At Oxford Laud grew to notoriety by his conflicts on eccle- 
siastical questions with the two Abbots, the Master of University, 
and the Regius Professor of Divinity; and the contest was renewed 
with disastrous effect to the elder brother when he became Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, and Laud, as the acknowledged favourite of 
Prince Charles and Buckingham, gradually succeeded in elbowing 
him out of his metropolitan throne. Brian Duppa, Sheldon, 
Stewart, Jeremy Taylor, and several other good, able, and learned 
men, marched at Oxford alongside of Laud in London, and soon 
changed the current of Oxford theology. In vain Prideaux op- 
posed the rising school with every weapon known to his Chair, 
publicly expressed his horror of Sheldon when he ventured to 
assert that Rome was not the Babylon of the Revelation, and his 
disapproval of many a less gifted disputant when such a man ad- 
vanced, often with the bravado begotten of Court favour, the new 
doctrines. He was, however, quite unable to stem the tide. In 
1631 Laud is supreme: Prideaux is reported to the King for his 
dogged opposition to the Court theology, and soundly rated by 
Charles and the Privy Council. In 1633 he is formally delated 
to Laud, now Archbishop, and finds himself obliged to give up his 
old attitude. We hear no more of any public opposition, but never 
of any change in his views. Though he seems to have professed, 
in some sense, the doctrine of the Divine Right of Bishops, he was 
no friend to the new theology favoured at Court; yet he was still 
less friendly to the violent measures which began to find favour 
with Parliament and people. b 

a See Clarendon's History of the Great Rebellion, book i. pp. 163 172: Oxford 
Edition. 

b The importance of Prideaux' ecclesiastical position may justify a quotation. 
On the last occasion above mentioned, when he defended himself, with success, from 
the malicious charges brought against him before Land and the King, he makes 
the following confession of Faith, or " Protestation": 

" That as I believe the Catholic Church in my creed, so I reverence this Church 
CAMD. SOC. d 



XX11 INTRODUCTION- 

As Vice-Chancellor of the University, an office he served five 
different years, Prideaux did his best to keep order in exceedingly 
difficult times. Wood calls him our " worthy Vice-Chancellor ;" 
as such he was one of the first objects of the fury of the Long Parlia- 
ment in 1642. He had already (in 1641) accepted, though too 
late to be of any use in restoring confidence, the Bishopric of Wor- 
cester. Reduced immediately afterwards to the most absolute 
poverty by the seizure of his revenues, his venerable figure was to 
be seen still lingering on amidst the haunts of his chequered life, a 
silent witness to the Cavaliers of the school of Laud and Strafford, 
that if the via media had been followed in time they might not 
have been reduced to such straits; to the Roundheads, that Scrip- 
tural piety and simplicity of life, and a firm hold of the doctrines 
of the Reformation, might be consistent with faithful adherence to 
the Church of their fathers. We shall come across him again de- 
voting his last years to the personal supervision of the youths who 
still flocked into his old College under the Visitation, and as the 
teacher from whom many leading men of that generation had im- 
bibed what was most valuable in their training. Some years after 

of England, wherein I have had my baptism and whole breeding, as a most eminent 
member of it. To the doctrine and discipline of this Church have I hitherto often 
subscribed, and by God's grace constantly adhered; and resolve by the same assist- 
ance according to my ability (under his Majesty's protection) faithfully to maintain 
against Papists, Puritans, or any other that shall oppose it. The prelacy of our 
revered bishops in it I have ever defended in my place to bejvre divino, which I 
dare say has been more often, and with greater painstaking, than most of those have 
done who have received greater encouragement from their lordships. I desire 
nothing but the continuance of my vocation in a peaceable course, that, after all my 
pains in the place of his Majesty's Professor almost for these eighteen years together, 
my sons especially be not countenanced in my declining age to vilify and vex me. 
So shall I spend the remainder of my time in hearty prayer for his Majesty, my only 
master and patron, for the reverend Bishops, the State, and all his Majesty's 
subjects and affairs, and continue iny utmost endeavours to do all faithful service to 
the Church wherein I live. To whose authority I ever have, and do hereby submit 
myself and studies to be according to God's word directed or corrected. 

" J PBIDEAUX." 
Laud's Works, vol. v. part i. p. 90. 



INTRODUCTION. XX111 

his death one of his Works received a double compliment. His 
Manual of Polemical Theology was published with the highest 
encomiums by Dr. Barlow, the Royalist and future Bishop. It 
came out at Oxford, where it could hardly have appeared (in 1657) 
except by permission of the Parliamentarian Visitors. But perhaps 
it was rather a sign of the change beginning to make itself felt in 
the University. In the Preface the chief merit of the author is 
stated to have been his successful struggle against Pelagianism, 
Socinianism, and the errors of Popery. 

The completeness and rapidity of the change which Laud effected 
at Oxford is essential to an understanding of the subject before us, 
and may be gathered from two or three facts which should now be 
mentioned. It was but in 1606 that we found "Mr. William Laud, 
B.D., scandalizing the Academians." In 1610 Wood reports Mag- 
dalen College to be "a very nest of Puritans," the College which 
soon after became so distinguished on the other side. But in 
1622, when Prince Charles, Buckingham, and Laud had become 
in James's last years the virtual governors of the realm, the 
Annals not obscurely indicate that so-called " Arminianism " was 
already firmly established in the University by authority, in spite 
of Prideaux's opposition, and though still " for the most part dis- 
relished by the generality of Academians." It is needless to 
recount what happened in the following years. The suppression of 
Parliaments rendered the allegiance of Oxford a necessity for the 
Court, and infinite pains were taken to secure that allegiance. By 
1630 the majority against " Arminianism " had been reduced to at 
least equality; for in that year Laud, now Bishop of London, was 
elected Chancellor of the University by a slender majority fas 
officially reported, though open to question, as Wood admits) over 
Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, younger brother of the 
last Chancellor. This narrow victory the contemporary MS. 
Diary of Mr. Crosfield, of Queen's College, places the majority at 
nine had important issues. Not only had Laud's Chancellorship 
a greater effect on Oxford than that of any other holder of the office 



XXIV INTRODUCTION. 

before or since, but it is not difficult to trace the marks of so 
doubtful a defeat on the peevish and irritable mind of the Earl, in 
connection with his subsequent tenure of the office which he had on 
this occasion so nearly grasped. 

Then began that wonderful Decade which, regard it as we may, 
was in truth a period almost equally exceptional with that which 
followed during the Commonwealth. It was not indeed a Govern- 
ment without Church and King, but it was the Government of a King 
without a Parliament, and of a Church in which all doctrines, except 
those of the dominant party, were proscribed and silenced by the 
strong hand a virtual tyranny under honoured forms and names. 
The Chancellorship of Laud made itself instantly felt by overbearing 
acts under colour of suppressing disturbances and the spread of false 
doctrine. All anti-Arminian teachers were severely punished if 
they did not submit or recant. The King's own personal power 
was unscrupulously brought to bear on the University. Not a nook 
or corner escaped the eye of the restless Chancellor. Even the 
Statutes of the University, which he took into his own hands, com- 
pletely re-cast and re-issued, contained many passages which were 
offensive to his theological opponents. 

All this was exceedingly well meant, and much of it was effective, 
much of it useful ; much of it has remained. The Chancellor's own 
experience had taught him the need of many reforms. He had 
witnessed the irruption of luxury and disorder in James's reign, 
and the insufficiency of the attempts to grapple with them. It 
seemed to him just the case for the strong hand. No doubt he 
carried a great reform in morals and manners. His new Charter 
was considered a great and real boon ; his Statutes were a great im- 
provement; his Cycle of Proctors put an end to a perennial source 
of disturbance. Wood's A nnals bear evidence of the success of his 
efforts, while unconsciously supplying us with the means of appre- 
ciating at their true value the means which he employed. Evelyn, 
a Fellow Commoner of Balliol in 1637, notes that " then was the 
University exceedingly regular under the exact discipline of W. 



v INTRODUCTION 

Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, then Chancellor ;" and of course 
in the Works of Heylin and other professed admirers we may find 
still more pronounced expressions in favour of his policy. 

But what had become of the opponents of that policy during the 
ten years of the Chancellorship, and the preceding years during 
which Laud's influence had been so profoundly felt? Many of the 
more vehement spirits had taken their departure from a place where 
they could not publicly profess their opinions ; and, in shaking off 
its dust from their shoes, had thrown in their lot with the Non- 
conformists. This was often done with reluctance, even by such 
men ; but it was intensely difficult for them to find any other employ- 
ment suitable to their education and talents. Extremes beget ex- 
tremes. Others braved it out at Oxford, and nursed their resent- 
ment till their turn came. These, speaking generally, took refuge 
in the Halls, which at Oxford have always been more or less dis- 
tinguished from the Colleges in tone and character, and now 
added to previous jealous differences that of becoming almost ex- 
clusively the nurseries of so-called " Puritanism;" but in several 
Colleges there was still a minority of these men, and in a few, such 
as Merton, under Sir Nathaniel Brent, and in Lincoln, under 
Paul Hood, they may have held their own. In Exeter, under Pri- 
deaux and Conant, the opposition to the Laudian system was 
probably neutralised by the west-country loyalty of that Foundation, 
which supplied a counter-attraction, and grew more and more pro- 
nounced as the catastrophe approached. But in the large majority 
of the Colleges men swam with the stream. 

A very few years of resolute government and weeding-out, by 
able and learned men, are sufficient to turn the scale in a Uni- 
versity, especially when backed by authority, supported on prin- 
ciples which appeal to the conscience, and baited by every worldly 
advantage which it is in the power of Church and State combined 
to confer. Some of those who were only actuated by the lower class 
of motives showed their true colours when the trial came ; but how 
conscientiously the great mass had behaved in the matter is proved 



XXVI INTRODUCTION. 

not only by the almost entire unanimity with which Oxford took 
up the cause of Church and King when the Rebellion broke out, 
but by the evidence of the Register now before us. When the 
King was in extremities, and the Parliament in possession of abso- 
lute power, when the stoutest Royalists had been already slain, or 
forcibly driven from the University, and every inducement was 
at hand to suggest submission, those who preferred to sacrifice 
their places to a hopeless cause were still in a majority of about 
two to one. Many of these had not originally been Cavaliers; 
many had never belonged to the school of Laud and Strafford ; but 
one tyranny had already been forgotten in another. The first 
offenders had paid an awful and excessive penalty, but the execu- 
tioners were by no means forgiven. 

To place then the fluctuations of University opinion and govern- 
ment previous to the Visitation briefly before the reader, they may 
be thus summed up. 

Beginning with Elizabeth's reign, we observe the firm establish- 
ment of the Reformed Church of England as represented by the 
Second Prayer Book of Edward the Sixth ; we witness the su- 
premacy of the via media of the Reformers, as distinguished from 
Romanism and Non-Episcopal Dissent. During her reign the vio- 
lence of that section of the Reformers which had been driven to 
extremity under the Marian persecution showed itself at Oxford for 
a time under the patronage of Leicester, and left its mark. As it 
had received its impulse from the persecuted Lollards of the fifteenth 
century and the iconoclasts of Edward's reign, so the " Puritans " 
propagated their spirit to the Root-and- Branch men of the Great 
Rebellion, and the bitter sectarians of later dates. Their politics 
were coloured by their theology; and, if we owe to their courage 
and desperation some portion of our civil liberties, it may well be 
questioned if they have not retarded by their violence reforms 
which would otherwise have been long ago effected. It was this 
section which had been at once precipitated from the various ele- 
ments of the Church of England by the bitter solvent of the Laudian 



INTRODUCTION. XXvii 

movement. It was this section which threw itself into the conflict 
of King and Parliament with all the ardour of an oppressed people 
suddenly set free. It was this section which took the lead in the 
early days of the Visitation at Oxford, and rejoiced in the task, so 
unwelcome to the more moderate portion of the Visitors, of eject- 
ing the Cavaliers. It chiefly ramified in numerous directions amongst 
the more fanatical sects of the period, but was still also to be found 
among the Presbyterians, who had as a body greatly sobered down 
when the Crown was once trampled in the dust. 

A very large proportion of these Presbyterians had broken off 
from the Church principally on the ground of the novel assertion 
and methods of defence of the Divine Right of Episcopacy. As long 
as the questions in dispute were strictly the doctrinal ones inherent 
in Calvinism they retained their place ; for Calvinism was of course, 
and has always been, what we now call " an open question "; and, 
even further, they were willing to assent to Episcopacy as a decent 
and orderly arrangement, coming down from the early Church, or 
even as sanctioned by Apostolical, or quasi-Apostolical, authority, 
which was the point of view of some of the most learned and ortho- 
dox Churchmen of the age, such as Archbishop Ussher and Lord 
Falkland.* But much more than this was now claimed. They 
might even bear with the jure divino in a Prideaux ; but the claim 
was now accompanied by, and mixed up with, dangerous approxima- 
tions to Rome, apparent enough in the cases of Bishops Mountagu, b 
Goodman, and others, abundantly suspicious in still greater person- 
ages, and emphasized by numerous actual desertions of the English 
for the Roman Church. These men, then, believing that they in- 
herited the via media of the Reformation, and producing a catena of 
authoritative teaching in the University before the innovations com- 

a See Parr's Life of Ussher, App. p. 7; Elringtoii's Life of Ussher, vol. i. pp. 209, 
256, 257. For Lord Falkland's position on this subject, see a Paper in the Church 
Quarterly for July 1877, entitled " Lord Falkland and his Modern Critics," by the 
writer of these pages. 

b For Mountagn's position see " Parliament and the Church of England." (Seeley.) 
1875. 



XXV111 INTRODUCTION. 

menced, often became Presbyterians, very much indeed against 
their will. Their school had been for the larger part of the three 
reigns preceding the Great Rebellion the main strength and sinews 
of the University; they very slowly relinquished their posts. In 
many cases, after a period of Non-conformity, they conformed again ; 
in many the differences between them and those who held on in 
the Church were scarcely perceptible. Many more would have 
conformed at the Restoration, if only the so-called *' Ussher's model" 
of Episcopacy, or something akin to it, could have been established 
at that critical moment.* It is the silencing and estrangement of 
these men from the Church which forms the heaviest count against 
the Laudian movement, and must be regretted even by those who 
most approve of that school. It is in the gradual emergence of 
these men, after the violence of the Visitation of Oxford was passed, 
that we must look for the explanation of the phenomena we are 
about to witness. Though pushed into the background at the com- 
mencement of the Visitation the real government of the University 
fell into their hands ; it was their spirit which mitigated the evils 
attendant on such an experiment; it was their successful discipline, 
their efficient protection, which passed on the University to Restora- 
tion times in a state of which its greatest admirers at other periods 
can adduce no better example. 

Bearing in mind, then, this antecedent history, and observing 
the effects of the decomposing process which had been going on in 
the Church and University in connection with the grossly unconsti- 
tutional government of the Stuart sovereigns, we shall be the less 
surprised at the substantial justice and patient moderation which 
characterized the Parliamentary Visitation when once established, 

" Some doubt hangs over the exact nature of what is called " Ussher's Model " ; 
but what Ussher proposed or sanctioned in 1641, what he proposed in 1648 at New- 
port (and which was accepted by Charles I. and the Presbyterian ministers), and 
what formed the basis of discussion at the Savoy Conference in 1 661 , was substan- 
tially the same thing ; the Bishop was only to act, in Ordination and Jurisdiction, 
in concurrence with other clergy, whether Suffragan Bishops or representative 
Presbyters, and in connection with Synods meeting periodically. 



INTRODUCTION. XXIX 

and not at all surprised at the success which attended it. It was, 
indeed, a Kevolution, a forcible interruption of the accustomed order 
of things, but it was a most orderly interruption. We shall see that 
every effort was made to secure obedience without force, and that 
the expulsions were the absolutely necessary consequence of the 
government of the country having passed into other hands. 

We are here of course merely stating facts. Those facts are 
exactly what the majority of the University, when it was subjected 
to the Visitation, did not understand. They would not acknow- 
ledge that the Parliament had succeeded de facto to the power of 
the Sovereign, and must be obeyed accordingly. They had to be 
ejected. It was better, under the circumstances, that they should 
depart; a centre of opposition to the constituted Government of the 
country could not be tolerated by a completely victorious party. 
However we may admire the dogged English spirit which refuses 
to believe that it is beaten, it was better for the general public 
that those whose consciences forbade them to submit should retire 
for a time, and leave the authorities to work out their own plans 
of reform in their own way. 

But, further, this antecedent history accounts for more than the 
mere abstention from unnecessary violence, and the recurrence 
to the old paths of the University system as soon as it could be 
made with safety. It illustrates the spirit and temper of the Visi- 
tation, taken as a whole, on its constructive side. To a large pro- 
portion of those University men into whose hands the task was 
committed, this government on so-called " Puritanical " principles 
appeared very much in the light of a return to better days which 
had passed away, not so very long before, under the influence of 
the " Arminian " school, a natural reaction, though perhaps carried 
too far, from an extreme direction into which the course of their 
beloved University had been betrayed, a recovery from a disease 
which, during the process of recovery, must necessarily exhibit 
some abnormal symptoms. The old stream had been diverted by 
force : force was necessary to restore it to the proper channel ; but, 

OAMD. SOC. e 



XXX INTRODUCTION. 

when once restored, everything was to go on as nearly as possible, 
mutatis mutandis, as before. 

Of course it is not easy to determine with accuracy how far the 
system of religious doctrine prevalent during this time differed 
from that of the Church as established at the Reformation ; but we 
may gather something from the tenets of the two Regius Professors 
of Divinity who span the period. Dr. Hoyle, who had been Pro- 
fessor of Divinity at Trinity College, Dublin, before the Irish 
Rebellion, devoted a large part of his Inaugural Lecture at Oxford 
to the earnest commendation of Bishop Prideaux; Dr. Conant, who 
succeeded him, was avowedly of Prideaux' school on all essential 
points. The great position formerly held by the Regius Professors 
of Divinity has been already noticed ; and it was certainly not less 
typical at this period than at others. 

We may, then, still imagine the University during the Parlia- 
mentary Visitation to be not very widely sundered from the theo- 
logical standpoint at which it had been overtaken by the Laudian 
movement already described; and, having now marked out the true 
position of affairs in the midst of a long series of fluctuations, we can 
already form some opinion regarding the course which the Visitors 
would naturally take when the power of the Parliament was once 
firmly established. 



CHAPTER II. 
THE GENERAL CHARACTER OF THE VISITATION. 

The antecedent history of the University, a sketch of which has 
been necessary in order to ascertain the relative place of the Visi- 
tation in a series of events, has prepared us to view this temporary 
government chiefly from the controversial and theological side. Such 



INTRODUCTION. XXXI 

is no doubt the most prominent aspect, confronting us at every 
turn ; but we may now attempt to distinguish its characteristics a 
little further. We shall understand the actual reform and govern- 
ment of the University during the Commonwealth all the better 
for pausing a moment to notice the character and career of the 
persons principally concerned in the work. 

And first it must be observed that the distinction which has been 
traced generally between the more fanatical and the more moderate 
sections of the anti-Arminians is equally visible at first among the 
clergy of the Board of Visitors, which comprised men of both 
sorts. To such men as Cheynell and Henry Wilkinson, senior, 
the earlier operations requiring force were willingly relinquished ; 
into the hands of the moderate section, of which Reynolds and 
Conant may be taken as the chief representatives, the construc- 
tive processes mainly fell. The same distinction is observable 
amongst the laymen who took a prominent part. The celebrated 
Prynne may be considered the type (at this time) of the violent 
party; the learned Selden, who had belonged to the party of Hyde 
and Falkland in 1641, of the moderate section. Prynne was sent 
with the Chancellor as a sort of Assessor when all measures short 
of force had been patiently tried, and summary ejection had to 
be commenced. Smarting under the loss of his ears, he had not 
yet learnt what was involved in the overthrow of a political Con- 
stitution which, however abused, had carried with it sufficient 
safeguards if these had only been vindicated and applied with 
true patriotism. Selden. on the other hand, gave his best advice 
to the Royalists, listened to the pleadings of the imprisoned 
monarch for his friends, and procured for the leaders of the Uni- 
versity that they should at least be represented by proper Counsel 
before the Committee of Parliament. 

We cannot indeed draw any very definite line between Presby- 
terians and Independents on this point. Selden, and some who 
acted with him on the above Committee, were Erastians or Inde- 
pendents; several of them, though not Selden himself, taking the 



XXX11 INTRODUCTION. 

course of lenity out of mere opposition, in consequence of the jealousy 
which had already burst forth between the two great parties as soon 
as they had become victorious. And amongst the Oxford Visitors 
who left their personal mark, and who must be classed with Reynolds 
and Conant among the wiser and more moderate section of the 
reformers, was Doctor John Owen, an Independent, who was 
expressly placed in office by Cromwell as his representative. Still 
further, we associate with these men no less a person than the great 
Protector himself, whom we shall see exercising his functions on 
the whole in accordance with the title he had selected, and, as 
Chancellor of the University, displaying a remarkable contrast to 
his predecessor, the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, whose 
Presbyterianism was of the violent type expressed by Cheynell, 
Wilkinson, and Sir Nathaniel Brent. 

Still it may be asserted that, taking the whole period of the Com- 
monwealth together, the government of the University had a decided 
tendency to fall under the influence of that moderate section of the 
Presbyterians who have been described in the last chapter, and who 
learnt more and more moderation from the adversity to which they 
found themselves exposed at the hands of the party which held the 
sword. Under their influence and management we shall observe 
the interference of the Visitors becoming more and more excep- 
tional, more and more confined to cases of gross scandal and of the 
re-appearance of abuses only half suppressed. We shall see College 
after College receiving permission to elect its own officers ; Convoca- 
tion becomes more and more independent; the general routine, the 
academical exercises, the proper business of the University, gradually 
fall into their place; the old solemnities are restored, dangerous 
attacks repulsed, and a general feeling of confidence established. In 
short, under their government the education of English youth at 
Oxford soon began to proceed much as before the Rebellion. The 
Colleges no longer afforded the dreary spectacle which the Civil 
War had produced; abuses were removed, residence enforced, tutors 
made to do their duty, financial order restored. They were soon 



INTRODUCTION. XXXlll 

filled to overflowing: the country gentlemen sent their sons in 
greater numbers than of old, and with much less alarm for their 
principles. The religious element was far more visibly present than 
even in the days of Laud: the difference lay in its administration, 
and in the prevalence of religious practices, which were not, it is 
true, those of the Church, but were perhaps worked by several of 
the tutors in ways more or less in harmony with the views of anti- 
Arminian Churchmen. Nelson a describes how even Sanderson and 
Bull contrived, in their respective parishes, to satisfy the demand 
for extempore prayers out of the very words and matter of the 
Church Formularies; and probably this practice was not unknown 
at Oxford. A large proportion of the elder officers of the University 
and Colleges had been episcopally ordained. 

But the history of the Vice- Chancellors who span the period will 
be more suggestive than anything else; and to that the remainder 
of this chapter will be devoted. Their appointment rested with the 
Chancellor. 

One of the chief securities for the independence and self-govern- 
ment of the Universities was, from their very foundation, held to be 
their free election of a Chancellor. To quote the summary account 
of the history of this office, which till of late years was to be found 
at the commencement of the Oxford Calendar, " This office was for- 
merly triennial and sometimes annual; John Russel, Bishop of 
Lincoln in the year 1484, being the first Chancellor who was elected 
for life. Before this period the office was generally executed by 
some resident member of the University; afterwards it appears to 
have been frequently holden by bishops, and lastly by laymen, the 
first of whom was Sir John Mason, Knight, who was elected in 
1552." The Chancellors of the period now under review were three 
in number Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Oliver 
Cromwell, and Richard Cromwell. The first had been, as already 
noticed, elected in 1641, in succession to Laud, superseded by the 

Life of Bull, Works, vol. vii. p. 33. 



XXXIV INTRODUCTION. 

Royal authority and the action of the University when Oxford was 
held by the King in 1643, and " restored," as the Parliament con- 
sidered it to be, in 1647, by their authority. Concerning the influ- 
ence exercised by each of these Chancellors, enough will appear as 
we proceed : their characters and position are too well known to 
require any special notice in this place. 

There was no order of selection, as at present, by which the 
Chancellor was guided in the appointment of a Vice-Chancellor. 
Indeed, before the issue of the Laudian Statutes, it had not even 
been necessary to select a Head of a House. Laud had appointed 
the fittest man to govern the University according to his own views. 
Those who now held his office did of course precisely the same thing. 
The greatest pains were taken at each vacancy to secure the assist- 
ance of a local governor suitable to the supposed necessities of the 
times. These were, during the twelve years which succeeded the 
expulsion of the stout old Royalist, Dr. Samuel Fell, in 1648, four 
in number Doctors Reynolds, Greenwood, Owen, and Conant. 
One of these, Doctor Greenwood, will not require a special notice, 
as he was only appointed by way of stop-gap till a proper successor 
to Reynolds could be found. He had attracted Laud's notice in 1637 
as a " peevish and factious" Puritan. a Wood calls him a "severe 
and good governor," and he was useful in keeping order, but he 
was otherwise a man of no mark. The others were leaders of their 
generation; each in his turn was recognised as facile princeps. 
Further, they were not only Vice-Chancellors, but leading Visitors. 
It is therefore worth while to linger a little over their history 
before we describe their acts. Reynolds held the office from April 
1648 to October 1650; Owen from September 1652 to October 
1657; Conant from October 1657 to August 1660. 

The salient points of similarity which marked out these three 
men in turn for the Vice- Chancellorship were their high private 
character, their undoubted piety, their extensive learning, their 

Laud's Works, vol. v. part i. p. 182. 



INTRODUCTION. XXXV 

special power as preachers, their reputation for ability and good 
sense. All this may be gathered even from the pages of the 
bitter and satirical Wood, who can scarcely be said to note any 
real fault against Keynolds or Owen, though he makes the most of 
any circumstance which tells against them; while the only notice 
that he takes of Conant (and that not in his Annals) is that 
he calls him a " learned, pious, and meek divine.'" 1 There are 
fortunately fuller accounts extant of these men in the form of 
biographies, little known perhaps in the present day, and composed 
in a strain of admiration by friendly writers, but eminently useful in 
enabling us to form a judgment as to their respective merits. 
Reynolds and Conant are distinguished from Owen by the course 
they took amidst the perplexities of the times, a course remark- 
ably similar in each case, before and independently of the relation- 
ship formed by the marriage of Conant to Reynolds's daughter. 
They were alike in their fluctuations between the Church and Non- 
conformity, though showing differences at different times; they both 
ended their careers as widely venerated Church dignitaries. Owen, 
on the other- hand, driven from Queen's College by resentment at 
the Laudian government in 1637, threw in his lot with the Inde- 
pendents, and never came back to the Church of England. 

Dr. Edward Reynolds had been formerly a Fellow of Merton 
College, and as such decidedly opposed to the rising " Arminian " 
school. The controversies of Charles's reign landed him at about 
the time of the Great Rebellion in Presbyterianism, and with that 
party, when the struggle commenced, he took the Covenant. But 
he was chiefly known as a preacher, a preacher acceptable to men 
of all parties, one of the very few of that time who did not carry 
politics into the pulpit. Any one who examines the six volumes 
of printed sermons which have come down to our own times can 
observe this for himself. They will find no distinctive Calvinism 
in them, little or no controversial matter; but singularly beautiful 

a Fasti, vol. iv. p. 398. 



XXXVI INTRODUCTION. 

and effective discourses of a thoroughly Scriptural character, in 
which some allowance must of course be made for the " long- 
windedness " of the sermons of those days. For the benefit of 
those who might consider this examination too severe a task, two 
authors may be quoted. Wood tells us that Reynolds was " a person 
of excellent parts and endowments, of a very good wit, fancy, and 
judgment, a great divine, and much esteemed by all parties for his 
preaching and florid style." Sir Thomas Browne, the famous author 
of the Religio Medici, tells us that Reynolds was " a man of 
singular affability, meekness, and humility, of great learning, a 
frequent preacher, and constant resident. For his divinity he 
was a true continuer of the name of Reynolds in the Church of 
England, and for his sermons they have run the gauntlet through 
the University, the Inns of Court, and the City. They have met 
with the approbation of both the prince and his people, scholars, 
gentlemen, and citizens." Wood also tells us that his Works were 
u printed several times, and much bought up and commended by 
men of several persuasions." 9 In the same passage of Wood may 
be found many depreciatory remarks about Reynolds on the score 
of his Presbyterianism and his time-serving conduct. Let us 
examine the latter charge. 

We must take Reynolds as we find him, a Presbyterian. As 
such he could certainly not be blamed by an impartial judge for 
accepting the leading part to which he was summoned as one of 
the seven selected preachers to " prepare the way for the Visitation," 
or subsequently as one of the Visitors, as Vice-Chancellor, and as 
Dean of Christchurch. On his own principles he was in his proper 
place. The only question is, how did he use his most invidious 
office? It is speaking volumes to say that no single charge is brought 
against him in this capacity by Wood, who indeed in his quaint 
way remarks that " loath he was to nauseate his reputation by 
actions so much repugnant to his profession till baited with Chey- 

8 Ath. Ox. vol. iii. p. 1085. 



INTRODUCTION. XXXV11 

nell's execrations of his detestable neutrality ;" and he is admitted to 
be personally free from the harshness which of necessity accom- 
panied the early expulsions. He was of too gentle a nature for those 
rougher processes. Again, as soon as the King's so-called " execu- 
tion " takes place, we at once mark a change in his relations to the 
ruling power which prove his honest sincerity. The " Engagement," 
by which the existing government of England, without a King or 
House of Lords, was to be recognized, was now pressed upon the Uni- 
versity. We shall see that great latitude was allowed to Conant in 
accepting this instrument; and no doubt Reynolds could have had 
the same terms. The celebrated Sanderson had shown, with his con- 
summate skill in casuistry, that there might be circumstances under 
which loyal subjects of the King could take it, a but Reynolds stood 
firm, and in consequence lost, first the Vice-Chancellorship, and 
then the Deanery of Christ Church. This was giving up all for the 
sake of conscience. None after this could accuse him of self-seeking. 
Baxter has indeed asserted that Reynolds offered to take the En- 
gagement when too late ; but his biographer rejects this unsupported 
statement. He now retired to London, and quietly took up once 
more his old place as minister to a Presbyterian congregation. But 
his turn came again. The Independents ran their course. Crom- 
well was dead. The secluded Presbyterian Members of Parliament 
resumed their place, and Reynolds was restored to the Deanery of 
Christ Church in the year before the Restoration. With his party 
he shared largely in bringing about that event, and used his in- 
fluence at Oxford in its favour, along with his son-in-law Conant, 
now Vice-Chancellor. 

The conduct of Reynolds from that moment is part of English 
history. His interview with Charles at Breda, and acceptance of a 
royal chaplaincy, his efforts to secure better terms for his party at the 
Savoy Conference, and his substantial failure, more from Baxter's 
fault than his own, his return to the Church, his preferment to the 

a Sanderson's Works, Preface, xiv., and vol. vi. p. 380. 
CAMD. 8OC. / 



XXXV111 INTRODUCTION. 

Bishopric of Norwich, his avowed disappointment at the repudiation 
of the Declaration of Breda, are conspicuous facts. Just as before 
the Rebellion so many men of the old Reformation school of 
Elizabeth, honestly believing their doctrines to be those of the 
Church of England, learnt to object to honoured terms and reverent 
ceremonies because they had been grossly abused by semi-Romanists, 
and offended at the exaggerated claims for Episcopacy put forth in 
later times, would willingly have accepted the so-called " Ussher's 
Model," so it was at the Restoration. That " Model " makes the 
chief point of the Address presented by the Presbyterians to Charles 
at Breda ; in the use of ceremonies they desired some liberty. , The 
point of difference between Reynolds and his followers on the one 
hand, and Baxter, Calamy, and the mass of the Presbyterians on the 
other, does not appear, when the whole subject was brought under 
full discussion, to have been of any considerable magnitude. The 
border-line was difficult to define. A very little more would have 
brought Baxter to Reynolds's side. The latter thought Conformity 
under the circumstances the least of two evils ; the former thought 
the same of Nonconformity. Both acted conscientiously. It is a 
question with which we are not here concerned whether some slight 
concessions, which might not have really injured the Church, would 
not have prevented the permanent secession of those whose loss has 
been so disastrous; it is only necessary in this place to point out 
that we must think for ourselves in judging of Reynolds's career, 
and refuse to be satisfied with the gloss put upon it by partisan 
opponents. His subsequent life was blameless and eminently useful. 
That we hear but little of it publicly in the reign of Charles the 
Second is perhaps in its favour. There is one title at least to our 
respect and affection o.f which Bishop Reynolds can never be de- 
prived. It ought not to be forgotten that the form of " General 
Thanksgiving " in our Prayer-book, which is perhaps of all portions 
of the Liturgy that most generally prized, was his contribution to 
the Revision of 1662. 

Dr. John Owen was even more the leading Divine of the Inde- 



INTRODUCTION. XXxix 

pendents than Reynolds of the Presbyterians; but he was a very 
different, and in some respects a more remarkable, man. He was 
selected by Cromwell to succeed Reynolds as Dean of Christ Church 
and Vice -Chancellor, to keep order in the newly-reformed Uni- 
versity, and to see that the reforms were thoroughly worked out. 
That great judge of character knew his man. From his point of 
view John Owen possessed every qualification for the task. 

Born of a good Welsh family in 1616, and residing at Queen's 
College, Oxford, from the age of 12 to that of 21, he had imbibed, 
under the learned Barlow, his tutor, a full draught of Oxford 
learning at a time when the great streams of controversy were in 
tumultuous conflict. He was one of those " irreconcilables " whose 
course was irrevocably determined by the violence of the Court 
policy which rose triumphant under Laud. His whole nature re- 
volted against it. Thus the Covenant, the Rebellion, the Negative 
Oath, the Engagement, all came as a matter of course to him, and 
found in him a keen supporter. His sermon before the regicides on 
the day after the King's " execution " was interpreted to convey 
approval. Cromwell selected him, and almost compelled him against 
his will, to go as his own chaplain on the invasion of Ireland, and 
employed him to preach the University of Dublin into obedience. 
So well was he pleased with him that he required him to go to 
Scotland the next year, and employed him in exactly the same 
manner at Edinburgh. While one fought the other preached. It 
was no wonder that in the year following he considered so well-tried 
a comrade the proper person for a delicate mission to Oxford. For 
no one knew better than Cromwell the importance of securing 
the Universities. At his State visit to Oxford with Fairfax, in 1649, 
we shall see that he took care to create the most favourable im- 
pression possible. In 1650 he accepted the Chancellorship. He 
already saw his way to the kingly, or quasi-kingly, position, and 
he knew what Oxford had been to kings. No unnecessary vio- 
lence was to be used. It was to be as nearly as possible the same 
self-governing Oxford as of old; but it must be secured, firmly 



x INTRODUCTION. 

secured, and yet dexterously managed so that it should not chafe 
the bit. Where could he find such a rider as Owen ? 

Let us hear Wood's account of this man, derived, as he tells us, 
from his " own personal knowledge." After describing the antago- 
nistic views taken by others of one who could not but call forth 
the strongest praise or blame from friends or enemies, and after 
having vented his own indignation at his course as an Independent 
and a rebel, and especially at the laxity he showed when Vice- 
Chancellor in the matter of University costume, he goes on to say : 
" He was a person well skilled in the tongues, rabbinical learning, 
Jewish rites and customs, had a great command of his English pen, 
and was one of the most genteel and fairest writers who have 
appeared against the Church of England .... His personage was 
proper and comely, and he had a very graceful behaviour in the 
pulpit, an eloquent elocution, a winning and insinuating deportment, 
and could by the persuasion of his oratory, in conjunction with 
some other outward advantages, move and wind the affections of 
his admiring auditory almost as he pleased." a A list of his works 
fills several pages of the Athence ; many of them are still popular. 

How Owen found time in such a busy and various life to acquire 
the prodigious store of learning which it is acknowledged on all 
hands that he possessed, is of itself surprising; but it is still more 
remarkable that such labours should have been congenial to a 
person of his active habits and powers of administration. He was 
indeed, though a man of blameless life and admitted piety, a 
decided member of what has been nicknamed the " Church Mili- 
tant." His youth had been distinguished for athletic accomplish- 
ments; and Wood describes his conduct as Vice-Chancellor of 
Oxford University at a rising of the Cavaliers in 1654-5. Owen 
undertook for the defence of the county of Oxford as well as the 
University. For the safety of the latter " a troop of scholars were 
forthwith raised and armed, and put in a posture of defence under 

* Ath. Ox. vol. iv. p. 97. 



INTRODUCTION. xli 

the command of Dr. Stephens, Doctor of Physic and Principal of 
Hart Hall, in the head of whom the said Owen did often appear 
well mounted, with a sword by his side and a case of pistols before 
him" (Annals). 

On another occasion, as we learn from Owen's biographer, he 
showed courage and presence of mind. It was at the celebration 
of the University " Act." This time-honoured observance, so long 
intermitted, though an almost necessary part of the University 
system, on account of the troubles of Oxford, had, under Vice- 
Chancellor Greenwood, been recently restored, but it was no longer 
held under a guard of soldiers, as in 1651 : 

One of Trinity College was Terra Films [the elected wag of the scholars, who 
on these occasions was always allowed the greatest license] , and before he began the 
Doctor stood up, and in Latin told him that he should have liberty to say what he 
pleased, provided he would avoid profanity and obscenity, and not go into any per- 
sonal reflections. The Terrse Filius began, and in a little time transgressed in all 
the foregoing particulars ; upon which the Doctor did several times desire him to 
forbear those things that reflected such dishonour upon the University ; but notwith- 
standing he went on in the same manner. At length the Doctor, seeing him obsti- 
nate, sent his beadles to pull him down, upon which the scholars interposed, and 
would not suffer them to come near him. Then the Doctor resolved to pull him 
down himself. His friends dissuaded him for fear the scholars should do him some 
mischief, but he replied, " I will not see the University so trampled on ;" and here- 
upon he pulled him down, and sent him to Bocardo [the prison in the North Gate 
of the city], the scholars standing amazed to see his courage and resolution.* 

To understand the significance of Owen's conduct it is necessary 
to have some acquaintance with the curious history of these " Acts," 
the desperate vigour with which the ancient licence of the Terras 
Filius was always defended, and the aggravation afforded to that 
licence, in times like that of the Commonwealth or the first Jacobite 
Rebellion, by the vehemence of party conflict. At the latter date 
it taxed all the courage and energy of Vice-Chancellor Gardiner 
to put an end to this inveterate nuisance . b 

a Life, prefixed to Works, p. xi. Of the modern Lives the best is by Onne (1826). 
<> W. of All Souls,?. 369. 



xlii INTRODUCTION. 

To these instances may be added Owen's courageous conduct in 
protesting against Cromwell's assumption of the Royal title. This 
was to sacrifice his whole career to his principles; and indeed he 
lost his patron's favour in consequence, as well as his Vice -Chan- 
cellorship. 

In a man of such spirit, and representing such principles as the 
Independents in those days practised rather than professed, it was the 
more creditable that Owen behaved so generously to his opponents. 
To the Presbyterians, whose chief authority he was appointed to 
supersede, he showed conspicuous generosity when he might have 
acted very differently. To the Church of England, proscribed and 
persecuted, he acted as follows : " He suffered to meet quietly about 
three hundred Episcopalians every Lord's Day over against his own 
door, where they celebrated divine service according to the worship 
of the Church of England. And though he was often urged to it, yet 
he would never give them the least disturbance; and if at any time 
they met with opposition or trouble on that account it was from 
other hands and always against his mind." a This was that " loyal 
Assembly" described by Sir Leoline Jenkins, which "met not 
only on Sundays but week-days too, at Dr. Willis his house under 
the conduct of incomparable Dr. Fell, [afterwards] Dean of Christ- 
church, where the Church may be said to have retired to that 
virep&ov there, with such circumstances of primitive devotion and 
solemnity as was hardly to be paralleled otherwhere during the 
storm of that persecution." b Wood gives much the same account 
of this " loyal Assembly," saying that it met at Mr. T. Willis', 
the physician's, lodgings in Canterbury quadrangle, and then in 
his house, "against Merton College church, to which place ad- 
mitting none but their confidants, prayers and surplices were used 
on all Lord's Days, Holydays, and their Vigils, as also the Sacra- 



a Life, prefixed to Works, p. xi. 

b Life of Dr. Mansell, D.D. Principal of Jesus College. By Sir Leoline Jenkins, 
Knt. LL.D. London, 1854. 



INTRODUCTION. xliii 

ment according to the Church of England administered." (Annals.) 
His generosity to needy scholars should also be mentioned as a 
marked point in the Oxford career of this distinguished man. 

Owen's character comes out in connection with his Vice-Chan- 
cellorship somewhat, as might be expected, tinctured with the force 
of such a nature. Some remarks upon it will be found in a later 
chapter ; but, beyond his truly " Independent" indifference to acade- 
mical costume, no substantial fault is recorded against him by 
"Wood. He found himself, to his great annoyance, rivalled in his 
turn by a brother Independent, Dr. Goodwin, who, after the above- 
mentioned protest, superseded him in Cromwell's favour ; and he 
seems to have been sometimes, though not always, right in his 
struggles with the " reformed" University. There is an instance 
of this sort towards the close of his official career, when, taught 
by experience, he insisted on a reform of the annual " Act," but 
his attempt to coerce the University happily failed. The recovery 
of power by the Presbyterians put Keynolds once more into his 
old place at Christchurch, and Conant had long been preparing for 
the office of Vice-Chancellor. Owen passes away into obscurity, 
a simple Independent minister, destined, as men supposed, to receive 
punishment at the Restoration for the violent part he had taken ; 
but, to Wood's astonishment, he was not excepted from the Act 
of Indemnity. The fact is that Clarendon protected him. He 
knew Owen's story well, made allowance for his errors, and under- 
stood his merits. He had indeed specially complimented him on 
a controversial work against Rome. " He treated him," as Wood 
tells us, " with all kindness and respect;" but, when he found 
him "holding a conventicle," he gave him up. Obscurity was 
the highest favour he could expect at that time. He suffered 
considerably in the persecutions with which the Nonconformists 
were subsequently visited, and died in 1683. Owen's biographer 
draws a picture of him much like Wood's, the picture of a tall, 
well-made, gentlemanly man, affable and facetious in manner and 
conversation, decided and resolute in action, yet self-controlled, 



xliv INTRODUCTION. 

generous, prudent, and moderate. The result of his government 
was of the same sort as that of Reynolds, but, coming at a later 
date, when affairs were more settled, it was even more marked in 
the sense of conservation or rather restoration. 

The career of Dr. John Conant, our third specimen of the period, 
is for the present purpose even more important than that of either 
of his predecessors. They were Visitors only for detached portions 
of the period under review ; he for nearly the whole of it. When the 
Visitors were drawing towards the end of their work he was already 
Vice- Chancellor, and remained so, for three years, till the Restora- 
tion, during which time the Chancellorship was almost in abeyance. 
We thus have before us the man who most nearly of all measures 
the whole series of questions which engage our attention ; and we 
may well require to know what manner of man he was. And yet 
has anyone ever heard of him ? Reynolds and Owen are perfectly 
well known; what do we know of Conant? 

An actor on the University stage of that period who does not 
also happen to fill a place in the national history has no chance of 
emerging from obscurity except in the pages of Wood, or by means 
of some special biography. Wood is silent, and his silence is sus- 
picious. In the last year of Conant's Vice-Chancellorship the his- 
torian had an interview with him. It was for the purpose of 
obtaining access to the University archives, with a view to his 
great Work. But Conant, he says, " looked on him as a young 
man, and not able to do such a matter. Nothing being done, they 
parted." Somewhat later Professor Wallis listened to his request.* 
Wood is not quite so notorious as Burnet for allowing personal 
feelings to qualify his treatment of contemporaries ; but there are 
numerous instances of that sort, and it was impossible to touch the 
sensitive antiquary on a more tender point. Nor was the Life of 
Conant by his son printed till the present century, nor, when printed, 
known. The MS. had been seen by the editor of the Biographia 
Britannica in the middle of the last century, but in later works of 

a Wood's Life, p. i. 



INTRODUCTION. xlv 

the sort it was not used. Let us see what we can gather from it, 
and from such other sources as are open to us. 

Born in 1608, Conant, as a Devonshire man, came to Exeter, 
the Devonshire College, already famous under Holland and Pri- 
deaux. There he became the favourite pupil of the latter, and 
Fellow of his College in 1632. " Conanti nihil difficile " was the 
punning judgment passed on him by his Kector, who prophesied 
that he would one day succeed him in his offices, both as Head of 
the College and Regius Professor, which came to pass. As student 
and tutor he had few, if any, equals. The breaking out of the war 
deprived him of his pupils, and drove him into the country, where 
he became an exemplary country clergyman, and was known as a 
divine of Prideaux* school, the old school of the Reformation. It 
is characteristic of his simple and high-minded nature, that, when he 
had little if anything but his Fellowship to fall back upon, he made 
over the whole of his paternal estate to a younger brother who had 
many children. The trial now came. He was called upon to 
relinquish this Fellowship or to sign the Covenant. He preferred 
to resign rather than " abjure the good order that was established 
in this Church ever since the Reformation, and was perfected under 
Queen Elizabeth." This was in 1647; but he was not forgotten in 
his College. Two years later, a vacancy occurring in the Rector- 
ship of Exeter, he was elected to that office. And here we cannot 
but notice the opportuneness of his arrival once more on the scene 
of his old labours at this particular juncture. The Visitors had 
been firmly established, the expulsions for the most part completed, 
and his own College so much in harmony with the Visitation that 
it was the first of them all to be pronounced " in a capacity to 
choose " its own Head. He was thus freed from the invidiousness 
of the previous harsh measures which would have clung to him 
in his capacity of Visitor. 

We are next to observe that in this year, 1649, he must not only 
have accepted the " Covenant," which he had before refused, but 
also the " Engagement," which Reynolds declined. With regard 

CAMD. SOC. 



xlvi INTRODUCTION. 

to the first, as his whole conduct acquits him of self-seeking, we 
must suppose he felt that matters had now gone too far to justify 
him in declining to do the work to which he had been called by 
those who knew him best. The points of difference which agi- 
tated religious men at this time were not so clear as they now seem 
to us, nor did they always obscure the honest judgment of strong 
and decided High Churchmen in relation to the actors in these 
scenes. The famous Robert Nelson was well acquainted with all 
the facts about Conant, yet he calls him " a great man, who encou- 
raged learning during his government, and gave an example of 
piety to those under his care." a 

There is nothing except the pronounced Calvinism of Prideaux' 
earlier Works to distinguish the theological principles of that divine 
from those of Reynolds and Conant. All three of them, acknow- 
ledged to be among the most learned men of their day, believed 
that they represented the Primitive Church and the Elizabethan 
Establishment. Two of them were bishops, one an archdeacon. 
Yet the first, strenuously resisting the Laudian theology, but accept- 
ing (in some sense) the Divine right of Kings and Bishops, threw 
himself, in spite of the persecutions he had undergone from Charles 
and Laud, into the cause of Church and King, and died a martyr 
for his principles: the second, unable to accept the claims of the 
English Episcopate, joined the Parliament in the Great Rebellion, 
but giving up all when his King was dead, rather than put his 
hand to the " Engagement " which postulated a Commonwealth, 
gradually returned to Church and King: the third, agreeing more 
nearly with Reynolds than with Prideaux on questions of Church 
and State, yet too much attached to the Constitution to join the 
Parliamentarians during either their war or their victory, was 
ready, when things had gone so far that nothing else could be 
done, to co-operate with them in working the institutions which 
he was summoned to administer. On the other hand, he carried 

* Life of Bull, Wwlts, vol. vii. p. 10. 



INTRODUCTION. xlvii 

his objections to the reorganisation of the Church at the Restora- 
tion further than Reynolds. Though heartily working with him 
for that great event, connected with him by marriage, standing by 
his side at the Savoy Conference, and offered " an ecclesiastical 
dignity, supposed to be the Bishopric of Exeter," he again pre- 
ferred to give up everything rather than conform, taking his place 
among the Philip Henrys, and that numerous moderate section of 
Presbyterians who were Churchmen in everything but the recogni- 
tion of English Episcopacy. His mind would seem to have been 
an essentially practical one, agreeing on this point, no doubt, with 
Stillingfleet and Reynolds, who are reported to have held that 
" no Church-government is determined in the Word of God, but 
is variable as occasion requireth." a It took ten years to con- 
vince him that the Church, as settled at the Restoration, unsatisfac- 
torily as he thought, had attained that stability which gave a 
promise of national acceptance. Following much the same course 
of anxious inquiry as before, when he joined the Nonconformists, he 
at last made up his mind, in 1670, to rejoin the Communion in 
which he had formerly ministered so successfully. Some years 
later he became Archdeacon of Norwich and Prebendary of Wor- 
cester, dying in old age, admired and beloved for his Apostolical 
simplicity and devotion, " a worthy member of the Church of 
England." b 

A few more words must be said upon Conant's conduct with 
respect to the " Engagement," as it is not only characteristic, but 
suggestive as to the progress of the Visitors. We have seen that 
formulary pressed upon him as soon as he accepted the Rectorship of 
Exeter. It is a proof of the anxiety felt to secure the services of the 
Rector that he was allowed to lodge a Protest to the effect that " he 
must not be understood to approve of what hath been done unto or 
under this present government," and that he did not thereby so 

a Baxter's Life, book i. part ii. p. 278. 
b Life of Bull, Works, vol. vii. p. 11. 



xlviii INTRODUCTION. 

bind himself, " but that if God shall remarkably call me to submit 
to any other power I may be at liberty to obey that call, notwith- 
standing the present Engagement." a In short, he would obey the 
"powers that be." The quaint author who supplies us with this 
interesting Protest thinks it necessary to defend his " Worthy " 
from the charge of self-interest in the following words: "This 
may purge him from those dirty reflections any censorious bigot 
may asperse his memory withall; who yet, perhaps, in the same 
circumstances, how squeamish soever he may now seem, would 
have swallowed all a whole without chewing." And he sums up 
Conant's services to the University thus: " Though the times that 
then were were very dangerous and ticklish, and the mouths of the 
men in power began to water upon the Colleges and the revenues 
thereunto belonging, yet the Doctor stoutly defended his post, 
maintaining the rights and liberties of the University, and kept all 
in peace and quiet." Archbishop Tillotson was wont to speak of 
Conant in equally high terms. 

Some notice of the more general work done by Conant as Vice- 
Chancellor will appear in a subsequent chapter; but this will be 
the best place to give a few details of his management of his 
College and the University. As it happens, they afford us the 
only complete insight which we are able to obtain into the real 
operation of the system which the Visitation was intended to intro- 
duce, and supply the best answer to some of the difficulties stated 
in the previous chapter. The reader will hardly quarrel with their 
length. In estimating Conant's influence we must bear in mind 
that soon after he becomes Head of his House, in 1649, he is added 
to the Board of Visitors (we find his signature in 1651); that he is 
one of the second Board temporarily appointed by Cromwell and 
the Parliament in 1652, and also of the third and last Board ap- 
pointed in 1654; and, as we have seen, that he concentrated in his 
person such powers of government as were still required when the 

a Prince's Worthies. 



INTRODUCTION. xlix 

Visitation came to an end. His responsibility therefore is clear and 
undoubted; and it is a pity that his son, in writing his Life, at a 
time when the Visitation was odious, should have shrunk from 
even once mentioning that he was a Visitor. From the same 
cause, probably, we do not find it mentioned by Prince. In the 
various lists where his name occurs as Visitor "Wood gives it with- 
out comment, probably dreading to attach too much respectability 
to the Visitation. 

Besides the above duties we must remember that Conant also per- 
formed, from 1654 to 1660, that of Kegius Professor of Divinity in 
succession to Hoyle. In this chair his lectures, which were " read 
constantly twice a week in Term time," were received, we are told, 
" with universal applause." His extraordinary linguistic accomplish- 
ments must have given him great authority. '* He was so perfect a 
master of Greek that he often disputed in it." He was also a great 
Syriac scholar, and " had good skill in the [other] Oriental lan- 
guages. " Latin of course was the language of daily official life; and 
a striking instance is given of the effect he produced by an im- 
promptu speech on a certain difficult occasion. His extreme modesty 
prevented his publication of either lectures or sermons, to which he 
was constantly pressed by the highest authorities; indeed he burnt 
them. Wood curtly says, " he hath published nothing." Six 
volumes of his sermons have, however, been collected and pub- 
lished by Bishop Williams. They were for the most part preached 
in the later part of his life, and have not attained any celebrity. 

It will now be necessary, since no condensation will be of any 
further use, to give some extracts from Conant's Life in full. 
Enough has been said to show that they may be trusted. 

The wars had not only exhausted the College treasury, hut also much weakened 
the College discipline, and reduced the number of the students miserably short of 
what it was before. He therefore resolves on the only probable means of new 
peopling his College, which was to be constantly resident, according to his engage- 
ment, and apply himself with zeal and rigour to the correcting such abuses as he 
found, and recovering that ancient and wholesome discipline for which Exeter 
College had been so famous under the government of Dr. Holland and Dr. Prideanx. 



1 INTRODUCTION. 

He determines to prevent as much as possible any the least irregularity within his 
walls, and strictly to keep himself and the Society to the most exact observance of 
the statutes and customs of that once flourishing House. In the College his chief 
care was to plant the fear of God in the youth there, and see that they had well 
laid the foundation of sincere piety and true religion. And in order to this he was 
very careful to recommend the youth to pious as well as learned tutors. He would 
often call on them to be true to their trusts and examples to their pupils, to have a 
watchful eye over them, and as for such as were designed by their parents for the 
service of the Church he took more than ordinary pains with them to make them 
sensible how much it concerned them to be more strictly holy and religious who 
were to be " the salt of the earth and light of the world." 

It was his constant care to keep up in the College the worship of God in all its 
life and purity. The public prayers in the College chapel he would constantly 
attend upon, whatever other business he neglected, and would frequently officiate in 
his own person ; and he was so strict in obliging the whole College to a constant 
attendance that it has been observed yon should hardly find one who had absented 
himself from chapel twice in a week throughout the whole year, unless hindered by 
sickness, though their numbers were soon increased to two hundred and upward. 

Every Sunday at morning prayer he would constantly expound some difficult 
passages of scripture which would take up more than half-an-hour. He would make 
critical observations on the text, which he always closed with brief and practical 
applications ; so that his auditory had from him choice materials for forming their 
judgments as scholars and for influencing their lives as Christians. 

Once a week he had a Catechetical lecture in the chapel for the improvement of 
the undergraduates, in which he went over Piscator's Aphorisms and Woollebins' 
Compend. Theol. Christ.; and by the way fairly propounded the principal objections 
made by the Papists, Socinians, and others against the orthodox doctrine in terms 
suited to the understanding and capacity of the younger scholars, and gave such 
clear and plain answers to them as detected their fallacies and established the truth. 

He took care likewise that the inferior servants of the College, and those who 
were employed about the meaner offices in it, should be instructed in the principles 
of the Christian religion, and would sometimes catechize them in his own lodgings. 
Now and then in the evening he would call into his parlour some of the students 
that applied themselves to Divinity, and explain to them, in course, a chapter of some 
of the darker Prophets, giving the logical analysis of it, and the natural sense of 
the words, with brief observations on the whole. He would give them the thoughts 

of learned men upon these prophecies By this method he would oblige 

them to the study of the Scriptures, and made this their study easy and delightful 
to them. 

Having thus taken care to plant true religion and promote piety in his College, 
his next endeavours were for the promoting good literature. He looked very 
strictly himself to the keeping up all exercises, and would often step into the hall 
in the midst of their lectures and disputations and see that they were performed 



INTRODUCTION. li 

with that accuracy and exactness as they ought to be. He would always oblige 
both opponents and respondents to come well prepared, and perform their respective 
parts agreeably to the strict laws of disputation. Here he would often interpose, 
either adding more force to the arguments of the opponent or more fulness to the 
answers of the respondents, and supplying where anything seemed defective, or 
clearing where anything was obscure in what the moderator subjoined. He would 
often go into the chambers and studies of the young scholars, observe what books 
they were reading, and reprove them if he found them turning over any modern 
authors, and sent them to Tully, that great master of Roman eloquence, to learn 
the true and genuine propriety of that language. Such as were idle, or of suspected 
morals, were sure to have his company very often, especially at late hours; and he 
would admonish such to keep company with none but those he should recommend, 
which always were such whose learning and virtuous inclinations had distinguished 
them in the House, and who might be a check to them as well as a guide. 

His care in the election of Fellows, on which so much depends the reputation and 
interest of a College, was very singular. A true love of learning, and a good share 
in it, in a person of untainted morals and low circumstances, were sure of his patron- 
age and encouragement. Whoever he was in whom these were found he stood in 
need of no letters or friends to Mr. Conant against the College elections, with whom 
worth alone and true statutable qualifications outweighed all interests and recom- 
mendations. What a happy effect this had upon the growth of the College, that 
there was no way to get the Rector's favour but by deserving it, is almost in- 
credible. 

He would constantly look over the observator's roll and buttery-book himself; and 
whoever had been absent from the Chapel prayers, or extravagant in his expenses, 
or otherwise faulty, was sure he must atone for his fault by some such exercise as 
the Hector should think fit to set him; for he was no friend to pecuniary mulcts, 
which too often punish the father instead of the son. 

Exeter College flourished so much under the government of Mr. Conant that the 
students were many more than could be lodged within the walls; they crowded in 
here from all parts of the nation, and some from beyond the sea, where the fame of 
Exeter College discipline had reached. It would be tedious to reckon up those 
eminent persons in Church and State that were bred up under his care. Exeter 
College, in his time, afforded a Vice-Chancellor, a Proctor, a Doctor of the Chair of 
Divinity, a Reader of Moral Philosophy and of Rhetoric to the University, a Presi- 
dent to St. John's, a Principal to Jesus, and a Divine and Professor to Magdalen 
College ; not to mention such as were transplanted hence to Scholarships and Fellow- 
ships in other Colleges, many of whom were men of eminence afterwards. 

Space forbids the insertion of the numerous additional proofs of 
Conant's virtues given in the Life, and we must be content with 
the following passages, in relation to his conduct as Vice-Chancellor, 
which bear more immediately on the subject. 



Hi INTRODUCTION. 

The first Lent he made a surprising reform in their public disputations, which 
for some years had been managed with such vehemency and disorder as had created 
several unhappy divisions in the University. Dr. Conant was a great friend to dis- 
putations, and therefore dreaded the consequence of entirely taking away these 
Lent exercises, which had been found, by long experience, to have been a great in- 
centive to learned emulation. By degrees he so corrected these disorders, and pre- 
vailed upon the philosophical gladiators, that they were willing to be reduced to a 
just temper. His frequent presence at many other of the public exercises, while he 
sat at the helm of the University, contributed much to the supporting the dignity 
and solemnity of them. 

He used frequently to take his rounds at late hours to ferret the young students 
from public and suspected houses. It was not the quality or degree of the persons 
taken in these circuits that would excuse them to the Vice-Chancellor, who could 
not betray the trust which the University had deposed in him, or wink at what was 
punishable by the statutes. 

We have here more than a picture ; it is a photograph. It is more 
than the record of the work of one man ; we may fairly accept it 
as one aspect of the work done by the Visitation. If we may well 
doubt whether there were many Conants, we can hardly refuse 
to see that this was the sort of work, the ideal in the minds of 
the Visitors, at which their Orders and Regulations aimed. Some 
of these, like some of Conant's minute acts of supervision, startle 
us by their adaptation to a state of things with which we are little 
familiar. But of course we must not judge those times by our own; 
and the question is how far these people succeeded. Of this we 
shall be better able to judge later on. 

In confirmation of what has been already said, this chapter may 
fitly conclude with the remark that we seem to be introduced in 
Conant's Memoirs to a University going on very much in a normal 
and accustomed style, worked up indeed into unusual industry and 
correctness of morals by a vigorous religious machinery, but not 
conveying the idea of a period of interruption and suspension, or 
of an isolated period, still less one to be forgotten and wiped 
out as unworthy to take rank with others. And it may be ob- 
served that this is exactly what strikes the reader of Wood's 
own Life, or Diary, written at the time, or from notes taken 
at the time, and not published by himself, or, indeed, for many 



INTRODUCTION. Hii 

years after his death. This book presents a remarkable contrast 
to his Annals and Athence, which were published by himself, 
and were written during the reigns of the later Stuarts, when the 
previous period was invariably painted by University men in the 
darkest colours. The same thing is to be observed as to all his 
sources of information. The papers of which he makes use in the 
Annals for this period are honestly given in his MSS. preserved 
in the Bodleian. They were most of them supplied by Archbishop 
Sheldon, and largely consist of Barlow's letters or comments, highly 
coloured with Cavalier sentiments, or of similar diaries from other 
members of Colleges. Wood incorporates these wholesale. The 
same process is notoriously followed in the Athente, where he was 
of course largely dependent on information received from persons in 
whom he had confidence for facts, but of violent opinions like his 
own. The tone is always that of the later Caroline period. In the 
Life, on the contrary, we see the eccentric young scholar fairly 
well contented with the existing government under the Visitation ; 
returning, indeed, an evasive answer when summoned, at the age 
of 16, to subscribe his Submission to the Visitors, but instantly per- 
suaded by his mother and brother to withdraw it; performing all 
the necessary duties and exercises of his standing; accepting a 
small office under his brother, who was Proctor; and devoting all 
the time he could spare from his precocious study of antiquities 
and heraldry to his beloved music. To this Life we owe many 
graphic touches, illustrative of the times ; but its chief value is its 
unconscious testimony to the steady work on the old lines performed 
under the auspices of the Commonwealth. The same unconscious 
testimony, as far as it goes, is afforded by Evelyn's visit to Oxford 
in 1654. He was present at the " Act," and observed that the 
" ancient ceremonies " used in creating Doctors were " not yet 
wholly abolished." He finds New College Chapel " in its ancient 
garb, notwithstanding the scrupulositie of the times ; " and Mag- 
dalen College Chapel " likewise in pontifical order, the altar only, 

CAMD. SOC. h 



liv INTRODUCTION. 

I think, turned table-wise, and there was still the double organ/' 
Diary, July 10, 1654. 

The next chapter will afford us an opportunity of observing the 
difficulties which confronted the authorities of the Commonwealth 
in carrying through their Visitation. The mere relation of the 
facts as they occurred, from the surrender of Oxford to the com- 
mencement of the actual government of the University by the new 
authorities, will enable us to form a judgment as to the alleged 
cruelty so confidently charged by Wood against the Visitors. 
" Such cruelty," says he, " was there showed, such tyranny acted 
by the clergy-visitors, and such alterations made by them, that never 
the like no, not in those various times from King Henry VIII. 
to Queen Elizabeth, was ever seen or heard of." (Annals, 1648.) 
Kemembering how much the Universities themselves had to do with 
the Reformation effected under the Tudor Dictators, and that there 
was then no Civil War, the elements of a just comparison are wholly 
wanting. We have now, on the contrary, to watch the University 
of Oxford exhibiting an attitude of the most formidable hostility, 
and presenting a very different obstacle to the hand of authority 
from what had to be surmounted at the Reformation. Cambridge, 
indeed, had long ago, while the war was raging, been dragooned 
into obedience, in a decidedly military fashion, several Heads of 
Houses having been most barbarously treated.* Oxford, the centre 
of a struggle only just concluded, and still palpitating under its 
effects, was allowed to hold out for nearly two years after the sur- 
render of the City, before any decisive means of establishing the 
authority of the Government were applied. Obstruction, resistance, 
defiance, were consummately organized by some of the ablest men 
the University had ever produced. The question rather arises 
how it came to pass that a triumphant military power exercised 
such conspicuous forbearance. The scene opens with the Univer- 
sity at bay, and the hunters closing round it. 

* See Querela Cantalrigiensig, Oxford, 1646. 



INTRODUCTION. lv 



CHAPTER III. 

THE UNIVERSITY ON ITS DEFENCE. 
16461648. 

The Surrender of Oxford to Sir Thomas Fairfax, which may be 
called the concluding act of the Civil War, took place on June 24, 
1646. But the Visitation of the University was not ordered by 
the " Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament " till May 1st, 
1647; the Visitors' " Register" does not commence till September 
30th, 1647, nor does it become continuous till March 17th, 1647-8. 
We have thus to account for an interval of nearly two years, ten 
months of which elapsed between the Surrender and the Visitation, 

and eleven months before the Visitors succeeded in causing their 

o 

presence to be effectually felt in the University. The present 
chapter will cover that period. 

When the Surrender took place there was no real question as to 
its' necessity. From a military point of view the defence might 
have been a little prolonged, but the cause was absolutely hopeless. 
Able negotiators obtained the best terms that could be procured, 
better than could have been procured in any ordinary case, for 
Oxford City and University were common property, and Fairfax 
had already proved, at Winchester and elsewhere, his respect for 
the sacred inheritance by which he had himself signally benefited. 
These are the words of his summons to Sir Thomas Glemham, the 
governor : 

May 11, 1648. 
SIB, 

I do by these summon you to deliver up the city of Oxford into my hands for the 
use of the Parliament. I very much desire the preservation of that place, so famous 
for learning, from ruin, which inevitably is like to fall upon it unless yon concur. 
You may have honourable terms for yourself and all within the garrison if you 
reasonably accept thereof. I desire your answer this day, and remain 

Your servant, 

THO. FAIRFAX. 



Ivi INTRODUCTION. 

The Treaty of Surrender contained accordingly provisions which 
are of importance in reference to subsequent events. The careful 
observer of the facts of the case will note that the University was 
as much consulted in the matter as circumstances permitted. It 
was quite out of the question that each Head and member of a 
College should be made a party to the Surrender. The mere state- 
ment of such a claim is absurd. But it would seem that many of 
those who afterwards declined to submit held that this omission of 
a separate consent to the Articles of Surrender gave them a title 
to disclaim any obligation imposed by those Articles. It does not 
seem that they scrupled to take advantage of such protection as 
they gained from them both at the time and afterwards. It will be 
enough here to quote the special article relating to the University : 

Art. 14. That the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Oxford, 
and the Governors and Students of Christchurch of King Henry VIII. his founda- 
tion, and all other Heads and Governors, Masters, Fellows, and Scholars of the 
Colleges, Halls, and Bodies Corporate, and Societies of the same University, and 
the Public Professors and Readers, and the Orator thereof, and all other persons 
belonging to the said University, or to any Colleges or Halls therein, shall and may, 
according to their statutes, charters, and customs, enjoy their ancient form of 
government, subordinate to the immediate authority and power of Parliament : and 
that all their rights, &c. (except such rents and revenues as have been already taken 
and received by ordinance of Parliament), shall be enjoyed by them respectively, as 
aforesaid, free from sequestrations, fines, taxes, and all other molestations what- 
soever for or under colour of anything whatsoever relating to this present war or to 
the unhappy differences between his Majesty and the Parliament : And that all 
churches, chapels, colleges, &c. shall be preserved from defacing and spoil: And 
if any removal shall be made by the Parliament of any Head or other members of 
the University, &c. that those so removed shall enjoy their profits during the space 
of six months after the rendering of Oxford, &c. Provided that this shall not extend 
to any reformation there intended by the Parliament, nor give them any liberty to 
intermeddle in the government. 

This proviso announced the deliberate intention of the victorious 
Parliament to " reform. " the University, and conveyed a very dis- 
tinct intimation that no opposition would be tolerated. It im- 
plied that a Visitation would take place, such as had previously at 
different periods occurred, and that all concerned were engaged to 



INTRODUCTION. Ivii 

submit to it. Under that condition, and " subordinate to the 
immediate authority and power of Parliament," all was to go on 
as before. This must be borne in mind. Harsh as the new Govern- 
ment seemed to the conquered party, distressing as the conflict of 
principles must have been to so many honourable and conscientious 
men, intimately bound up, as the University was, with Church and 
King, yet the terms of submission were explicit ; and it is difficult 
to understand how, on the principles of the Great Rebellion, and 
under the obligations of the Solemn League and Covenant, the 
Negative Oath, and the Ordinance concerning Discipline and Wor- 
ship, the authority of those in power could have been left unex- 
ercised. It was a government of force, force administered on very 
distinct principles. 

Nor did the precedents of University history afford any ground 
for the opinion that the absolute independence of a literary republic 
could be claimed as a right. The boast of Oxford and Cambridge 
has always been that they are national, and within certain bounds 
their independence has always been recognised. But this privilege 
never extended to questions of change of dynasty or religion ; if it 
had, they would have ceased to be national. They were not to be 
" paternally governed," not to be interfered with except when 
gross abuses cried for redress; but an imperium in imperio could 
not be tolerated. Whatever form the Government of the country 
took, that must be the Government of the Universities of Oxford 
and Cambridge. 

It is, then, from a military as well as from a national point of 
view that we must regard the events subsequent to the Treaty. On 
both points there was room for different estimates of the position. 
The Cavaliers asserted as a matter of principle that they could not 
be called on to submit to reform or change of government by any- 
one except the King. The military situation made no difference; 
while as a matter of policy every delay that could possibly be con- 
trived offered the party the advantage of dividing its enemies, and 
of giving it the chance of profiting by any turn of events which 



Iviii INTRODUCTION. 

might occur in its favour. On the other hand, the Parliamen- 
tarians held that the battle had been completely fought out, and 
that the Universities, like the nation, had simply to submit to the 
conqueror. The military situation was the dominant feature, but the 
national point of view was never absent from their vision. The 
principles of the Great Rebellion were to be triumphant in every 
part of the land. One University had been reduced to a fit state 
for propagating those principles ; the other must follow. 

It must be admitted that the task of setting the University in 
order, after such a period of war and confusion as had just termi- 
nated, must have been sufficiently arduous, even if it had been left 
to the ordinary authorities. It may, indeed, be doubted whether 
success would have been at all more speedily obtained under their 
management than it was under the Visitation. Wood gives a com- 
pendious account of the state of things, which is confirmed by all other 
authorities, when he tells us how " the University was exhausted 
of its treasure, and that little could be procured abroad for its sub- 
sistence," how " its rents were in a miserable condition," how it was 
" deprived of its number of sons," how " lectures and exercises had 
for the most part ceased," how " those few scholars that were re- 
maining were for the most part, especially such that were young, 
much debauched, and become idle by their bearing arms and keep- 
ing company with rude soldiers," how " the Colleges were out of 
repair, their treasure and plate gone, the books of some libraries 
embezzled, the chambers in the Halls rented out to laics." tl In a 
word there was scarce the face of an University left, all things being 
out of order and disturbed." a 

a Some Colleges did not even recover for very many years after the Restoration. 
Warton, who wrote in 1761, giving an anecdote of the old age and dotage of Dr. 
Bathurst, President of Trinity, speaks thus of Balliol : " Balliol College had suffered 
so mnch in the outrages of the Grand Rehellion that it remained almost in a state of 
desolation for some years after the Restoration a circumstance not to be suspected 
from its flourishing condition ever since. Dr. Bathnrst, who had restored his own 
College from the ruinous state in which it had been left, was, perhaps, secretly 
pleased to see a neighbouring, and once a rival, Society reduced to this condition, 



INTRODUCTION. lix 

The very first Order received from Parliament was to inhibit, 
" till the pleasure of Parliament be made known therein," elections 
to places of preferment, and the making or renewal of leases. 
This was resisted by the University, and voted to be contrary 
to the Articles of Surrender, it is riot easy to see how. But 
the Parliament could not make up its mind at once to a Visita- 
tion. It had been strangely misinformed as to the temper of the 
University. It hoped for the best without much ground for hope. 
Its first resolution was to make a strenuous effort to preach the mal- 
contents into submission an admirable plan, if only people would 
listen. Seven Oxford men, who had become Presbyterian ministers, 
were sent on this errand. Reynolds, as we have seen, was one ; 
Henry Wilkinson, senior, and Cheynell. the two next in importance, 
then Harris, Corbet, Cornish and Langley. They were, as might 
have been expected, received with scorn and laughter, " their pray- 
ing and preaching being altogether contrary to that lately used." Yet, 
by their sermons and conferences, they so far succeeded as to gather 
round them a considerable party in the University. They reported 
to Parliament their mode of proceeding. One of their objects was, 
as they said, to " prepare the citizens and scholars for the Holy Com- 
munion of the Body and Blood of Christ," which is observable, 
since there is a good deal of evidence that this did not form any 
great part of their system when they were established in power, or 
at any rate that it was much neglected. 3 

This plan of " preparing a way for a Visitation " would have 
had a better chance if it had not aroused the jealous rivalry of the 
Independents now in Oxford, especially of the " Seekers," who felt 
that preaching was their especial vocation, and who had also the 

while his own flourished above all others." The old man was found (it must have 
been towards the end of the seventeenth century) one afternoon in his garden, throw- 
ing stones at the windows of Balliol, " as if happy to complete its ruin." {Life of 
Bathnrst, p. 203.) 

a Bloxanvs Register of Magdalen College; Sir L. Jenkins's Life of Dr. Mansell, 
On the other hand, see Ath. Ox. vol. iv. p. 226, for a notice of Samuel Parker con- 
stantly " receiving the Sacrament at a Presbyterian meeting-house." 



Ix INTRODUCTION. 

advantage of possessing an abundance of fanatical soldiers on the spot. 
These men, if they lacked theological training, atoned for the want 
by their fiery zeal; and it was a common spectacle to see the military 
saints mounting the pulpit. On the Presbyterian side Cheynell was 
the only man " who could oppose frenzy to frenzy "; and of course the 
most unseemly contests took place. It was no wonder that the City 
and University became more demoralized than ever. " Hell was 
broke loose among them," said some. The " loyal party that could 
not broach these matters either left the University or absconded in 
their respective houses till they could know their doom by the ap- 
proaching Visitation." The failure of the scheme had at least one 
advantage ; it led some to feel that even such order as the dominant 
party might elicit, by regular though forcible methods, was better 
than anarchy. 

So passed the autumn of 1646 and spring of 1647, the only 
academical event of importance being the resumption of his office as 
Chancellor by Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, the same 
who had contested the election with Laud in 1630, who, on Laud's 
resignation, had been elected in his place in 1641, and whom the 
King and University had deposed from his office, in 1643, in order 
to make room for the Marquis of Hertford. But he was as yet power- 
less. The Parliament had committed a fatal error, from their point 
of view, in suffering nearly a year to elapse after the Surrender 
before commencing the Visitation. The University was completely 
organised against them. 

With the summer, however, Parliament began to take the matter 
seriously in hand. The King was in their power ; the Presby- 
terians as yet in the ascendant. On May 1, 1647, an Ordinance 
was passed " for the Visitation and Eeformation of the University 
of Oxford, and the several Colleges and Halls therein; " and its object 
was more fully stated to be " the due correction of offences, abuses, 
and disorders, especially of late times, committed there." For this 
purpose twenty-four Visitors were appointed, fourteen laymen and 
ten clergymen : five of them were to be a quorum. But of these 



INTRODUCTION. Ixi 

twenty-four only a few appear to have acted, and the laymen 
speedily dropped out, leaving the work to the Presbyterian clergy. 
Sir Nathaniel Brent was selected as Chairman. 

Brent, when Vicar-General of England and Judge of the Prero- 
gative Court, as well as Warden of Merton, had formerly been a 
strong supporter of the party in power ; but he had gradually sepa- 
rated himself from the Court, had sided with the Parliament, and, 
having accepted the Covenant, was ejected from Merton by the 
King in 1645. He thus made room for the Royalist Dr. Harvey, 
the King's physician, and the famous discoverer of the circulation of 
the blood. When Oxford was surrendered Brent resumed his 
Wardenship ; and, as may be supposed, somewhat irritated by what 
had taken place, had turned his whole attention to the " reform " 
of his College. The large proportion of " Submitters" which 
Merton supplied in 1648 may be a proof of his success. He was 
thus a very natural person to be chosen at the head of the Visitors, 
who took up their quarters for some time at his College. To that 
College also belonged several leading men of the new government, 
Reynolds, Cheynell, Corbet, Copley, and Button. Two of these 
had already been committed to serious conflicts with Laud during 
his Chancellorship: Cheynell had been punished for disobeying 
the truly Byzantine " Declaration" of 1628 prefixed to the Thirty- 
nine Articles; Corbet had refused to " bow towards the Altar."* 
Brent, as soon as Reynolds was admitted Vice-Chancellor, became 
a less important person, and when the Presbyterian element 
gradually succumbed to the Independents he separated from his 
colleagues: but they soon found means to eject him from his 
Wardenship. This was in 1650. 

The names of the other Visitors were as follows : Edward Corbet, 
of Merton; John Pulixton, of the Middle Temple; Henry Wilkin- 
son, sen.; William Prynne, of Lincoln's Inn; William Typping; 
Sir William Cobbe, knight; John Greenwood; Doctor John Wil- 

a Reg. Conv. T., April 12th, 1648. Laud's Works, vol. v. part i. p. 205; and 
Hist, of Troubles and Trial, chap, xxxiii. 
CAMD. SOC. i 



INTRODUCTION. 

kinson, Principal of Magdalen Hall; Edward Reynolds, of Merton; 
Robert Harris, of Magdalen Hall; Francis Cheynell, of Merton; 
John Packer; John Mills, of Christ Church; Christopher Rogers, 
Principal of New Inn Hall; William Cope; Bartholomew Hall, of 
the Middle Temple; Thomas Knight, of Lincoln's Inn; John 
Heylin, of Gray's Inn; William Draper, of Nether Worton, Esq.; 
Gabriel Beck, of Lincoln's Inn ; John Cartwright, of Aynho, Esq. ; 
and Samuel Dunch, of Pusey, Esq. It will be observed that only 
a minority of these were persons of any importance. 

The powers bestowed on the Visitors must next engage our atten- 
tion. First of all they are empowered to take the same steps as former 
Visitors, and this is the most important point. Next they are " to 

inquire by oath concerning those that neglect to take the 

Solemn League and Covenant, and the Negative Oath, and that 
oppose the execution of the Ordinances of Parliament concerning 
the discipline and the Directory .... and likewise concerning those 
that shall teach or write against any point of doctrine the ignorance 
whereof doth exclude from the Sacrament of the Lords Supper." 
Then follow further powers to "inquire and report upon such as 
have borne arms against the Parliament." These persons, it would 
seem, had not been specified in the exemptions mentioned in the 
Treaty of Surrender, because all such persons had been ipso facto 
expelled, and granted a safe-conduct out of the City at its capture. 
Finally an Appeal was provided to a " Committee of Lords and 
Commons," who are named in the same document. They consist 
of 78 persons, 26 Lords and 52 members of the House of Com- 
mons, amongst whom the name of the Earl of Northumberland 
stands first. The best known names on the Parliamentary side 
compose the list, but the only one of these which appears pro- 
minent in the history of the Visitation after its first starting is 
that of Francis Rous, who invariably signs as Chairman. This 
is the well-known Parliamentarian of the reigns of James and 
Charles, and a leader in the Parliaments of the Commonwealth. 
He was one of the Assembly of Divines, (Parliamentary) Provost of 



INTRODUCTION. Ixiii 

Eton, the chief " Trier of Preachers," the author of several theo- 
logical works, and one of Cromwell's " Lords."* This " Standing 
Committee," of which, like the body of Visitors, five were to be a 
quorum, did not long preserve harmonious relations with their col- 
leagues, but soon began to contend for the direct government of the 
University, and so materially added to the difficulties in which 
the Visitors were involved. 

These latter dignitaries were not fortunate in their commencement 
on May 15, 1647. They made known their mission by a citation 
to the University to appear in Convocation before them between 9 
and 11 a.m. on June 4 ; but they were too much alarmed at a mutiny 
which took place amongst the soldiers of the Parliamentary garrison 
of Oxford to appear there before the very day fixed ; and this gave 
time for the deliberate organisation of measures of resistance. When 
they did appear the Vice-Chancellor (Samuel Fell) and the doctors 
took a clever advantage of the long sermon preached by Harris. 
Declining the sermon they mustered in the Convocation House, 
and the Visitors not having arrived by 1 1 they left the House pre- 
cisely as the clock struck. Their procession meeting that of the 
Visitors in the Proscholium, on its way to the House, the Bedell 
audaciously cried, " Room for Mr. Vice-Chancellor." The Visitors 
being taken unawares, gave place. As they passed, the Vice-Chan- 
cellor " very civilly moved his cap to them, saying, ' Good morrow, 
gentlemen, 'tis past eleven of the clock,' and so passed on, without 
taking any further notice of them." 

The Visitors had, in fact, only just been made aware of the fierce 
opposition which awaited them. During the delay of their arrival 
a Delegacy had been appointed by Convocation to deal with the 
Visitors, of whom the best known are Samuel Fell, Sheldon (the 
future Primate), Hammond, Morley, and Sanderson. To the able 

a He was the son of Sir Anthony Rons, had been a Commoner of Broadgates 
Hall, and at his death, in 1658-9 (Jan. 7), left a benefaction to his old Hall, then 
Pembroke College. 



bdv INTRODUCTION. 

hands of the last-named, and to Dr. Zouch (lor the legal part), was 
entrusted the drawing-up of the " Judgment" or " Reasons of the 
University " for objecting to the tests about to be imposed upon 
them. a These Seasons, accepted by Convocation, but soon petitioned 
against by the " Puritanical party in the University, of which by 
this time there were great store," are well known, and are generally 
reckoned a consummate model of skilful pleading and moderate 
statement. On the principles of the Cavaliers they were unanswer- 
able. They are of much too great length to be inserted in this 
place, as would be otherwise desirable, since most of the numerous 
negative answers in the Register, delivered to the questions of the 
Visitors, may be traced back more or less clearly to this source. The 
reader may see them in Sanderson's Works, and some remarks upon 
them in Isaac Walton's Life of that great man. With much 
wisdom when the prejudices entertained as to Oxford teaching are 
remembered the doctrine which the University avows is here 
described as " the true Protestant religion expressed in the doctrine 
of the Church of England ;" and Episcopacy is said to be, " if not 
Jure Divino in the strictest sense, that is to say, expressly com- 
manded by God in his Word, yet of Apostolical Institution." It 
concludes so that there shall be no mistake by asserting that " if 
any one single sample or reason in any the premises [of which there 
are several score] remain unsatisfied, though we should receive full 
consideration in all the rest, the conscience would also remain un- 
satisfied. And in that case it cannot be lawful for us 

that cannot be satisfied to submit to the said Covenant, Oath, and 
Ordinances." It may here be remarked that this " Judgment of 
the University" was made the subject of special and solemn thanks 
by the Parliament held in Oxford in 1665. 

Not only were the Visitors hampered by this organised resistance 
flaunting in their faces the "Reasons" which served it for a 

a Wood's Annals; Jacobson's Sanderson's Worfo, Pref. p. XTii. and authorities 
there quoted. 



INTRODUCTION. Ixv 

rallying standard, and which arranged, for each case that might occur, 
what answers should be given on citation, not only were their 
public notices torn down and trampled under foot with every mark 
of scorn, but the struggle between the Presbyterians and Inde- 
pendents, brought to a point by the seizure of the King at Holmby, 
on the very same day as the failure in Convocation (June 4th), 
completely paralysed their action for some three months. This was 
an interval quite fatal to any success by fair means, if that indeed 
had been possible. As the University now insisted that a fresh Cita- 
tion was necessary, though the Visitors would not admit it, it was 
seen that they must have fresh powers before they could even 
obtain a hearing. Cheynell appears to have been instrumental in 
the settlement of this matter with the Committee of Lords and 
Commons. An " Additional Ordinance " was now sent to the 
Visitors from this body, containing special powers to administer the 
Solemn League and Covenant, and the Negative Oath, to send for 
books, statutes, and accounts, to imprison the contumacious, to 
impanel persons to inquire and present for offences and examine 
witnesses, to employ a " Register " and other officers, and to demand 
aid from sheriffs, mayors, &c. To this was appended power, in 
spite of any former adjournment, to begin at once with the Heads 
of Houses and Canons of Christchurch, and that they should " not 
only visit, but reform an d regulate the University ; and therefore that 
none that were within the compass of the Articles agreed as for the 
surrender of Oxford ought (especially considering that their six 
months were expired nine months since) to intermeddle with the 
government of the University whilst 'tis under a Visitation." These 
are further expanded by an Order of September 24th, giving power 
to pronounce definite sentence on offenders, and to " consider of the 
lawfulness and fitness of such oaths as are enjoined by any statute 
or custom of the said University, or any College, &c., presenting 
their judgment [in this case] to the said Committee," also to inquire 
" whether any have taught, allowed, or published any Arminian, 
Socinian, or Popish errors ; " and as to those who had been in any 



Ixvi INTRODUCTION. 

way concerned in the late war, either in their own person or by 
their advice. 

These most ample powers were accompanied by a letter from the 
Lords Pembroke and Montgomery, Kent, Manchester, and Mulgrave, 
and E. Leigh, F. Ecus, and H. Salwey, Esqrs., in the name of the 
Committee, informing the Visitors that as they are "now suffi- 
ciently enabled" and "secured" they are "expected to act vigor- 
ously," and that all necessary moneys will be provided for them. 
Their " Commission under the Great Seal " bore the name of the 
King, but this was at once pronounced by the University to be a 
mere fiction, as indeed it was. 

Thus armed, the Visitors commenced operations on September 
29th, 1647, by public prayers and preaching for three hours together, 
" a way," says the bitter Annalist, "which had for several years 
behind been used by the faction to promote rebellion, and by it 
to commence their actions for all sorts of wickednesses." Henry 
Wilkinson's sermon was so violent that " divers persons, being not 
able to bear it, departed," a bad beginning. The notice of Visi- 
tation was now affixed to the door of St. Mary's church, and on 
September 30th we at last find the Register commenced. The 
three opening Orders are: (1) A Summons to all the Heads of 
Houses, to send in their statutes, books, and accounts ; (2) An 
Order for Dr. Fell, the Vice-Chancellor's, special personal appear- 
ance; and (3) The appointment of Mr. Button, and " divers worthy 
gentlemen," as assistants to the Visitors in each College or Hall. 
These last were to inquire and report to the Visitors on the members 
of each Society respectively. 

We have thus arrived at the third stage of the Parliamentary 
government of the University. The first period of " preparation " 
had been succeeded by that of unsuccessful, abortive Visitation. 
There was yet one more phase to be witnessed before the personal 
interposition of the Chancellor was to be called in, along with the 
rough methods of Cromwell's troopers. If the Heads of Houses, 
now that they saw the Visitation commenced like any former 



INTRODUCTION. Ixvii 

Visitation, would recognise the power of the Parliament de facto, 
the " reformation " might yet be worked through their hands. 
But this was precisely what they felt they could not do. The King 
was a prisoner; no Visitation not sanctioned by him could pos- 
sibly be legal; and they would admit nothing short of his own 
order. The renewed conflict only lasts for a few days; and then 
once more the Register is silent, and silent for more than five 
months together. 

A difficulty was still felt, at least in London, about the terms of 
the Treaty of Surrender. This had been much pressed by mem- 
bers of the University. Cheynell is deputed to see the London 
Committee on this point; and seems to have succeeded in over- 
coming their scruples, for we hear no more of them. But the 
Heads of Houses, with the exception of Dr. Fell, are determined 
to proceed in strict order, and to meet law by law. They appear to 
summons, but are far from bringing their College books. They 
insist on seeing the Commission of the Visitors, which, when seen, 
they at once repudiate, and retire. On October 8th the formal reply 
of the University is delivered in by the hands of the Proctors. This 
is a dignified and becoming document. Declining to commit them- 
selves to the " multiplied perjuries " which submission to any but 
the King would involve, they say that " we hope the honourable 
Houses will suffer us to enjoy what, by the laws of the land (which 
is the birthright of the subject) as well as the privileges of the 
University, is due unto us, "until we shall have made a legal for- 
feiture of it before such as are our proper and competent judges." 

Dr. Fell on the other hand absolutely refused to put in any 
appearance. To the repeated orders of the Visitors he turned a 
deaf ear ; and as he was the chief dignitary of the University there 
was nothing else for it but to obtain an order from London for his 
appearance there, which was followed by his seizure and imprison- 
ment. Wood ascribes his exceptional attitude to the scorn and 
horror be felt for a Commission composed of men so " inconsider- 
able," and, except Brent, so much junior to himself. Mills, one of 



Ixviii INTRODUCTION. 

the Visitors, was a Student of Christ Church : was he, the Dean 
and Vice-Chancellor, " to stand bare to his scholar? " His attitude 
was not perhaps so inconsistent with the character which Laud had 
once given of him as might appear at first sight. He behaved in- 
judiciously in a trouble which arose during Laud's Chancellorship 
in 1639, and is spoken of by the Chancellor as " a sudden, hasty, 
and weak man." a The fact is that he was resolute to a fault, but 
it was in standing to a course which was taken up on insufficient 
grounds. His colleagues placed themselves in a much more de- 
fensible position. 

The University Clerk and Bedells showed a spirit similar to that of 
Fell. Nothing could induce them to give up the keys, or the gold 
and silver staves of office. The last refusal especially vexed the 
Visitors, for the outward dignity of academical processions was 
grievously maimed. We hear of this very frequently afterwards; 
nor were the staves recovered for two years. The refusal of the 
" Register," Mr. French of Merton, to produce the Register of the 
University, was more successfully dealt with. The Visitors them- 
selves seized it in his room. They also succeeded in upholding 
the appointment of a Master of Pembroke, Henry Langley, formerly 
of Magdalen, in the vacancy made by the death of Dr. Thomas 
Clayton, as against that of Henry Wightwick, whom the College 
had elected in defiance of them. 

But here their success ended. The immediate difficulty was 
that there was no resident head of the University, no regular 
Vice-Chancellor. Parliament had made their plans on the suppo- 
sition that the existing authorities would act under the Visitors, 
and were unwilling to supersede them. It was still hoped that 
Fell's case was exceptional; but Dr. Potter, President of Trinity, 
who had been deputed by Fell to hold the office of Pro- Vice- 
Chancellor, would not succumb any more than Fell. b He retains 

Works, vol. v. part i. p. 224. 

h The sense of the difficulty caused by the absence of a Vice-Chancellor is equally 
felt on both sides. Among the Wood MSS. (F. 35) is an interesting letter from 



INTRODUCTION. 

the keys and books of his office; Convocation meets under his 
presidency just as usual ; Term goes on just as if the Visitors had 
not prorogued it ; the Readers (or Professors) had been ordered to 
cease from the delivery of their lectures, but they take no heed ; 
in fact, a sudden zeal for lecturing seizes them. The Visitors, in 
short, find themselves altogether outside the University, and might 
just as well not be Visitors. They now (October llth) demand a 
second interview with the Heads of Houses, but obtain nothing what- 
ever beyond a respectful refusal to surrender the College books to 
any but the lawful Visitor of each Society. No resource is left, 
or seems to be left, in spite of the ample powers which had been 
received, but to send Brent and Wilkinson to report progress, and 
to beg a " speedy supply of the office of Vice-Chancellor " from the 
Committee of Parliament. The scene is consequently changed to 
the metropolis, and we must now follow the proceedings of that 
Committee. 

The feebleness of the Visitors at this juncture, when their new 
powers had been scarcely at all as yet employed, cannot be accounted 
for by the mere absence of a Vice-Chancellor, or by the attitude 
of the contumacious authorities. But it is intelligible when we 
remember the bitterness of the struggle which was now going on 
between the Presbyterian portion of the successful party on the one 
side and the Independents and Sectaries on the other, as also the 
attitude of the King and his advisers with reference to both parties. 
It was, in fact, not till some time after Charles's rigid imprisonment 
at Carisbrook that the weight still felt to attach to the connection 
between the Crown and the University was sufficiently removed 
to enable the new Governors to act with effect. The King was 

Barlow, of Queen's, of about this date, to Sheldon " at the Court," bewailing the 
state of the University in being left ajcspaXoi in consequence of Dr. Fell " being 
ravished from us by a pursuivant," and consulting Sheldon in the most deferential, 
not to say obsequious, manner as to whether Dr. Potter, the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, 
should summon a Convocation, so as to combine and commit the whole University to 
a definite method of resistance. Sheldon, in concert with Selden, evidently managed 
the whole of the proceedings which have just been described. 
CAMD. SOC. k 



xx INTRODUCTION. 

at this time still a power. At this very date, " about October 13th," 
he wrote to Sir Thomas Fairfax as follows : 

It is his Majesty's earnest desire that his Excellency would effectually recom- 
mend this Answer of the University of Oxon to the serious and charitable consi- 
deration of both Houses of Parliament, to the end that this being the case of those 
of the University, that they cannot without perjury submit to the intended Visita- 
tion, it may be no further pressed upon them. But if it be doubted whether what 
is here suggested be a pretence only, and no real truth, that then the examination 
thereof may be referred to Mr. Selden, the Burgess of the University, to make 
report. 

The Pro-Vice-Chancellor and other Heads of Houses still refusing 
repeated citations which the humiliated Visitors still vainly make,* 
they are at last forced to appear before the Committee of Parlia- 
ment on November llth; but even then they had a reprieve till 
the 15th, occasioned by the flight of the King from Hampton 
Court and the general confusion, which for a moment suspended 
operations. On that day, however, now joined by Dr. Fell, they 
confront the Committee, and are baited by Lord Pembroke and 
Montgomery, the Chancellor, a man, says Wood, " so foul-mouthed 
and so eloquent in swearing that he was thought more fit to preside 
a Bedlam than a learned academy." Fell had to bear the brunt of 
the storm. b The Chancellor told him that " the devil had made 
him Vice-Chancellor," " that it was fit he should be whipped, 
nay, hanged." But there were wiser heads than Pembroke's on the 

a The following extract from the answer of Oriel College, under the signature of 
Robert Say, the Dean, in the absence of the Provost, to an Order of the Visitors re- 
quiring them to send in their books and accounts, may serve as a specimen of the 
replies given : 

f . ' Wee doe humbly conceive that we cannot give that satisfaction unto the par- 
ticulars in {he said summons (as otherwise wee desire to doe) without unavoydable 
violation of our oaths, which (besides the violence would bee thereby done unto our 
own consciences) doth at the same instant, according to our said Statutes, utterly 
Divest us of any right onto or benefit from the said Colledge, which is the principall 
maintenance of every one of us, of which (being so much concerned therein) we 
cannot suffer ourselves to make a legall forfeiture." Archives of Oriel College. 
Supplied by the kindness of C. L. Shadwell, Esq. M.A. B.C.L. 

b His letter to Sheldon describing the scene is in Wood's MSS. (f . 35.) 



INTRODUCTION. Ixxi 

Committee ; and at last the Oxford dignitaries were allowed a 
fortnight's time and the use of Counsel. Selden, who had done all 
in his power to mitigate the harshness of his colleagues in the 
Committee of Parliament, and had, indeed, gone so far as to advise 
the University as to the course it should pursue in resisting the 
Visitation, 4 stood forth as their champion. He now procured them 
permission to engage the celebrated Matthew Hale and Chaloner 
Chute, b of whose services, though previously secured, they had 
been at first most unjustly robbed. The notorious Bradshaw took 
the lead among the Counsel retained for the Committee. Dr. Morley, 
afterwards Bishop of Winchester, and one of the keenest intellects 
of his time, was selected to instruct the University Counsel. 

On the hearing of the case the weaker party found friends. Vane, 
Fiennes, Selden, and Whitlocke took their part, but the majority of 
the Committee, having voted the denial of the authority of Parlia- 
ment a " high contempt," proceeded to depose from their offices 
the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors ; lies, Gardiner, and Morley, Pre- 
bends (or Canons) of Christchurch ; Oliver, President of Magdalen ; 
Radcliffe, Principal of Brasenose ; Potter, President of Trinity; and 
Baylie, President of St. John's. Yet this was but a brulum fulmen. 
After all these solemn transactions, occupying several weeks, Wood 
reports thus: "These things being done, and their orders by 
command published, not a man stirred from his place or removed." 
When the Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Proctors were again ordered 
up to London, " to account for their proceedings in a late pre- 
tended Congregation or otherwise, in contempt of authority of Par- 
liament," they absconded. 

At last, on February 18th, 1647-8, the step is taken which had been 
so unaccountably delayed. Keynolds is appointed Vice-Chancellor 
by the Earl of Pembroke, and the Proctors, Waring and Hunt, are 
superseded by Crosse of Lincoln and Button of Merton. On March 8th 

Twells' Life o/Pocock, edit 1819, Tol. i. p. 110. 

b The first of the family who occupied the Vyne, near Basingstoke, in succession 
to the family of Lord Sandys. 



INTRODUCTION. 

the Chancellor is himself directed to instal them in office, to put 
Reynolds into the Deanery of Christchurch, and generally to see the 
orders of the Committee obeyed. Rogers, Henry Wilkinson, senior, 
and Langley, were to be instituted Prebends of Christchurch. 

It was indeed time that some authority should be established. 
The Visitors had been obliged during these five months to content 
themselves with the mortifying position of lookers-on, while the 
University ignored their presence. Their position was absolutely 
ridiculous. They had lately, for example, inhibited the Fellows of 
New College from electing a successor to their Warden, Dr. Pink, a 
leading man in the University, who died at this time; but the 
inhibition was laughed at. The Fellows immediately elected Dr. 
Stringer, the Greek Reader, to the Wardenship. Now at last the 
Visitors are ordered to use, however reluctantly, the military strength 
placed at their disposal, and can act through regular University 
officers, constituted under such law as the country was itself" 
governed by ; and so the Register of their Orders once more com- 
mences, on March 17th, 1647-8, and becomes continuous for some 
years. Encouraged by the near approach of the Chancellor, they set 
to work with an active resolution which marks that the patience 
of the Government had at last been entirely exhausted. 

It had thus, we see, taken very nearly two years to convince the 
Parliament that force was absolutely necessary, if the resistance of the 
University to the " reformation " they intended was to be subdued. 
No one could assert that it had not been " retarded " by the autho- 
rities in office, or that the new government had not been " inter- 
meddled" with; and these were the terms of the Treaty of Sur- 
render. Both parties command our respect, the one for its cou- 
rageous loyalty, the other for its patient moderation. The fact is 
that the time had arrived when one or the other must yield, and 
Parliament was uppermost. 

There were more reasons than one for bringing matters to an 
issue. Reynolds and the more judicious " reformers " could not 
but feel the pressure of the fanatics, who even already began to scent 



INTRODUCTION. Ixxiii 

from afar the entire spoliation of the Universities, the extirpation of 
the poisonous roots from which such deadly mischief, as they 
deemed, had proceeded in past ages. It was plain enough that the 
only hope of preserving these venerable institutions lay in fore- 
stalling such designs by a species of reform which might satisfy the 
great bulk of the party now in power. It is but common fairness 
to remember, when we are tracing the violent steps by which the 
University of Oxford was reduced to submission, this great leading 
consideration. It was a storm; and part of the cargo must be 
thrown overboard to save the ship. Whether enough of it was pre- 
served to make the voyage of any value must be judged by the 
sequel. The ship, at any rate, was not lost. The question who 
raised the storm, what brought on the Great Rebellion, who were 
really responsible for all this loss and danger, lies outside of the 
present inquiry. 

Before we proceed to trace the further progress of the Visitation, 
we may take such glances as are possible at the internal state of the 
Colleges at this period ; and we shall observe that there was a brighter 
side of the picture even in the dark interval of trouble and suspense. 
Not that there is much evidence forthcoming. It was not to be 
expected that any great or general recovery from disorder should 
take place under the circumstances ; but, where there happened to be 
in any College a remarkable man available, he made his presence felt. 

Thus we find Fell, in his Life of Hammond, describing that great 
man, during the imprisonment of Dr. Samuel Fell, the Dean, as 
coming to the front and devoting all his energies to the care of 
Christchurch, in which he had lately obtained a prebend or canonry 
by the King's appointment, and with it the office of Public Orator. 
He now, as Sub-Dean, " undertook the entire management of all 
affairs, and discharged it with great sufficiency and admirable 
diligence, leaving his beloved studies to interest himself not only in 
moderating at Divinity disputations, which was then an immediate 
part of his task, but in presiding at the more youthful exercises of 
sophistries, themes, and declamations." " This large society of 



1XX1V INTRODUCTION. 

scholars appeared his private family, he scarce leaving a single 
person without some mark or other of both his charity and care." 
These significant words come from a fellow-worker, who also did 
more than his share in keeping the Society together. When himself 
expelled in 1648, John Fell lived in a studious and retired manner, 
partly in the lodgings at Christchurch of the famous physician 
Willis, who was his brother-in-law, and partly in his own house 
opposite Merton College. What great services Fell did for Christ- 
church, for Oxford, and the Church, after the Restoration, needs 
no notice in this place, but we may form our estimate of his present 
work from those materials. 

Hammond's expulsion in 1648 must have been one of the greatest 
losses sustained by the Church in Oxford. Besides being eminent for 
his piety and learning, his almost unique personal advantages, his 
eloquence, industry, and high principle, we learn from Bishop Burnet 
that he was a "very moderate man in his temper, and was much set 
on reforming abuses." His " mild, persuasive voice " & might have 
availed, if any one's might, to have mitigated violence ; but he had 
long ago thrown in his lot with his royal master. He might have 
done something for the morals of the an ti- Parliamentarians, whom 
Philip Henry, a Student of Christchurch, described as the "better 
scholars of the House, but generally not the better men," b and some- 
thing more for the scholarship of the young " Puritans." Henry had 
himself owed much to Hammond, as well as to John Fell, during his 
early residence; and from his Life we may gather that the transition 
from one authority to the other did not seriously affect the studies 
of the place. Nor must we omit the names of Richard Allestree, 
the future Provost of Eton, and John Dolben, the future Archbishop 
of York, both eminently distinguished in the war on the King's 
side, and both now associated with Fell in their influence on the 

a Keble's Christian Year: Restoration. Charles the First thought Hammond 
" the most natural orator he had ever heard." 

b .?/<?, by Matthew Henry, 1699; Wordsworth's Ecclesiastical Biography, vol. vi. 
p. 142. 



INTRODUCTION. 

House, as well as, after their expulsion, in the maintenance of the 
Church services in Oxford. This is why the three friends are repre- 
sented together in the well-known picture in Christchurch Hall. It 
is no wonder that, with men of such spirit and such devotion, 
Christchureh was prevented from falling to pieces during the critical 
interval treated in the present chapter. 

Exeter College, during this period of suspense, and in the absence 
of Hakewill, a the Rector (a man of some mark, who had succeeded 
Prideaux, but had latterly been non-resident from illness), was kept 
together by the Sub-rector, Henry Tozer, a most resolute Royalist. b 
His case very early occupied the full attention of the Visitors, and 
their charges against him (p. 13) cannot be read without a smile. 
It is a great tribute to his services that Conant, so far from joining 
his accusers (as Wood asserted), "could never mention Tozer's name 
without respect." When, however, Conant took the helm as Eector, 
in 1649, he found " the wars had not only exhausted the College 
treasury but also much weakened the College discipline, and 
reduced the number of students miserably short of what it was 
before." c We have seen what steps he took to restore and reform 
his Society. Exeter had also, during the interval of suspense, the 
inestimable advantage of the close neighbourhood and effective 
countenance of its old Head, Bishop Prideaux, " who fled for 
sanctuary in or near that College which he had formerly governed 
as Rector with great applause." During this time he was doing 
what he could for the younger men, as we may gather from Nelson's 
notice of his conduct towards the famous George Bull, who entered 
the College on July 10, 1648. " Both these considerable persons 
[Prideaux and Conant] took more notice than ordinary of Mr. Bull ; 
they would frequently call upon him to mind his studies, and took 
all occasions to encourage him in the prosecution of them." d And 
yet one more man of mark must be added to the list of persons to 
whom Exeter was deeply indebted at this critical time. Baldwin 
Aciand, one of the College tutors, and a member of the old Devon- 

a See Boase's Reg. Exon. Preface, p. XXT!. b Ibid, passim. 

Life, pp. 9 and 11. d Life of Bull, Works, vol. YU. p. 11. 



Ixxvi INTRODUCTION. 

shire family who had been amongst its chief benefactors, was one of 
the main pillars of the House. He had distinguished himself as a 
Royalist Proctor in 1641, and never changed his principles; yet we 
find him remaining at his post till he felt himself obliged to decline 
the " Engagement," when he retired to the country with young 
George Bull, his beloved pupil. a 

Jesus College had been in a most flourishing condition under the 
excellent Dr. Mansell, a man " as remarkable for his sufferings as 
for his great learning, his primitive virtue and constancy." b Under 
his auspices and those of his successor, Sir Leoline Jenkins, the 
College assumed its present form, the original buildings and Foun- 
dation having been of a much more humble character. The intimate 
friend of Sheldon and Frewen, the two future Primates, he had 
retired with them to Wales during the war, and, as a member of a 
considerable Welsh family, powerfully, both then and afterwards, 
supported the cause of Church and King; but, as soon as the 
Visitation commenced, he returned to Oxford and defended his 
College to the last. Many men of note had been trained there under 
his auspices besides Jenkins, as, for example, Brevint, the " Jersey 
Fellow," afterwards known as Dean of Lincoln and a leading divine, 
and Lloyd, afterwards one of the " seven Bishops." Sir Leoline 
Jenkins tells us that the Visitors " openly bemoaned the difficulty 
of the times that forced them to turn out a person not onely in his 
life and conduct unblameable even to the highest rigor and par- 
tiality . . . but so highly usefule to the College he related to, that 
they seemed (in their confession) to take from it the onely stay and 
pillar that was likely, as the times then went, by his prudence, 
interest, and zeal, to preserve it from utter ruine and desolation." 
But like the Romans, who, when at their lowest fortunes, bought 
and sold the ground occupied by the enemy's camp, Mansell, " while 
the reformers were busy in turning out of him and his Society, was 
as active as if no such thing had been in settling the possessions 
and ascertayning the future revenewes of the College, with all the 

a See note to p. 130, and Bull's Works, as above. 
b Wynne's Life of Sir L. Jenkins, p. 2. 



INTRODUCTION. 

application possible nay, in ordering new accessions from himselfe 
and others to the succeeding intruders." a We shall come across this 
sterling Head of a House again during the progress of events. 

As to the mass of the Colleges, no particulars, during the two 
years' interval, sufficiently distinctive to require notice, have come 
to hand, or are suggested by the history of particular persons. 
When we have traced the Parliamentary Government of the Uni- 
versity to its conclusion we may be able to take a somewhat more 
complete survey of these institutions; but the materials for their 
separate history will still be found exceedingly scanty. 



CHAPTER IV. 

THE VISITORS AT WORK. 

16481658. 

We now enter on a period of ten years, from March 1647-8 to 
April 1658, of which, since the Visitation tells its own story in the 
Register here published, a short summary, in addition to the 
notes accompanying that document, will suffice. The remaining 
two years, which bring us up to the Restoration, will be dismissed 
in a very few words. 

Taking first of all a general glance at the Register, it will be 
observed that by far the larger part of it is occupied with the pro- 
ceedings of the four years of the Visitation, extending from March 
17th, 1647-8, to April 13th, 1652, which is the active period of that 
first Board of Visitors whose appointment, on May 1st, 1647, was 
described in the last chapter. This is a Presbyterian Board ; it is 
now practically headed by Reynolds as Vice-Chancellor and Dean 
of Christchurch, who must, however, as we have seen, be carefully 
distinguished from some of his coadjutors. They work for about 
two years after their fresh commencement in apparent harmony 
with the Committee of Parliament; but in the middle of the year 
a Jenkins's Life of Mcvnsell, as above, p. 14. 

CAMD. SOC. I 



INTRODUCTION. 

1650, probably through the influence of the Independent element 
in that Committee, serious differences show themselves ; and, 
Reynolds having already refused to take the " Engagement," and 
being gradually pushed aside, the quarrels between the two bodies 
become the leading feature of the Register till the close of the four 
years. Amongst this first set of Visitors there had been, as we see 
by the signatures, several changes before they came to an end. 

A second set of Visitors, including some of the first body, are 
temporarily appointed by Cromwell and the Parliament on June 
15th, 1652, with an especial view to the reformation of University 
and College Statutes; but no Orders from them appear till June 
20th, 1653. The Independents are strongly represented in this 
body; Owen, the Vice-Chancellor and new Dean of Christchurch, 
and Goodwin, President of Magdalen, being the two leaders ; but 
Conant, who had latterly been on the previous Board, had now 
sufficient influence, we may be sure, to carry much weight. This 
period is marked by a great increase of vigorous organization. 
The previous quarrels with the Committee of Parliament, and the 
dislike felt in the University itself, now in the hands of " Sub- 
mitters," to being kept so long in leading-strings, had retarded the 
"reformation." Orders had been given, but not obeyed; plans set 
on foot, but not pursued. The Colleges are now granted fresh 
liberties, but only in connection with stricter work and increased 
supervision; for the hand of the Visitors is still kept tight over 
them. Wood himself admits, amidst much scoffing, that the plans 
adopted by these Visitors, for making the previous changes effective, 
were successful. 

The personal influence of Oliver Cromwell is not difficult to 
trace at this time. He had been elected Chancellor in 1653, with 
only one dissentient voice. Owen and Palmer (of All Souls) were 
his personal friends, and the former was at first invested by him 
with almost supreme power. In the intervals which were suffered 
to elapse between the Commissions granted to fresh bodies of 
Visitors, which nevertheless included the best of the older members, 



INTRODUCTION. 

it is reasonable to believe that we are watching the policy of the 
Protector in accustoming the University to fall by degrees into its 
old method of self-government, without the intervention of a per- 
petual Governing Body. Just as his keen instinct interpreted the 
feeling of the nation to be in favour of bringing back the govern- 
ment into its old courses, and living once more under a King, a 
House of Lords, and a House of Commons, and just as he believed 
he might himself fill the one place and reconstitute the others, if he 
could only obtain the co-operation of those who had raised him to 
power, so he rightly divined that the old Universities must be re- 
stored, as soon as it was safe, to their ancient dignified position. 

The third set of Visitors, appointed in January 1653-4 by Parlia- 
ment, chiefly under Goodwin's influence with Cromwell, carry the 
same plans still further into active operation, and attempt to deal in 
the most trenchant manner with abuses which had cropped up 
again as soon as the "reformation" had been effected. On this 
Board several of the original set of Presbyterian Visitors reappear. 
They were no doubt introduced by Goodwin as a counterpoise to 
Owen, who, though an Independent, was of a different school from 
Goodwin, and had been superseded by him in Cromwell's favour. 
The last of these two Puritan potentates was of an unusual 
type, an Arminian Independent, nor was he the man to command 
the respect which Owen certainly succeeded in obtaining and keep- 
ing for some years. Hence the opposition between them, which 
may however have been useful to the public ; Conant, a Presby- 
terian, who sided with Goodwin against Owen on certain questions, 
becoming more and more the practical governor of the University. 
That government does in fact fall into his hands altogether when 
he becomes Vice-Chancellor in 1657, and so continues till the 
Restoration. Goodwin's importance declines in its turn with the 
death of the great Protector; and not long after that event Owen, 
under the influence of the "secluded" Presbyterian members of 
Parliament, now restored, is superseded as Dean of Christchurch by 
Reynolds, Conant's father-in-law. 



1XXX INTRODUCTION. 

We recur then, after this general view of the succession of Visi- 
tors, to the proceedings of the original Board, from the time when 
they commenced work in earnest, on March 17th, 1647-8. Their 
first business, after giving the legal notices, was to order the con- 
tumacious Heads of Houses and Prebends of Christchurch, whose 
expulsion had been confirmed by the London Committee, to vacate 
office ; their next to prepare for the advent of the Chancellor, whose 
letter announcing his intended visit is one of the earliest documents 
entered in the Register. A body of soldiers is sent to Oxford by 
command of Fairfax, who had received orders to that effect from 
Parliament, but this does not by any means overawe the University. 
Separate orders of dismissal are sent to Sheldon, Hammond, and 
others; and it is announced that their places had been filled by 
order of the Visitors; but this is treated with contempt. In her 
husband's absence, Mrs. Fell and her family hold the Deanery; and 
every College is in fact held as a fortress, each to give way only to 
force. One more attempt is made to succeed by fair means. A 
solemn Citation of all members of Convocation to meet the Visitors 
between the hours of two and three in the afternoon of April 7th is 
duly posted, but when the Visitors appeared none of those cited 
were there to meet them except old Paul Hood, Rector of Lincoln, 
and about ten Masters of Arts. There was certainly some excuse 
for the forcible proceedings which took place in a few days. 

On April llth, 1648, the Chancellor arrived. The poverty of the 
procession, the attendance of soldiers as a protecting force, the 
absence of University usages and accustomed dignity, the speech by 
Cheynell, the personal appearance of the detested Pembroke, the 
rough reception of the few persons who lent their countenance to the 
Visitation, and the motives on which these persons were, perhaps 
justly, supposed to act, all this afforded matter of infinite jest to 
the bitter writers of fly-sheets at that time, and is not only faith- 
fully reflected in the pages of Wood and Walker, but their language 
is actually adopted by these authors. Pembroke was not a man to 
give dignity to anything. He bears an indifferent character in 



INTRODUCTION. Ixxxi 

every sort of history; but his conduct on this occasion would need 
to have been exceptionally wise and moderate if it were to escape 
censure. As it was, he cannot fairly be accused of exceeding his 
actual duty; nor were the terms of the Surrender of 1646 in any 
sense overstrained. If Mrs. Fell would not make room for Reynolds, 
there was nothing for it but to have her carried out in a chair by 
soldiers, and set down in the great quadrangle. If Sheldon, who 
was so much superior to the Chancellor and Visitors in readiness 
and courtesy, would not turn out of All Souls till he was obliged to 
do so by a fresh and hurried Order, written by Prynne on the spot, 
the thing must be done. If none of the members of Magdalen 
would appear at the summons of the Visitors, they must be warned 
that they had forfeited their places till they had given satisfaction. If 
the names of the " intruders " were not to be entered in the buttery 
books of the Colleges by the proper authorities, the Visitors must 
do it themselves. 

The other business which fell to the Chancellor, besides the 
personal ejection of non-submitting Heads of Houses and Preben- 
daries of Christchurch, was to preside at a solemn Convocation, where 
Reynolds was installed Vice-Chancellor, and sundry Degrees con- 
ferred. Eeynolds made on this occasion a " polite and accurate 
oration." "Therein he spake very modestly of himself, and how 
difficult it was for a man that had sequestered himself from secular 
employments to be called to government, especially to sit at the 
stern in these rough and troublesome times, but since he had sub- 
jected himself to those that have authority to command him he 
did desire that good examples and counsel might prevail more in 
this reformation than severity and punishment." In accordance 
with the spirit of this speech Reynolds took care not to appear in 
the personal acts which have been related. Dr. Johnson a reflects 
with much asperity upon Cheynell for taking the opposite course. 
After a stay of three days the Chancellor departed, leaving the 
Visitors to complete what they were now very able to deal with 
a Lives of Eminent Men. bound up with Lives of the Poets. 



Ixxxii INTRODUCTION. 

by themselves. The result of their vigorous proceedings may be 
thus summarized. 

Out of the eighteen heads of Colleges two had lately died, Clay- 
ton of Pembroke and Pink of New College; and the election of 
the Fellows being overruled, Langley and Marshall were now placed 
in their respective vacancies. Six more submitted (though not all 
at once), or at least kept their places : Lawrence of Balliol ; Sir 
Nathaniel Brent of Merton; Hakewill of Exeter; Saunders of 
Oriel; Langbaine of Queen's; and Hood of Lincoln. It is remark- 
able that five out of six of these were the Heads of the most ancient 
Colleges. The ten following were ejected. Fell was superseded by 
Eeynolds ; Walker of University by Hoyle ; Sheldon of All Souls 
by Palmer; Oliver of Magdalen by John Wilkinson; Radcliffe 
of Brasenose, who was dying, by Greenwood ; Newlin of Corpus 
by Staunton; Potter of Trinity by Harris; Baylie of St. John's 
by Cheynell; Mansell of Jesus by Roberts; Pitt of Wadham by 
Wilkins. Of the Principals of the Halls three at least submited : viz. 
Zouch of Alban Hall, together with Rogers and John Wilkinson, 
of New Inn and Magdalen Halls respectively, both of whom were 
Visitors. Of the Professors and Readers three submitted: viz. 
Pocock, who had been lately appointed, by Selden's interest with 
the Visitors, Arabic Professor, Clayton, Professor of Anatomy (after- 
wards Warden of Merton), and Philips, Professor of Music; while 
Sanderson, Regius Professor of Divinity, was superseded by Robert 
Crosse and afterwards by Hoyle; Hammond, Public Orator, by 
Corbet, and afterwards by Button; Lawrence, as Margaret Professor 
of Divinity, by Cheynell ; Greaves, Professor of Astronomy, by 
Seth Ward; Turner, of Geometry, by Wallis; Birkenhead, of Moral 
Philosophy, by Henry Wilkinson junior ; Warin, of Ancient 
History, by Du Moulin ; Edwards, of Natural Philosophy, by Joshua 
Crosse; Wall, Prebendary (or Canon) of Christchurch, by Cornish 
(but he after a time submitted) ; Morley, Gardiner, Payne, and lies, 
his colleagues, were replaced by Langley, Rogers, Mills, and Henry 
Wilkinson senior. 



INTRODUCTION. Ixxxiii 

The remark which has often been made in reference to these 
substitutions has truth in it. The persons " intruded " by the 
Visitors were quite as good men as those ejected. It is true that 
Langbaine, Lawrence, Brent, Zouch, and Pocock a were the only 
men of much reputation among those who submitted; and that it 
was scarcely possible to match Sheldon, Sanderson, Hammond, or 
Morley, who held out; but Reynolds, Wilkins, and Seth Ward, 
who after the Restoration became Bishops, as well as Wallis and 
Robert Crosse, were all men of the highest reputation, and of whom 
their respective Colleges or Chairs might be proud; while the 
Wilkinsons, Cheynell, Harris, Button, and Hoyle, were men of no 
slight mark in their way. This could not be said of the large 
majority of those whom they superseded. 

The Visitors, after the departure of the Chancellor, at once com- 
mence their attack on the use of the Common Prayer-book in 
College chapels, but for some time without effect. It is a proof of 
the difficulty they experienced in substituting the Directory for 
the time-honoured Liturgy of the Church, that at Christchurch 
Latin Prayers were continued up to Christmas of this year, though 
by that time the expulsions had for the most part taken place, and 
the House been, long before, almost entirely " reformed." It was 
then that John Fell, Dolben, Allestree, and others, established the 
regular Church Services already described. 

a Of all the above cases perhaps there is none which throws more light on the 
struggle which must have gone on in the minds of learned and moderate Churchmen, 
who were also strong Royalists, than that of Pocock. His immense learning and 
high character procured him the most zealous friends in both parties. Preferred by 
Charles, patronized by Laud, protected by Selden, generously defended in his ad- 
versity by Dr. John Owen, his blameless character and honest resolution to do his 
duty carried him over all difficulties at last, even though he had to resign his 
Canonry for refusing the Engagement. He was still, however, allowed to retain his 
Hebrew and Arabic Lectureships, a large proportion of the new Heads of Houses 
and Professors joining in a petition to that effect presented to the Committee of 
Parliament; and at the Restoration he recovered his Canonry, which he held with 
the 'Professorship of Hebrew till his death in 1691. Few have left behind a more 
beautiful memory of a well-spent life. See Twells' Life of Pocock. 



INTRODUCTION. 

The Visitors having now surrounded themselves with a staff of 
new Masters of Arts, created chiefly from amongst the Bachelors of 
the Halls and from Cambridge, proceed to reorganize each College, 
especially those where a new Head had been placed. This was no 
easy matter, the bursars in many cases refusing to give up the 
accounts; but, on Henry Wilkinson and Cheynell being sent up to 
London on the subject, the London Committee encourage per- 
emptory proceedings, of which the Register bears ample evidence 
throughout this year and the next. 

It is necessary to observe here that just as the wholesale ejectment 
of contumacious members of Colleges does riot by any means appear 
to have been contemplated at first, but was gradually brought 
about by the desperate obstinacy of the resistance, so the organized 
resistance of the bursars and stewards suggests a sufficient reply to 
the constant attacks made by Wood, Walker, and others on the 
Visitors and their nominees for grasping at money. Probably there 
were cases of this sort, though most of them rest on bare assertion 
and inference; but the revenues of the Colleges were not intended 
to support a double staff of officers, and this was the difficulty. 
How were the new authorities to discover the various methods 
of evasion which the old practised hands, while they kept the 
books in their own possession, could so easily employ ? and in 
addition to the disorders as to rents, tithes, &c. produced by the 
late convulsions, we must remember that " the Second Civil War," 
as it is sometimes called, was raging in various parts of England 
during this very year. The danger of the King at Carisbrook 
drove the gallant Royalists of Wales and the southern counties into 
a chronic state of frantic insurrection. At the very moment of 
Pembroke's personal Visitation a tumult broke out in London; 
nor was the considerable gathering which came to a head at Col- 
chester put down till August. The Parliamentary fleet was divided; 
the Scotch under the Duke of Hamilton were joined by Langdale 
in an invasion of England which Cromwell repulsed. This dis- 
turbed state of things must be taken into account when we consider 



INTRODUCTION. IxXXV 

the measures passed at Oxford ; and Oxford was justly regarded as 
the great centre of loyalty to Church and King. A plot for the 
relief of Colchester was actually formed there, and discovered in 
July. How could the new governors succeed till the old ones 
submitted? Two instances will suffice: Even on May 27th the 
scholars of Corpus tore down from the College gates the order to 
depose Newlin, the President. As late as the beginning of July 
the Fellows of Brasenose, on the death of RadclifFe, their Prin- 
cipal, elected Yate to that office in the face of express orders from 
the Visitors to admit Greenwood, whom they had appointed. 

The Citation of members of Colleges began with Magdalen on 
May 2, 1648; and the examination of those who appeared was 
continued for several months. They were ordered to appear in 
batches, but not by whole Colleges at once, and required to answer 
the question, " Do you submit to the authority of Parliament in 
this present Visitation ? " It is impossible to read the hundreds of 
different replies given in the Register without a deep interest. 
Every shade of ingenuity is to be found expressed. Every sort of 
spirit is to be traced, from the jaunty, contemptuous, and some- 
times witty answer of the seasoned Cavalier, regarding the loss of 
his Fellowship or Scholarship, just as he would a bullet in battle, 
as the fortune of war, to the pitiful, almost agonised, wail of the 
man who is giving up all with infinite reluctance for conscience' 
sake, and thinks he may even yet soften the hearts of his judges. 
The Visitors soon find themselves bewildered in a labyrinth of 
evasive answers, and for a clue again apply to the sterner sagacity 
of the Committee of Parliament. Henry Wilkinson senior, no 
doubt sufficiently fretted at the scrupulousness of his colleagues, is 
again their ambassador. 

No time is lost in reply ; no weakness is to be discovered in the 
answer of the Committee. They classify the four most common 
methods of evasion, and pronounce them at once to be " no sub- 
mission." Neither " profession of ignorance " (the natural resource 
of many of the younger men and servants), nor "referring to the 

CAMD. SOC. m 



Ixxxvi INTRODUCTION. 

answer of their several Houses," nor " saying that they cannot, 
dare not, or do not, submit without giving a reason," nor " sub- 
mitting to the authority of the King and two Houses of Parlia- 
ment," &c. no one of these is to be reckoned a submission. 

This decision clears the ground. The names of those whose 
answers fall under the above four heads are reported to the London 
Committee, who decree their expulsion, and order the Visitors to 
see it executed. Accordingly, the notice is publicly given at each 
College by a guard of soldiers and beat of drum. But, as Wood 
tells us, even this definite proceeding by no means fully succeeded. 
Some had to be imprisoned for contempt, and some absconded for 
several weeks. 

An attempt is next made to draw the net still closer, and the 
Committee on August 1st order the Visitors to employ soldiers to 
remove the delinquents five miles from Oxford; to fill up all vacant 
places; to "bring absentees under sentence of contempt," and then 
expel them; and, finally, "to put in execution the power they 
have for removing scandalous persons from their places in the 
University." Several persons of importance, who still lingered on 
in spite of dismissal, are honoured with special orders from London 
to remove. Sanderson and Hammond, who had remained in their 
places when they found Crosse and Corbet, the persons appointed by 
the Visitors, unwilling to supersede them, now at last depart. 

These stringent measures produced their effect; but favour at 
head-quarters prevailed in certain cases, as notably in the case of 
Saunders, Provost of Oriel, whose refusal to submit (p. 118) is 
circumstantial and definite, yet, as Wood tells us, "he kept his 
place till the time of his death [several years later] by friends in the 
Committee;" and in that of Philip Henry at Christchurch (p. 72), 
whose godfather, the Earl of Pembroke, interceded for him. Some 
other cases of men whose answers are plainly enough outside the 
terms laid down, and who are yet found afterwards in their places, 
will be mentioned in Notes where they occur in the Register, and 
are suggestive as to still further cases not there mentioned. 



INTRODUCTION. 

In November of this year (1648) the Committee of Parliament, or 
" the London Committee " as it will hereafter be styled, take a 
further step by requiring the Visitors to "tender the l Negative Oath ' 
[by which all connection with the King, his Council, or his officers, 
was abjured] to all Masters, Scholars. Fellows, and officers of Col- 
leges," and to receive none as Submitters unless they had submitted 
before September 1st, or had " heretofore expressed some good affec- 
tion to the Parliament."" This led to further expulsions next year. 
The subsequent Order from London (November 1649) that the 
Visitors should insist on subscription to the " Engagement," did 
not, according to Wood, produce any appreciable effect, except in 
the distinguished cases of Reynolds, Pocock, and Mills, to which 
we may add that of Cheynell. Perhaps by that time most of those 
who had swallowed so much could take this one dose more ; but as 
it was left to the Heads of Colleges to obtain signatures, as it could 
sometimes be evaded by protests, and as we hear no more of it, it 
was probably pressed but slightly, or at least irregularly. George 
Bull, however, preferred to leave Exeter College, where he was 
making great progress, rather than take the Engagement; and the 
excellent Baldwin Acland, his tutor, retired into Somersetshire 
with him. Considering what sort of opinions were held by these 
persons, it is only remarkable that they could have remained in 
their College during the preceding years of Parliamentary govern- 
ment ; and this is an additional illustration both of the moderation 
of the victorious party and of the considerable amount of church- 
manship and royalism which continued to be mixed up with the 
mass. The cases of Bathurst, Langbaine, and Barlow, equally 
typica! 3 though they did not go off on the Engagement, but 
remained through all, may be added to the above. 

On the whole survey of this part of the Visitation it is evident that 
the measures of severity came from the London Committee, from the 
laymen in Parliament, and not from the clergy who did the work of 
the Visitation at Oxford. This should be set against Wood's remark 
that the lay Visitors declined to attend on account of the harsh- 
ness of their clerical brethren. These laymen may have felt the 



i INTRODUCTION. 

proceedings to be too much coloured with the theological element 
to be quite to their taste ; but they should have considered this 
before they accepted their office. The clerical Visitors were 
seriously hampered by being thus left alone. Their isolation was 
often objected to them, and the Statutes of some Colleges for- 
bade obedience to any Visitation made by resident members of 
the University. This was especially the case at New College. 3 A 
still more common form of refusal to submit was based on one 
of the earliest acts of the Long Parliament, in October 1641, 
when, in the first ardour of the national movement against the 
Laudian tyranny, "any person in Holy Orders was prohibited 
from executing any temporal authority by virtue of any Commis- 
sion." This Act had been pleaded by the University counsel before 
the Committee of Parliament in 1647. The Parliament, of course, 
argued that what they had done they could undo; but it placed the 
Presbyterian clergy in a false position. If they were only acting in 
obedience to the supreme authority, so also had said Laud and Wren. 
These objections to the clerical Visitors were so many reasons 
against the retirement of the laymen. When there were frequent 
" alarums in the City," shot fired at guards, and bonfires lighted in 
honour of Royalist festivals, it was dishonourable to leave matters 
in the hands of some half-dozen Presbyterian clergymen, even 
though assisted by the Lieutenant- Govern or of Oxford. 

But, whatever we may think of the conduct of these laymen, they 
were quite right in the belief which no doubt chiefly actuated them, 
that it was at bottom even more an ecclesiastical and theological 
than a political conflict. So, however, was the whole movement 
which we call " The Great Rebellion." The struggle at Oxford 
faithfully represented that of the nation. It was the meeting of 
the two great waves of theological opinion which the flood of the 
Reformation had kept together and concealed for the time. When 
the flood subsided with the lapse of years, which of the two was to 
predominate ? Was the united action of the two great parties to 
be secured by the moderate men of the anti- Laudian school, the 

a See Note, p. 53. 



INTRODUCTION. Ixxxix 

school of Hooker, Field, Ussher, Prideaux, and the two Reynoldses? 
Was it to be cemented on the basis of a limited and modified Epis- 
copacy? Or was the violent tension of the mighty struggle to be 
reproduced under the forms of peace, under a return to exactly the 
same system as before, the refusal of all concessions, the punishment 
of all who refused assent? The past violence of both parties in suc- 
cession prevented the adoption of the former course. The latter 
course prevailed. The schism was perpetuated at the Restoration, 
widened, strengthened, rendered irreparable for centuries. Must it 
last for ever? 

From the circumstances above-mentioned, as well as from the 
evident incompleteness of the Register, it is quite impossible to 
obtain an accurate enumeration of the persons expelled by the Vi- 
sitors; and we must be content with approximations. The College 
Registers unfortunately do not enable us to identify all their names, 
nor, on the other hand, all of those who were " intruded " by the 
Visitors. However, the tabular lists at the end of this book will 
afford us some better materials for the formation of a judgment than 
have as yet been available. Wood placed the number of persons 
who were interpreted to have refused to submit at 582 ; but even 
this, as we have seen, is not a number which can be accurately 
stated, or of much real value ; for many of them were allowed to 
remain, whilst others were certainly expelled whose refusals to sub- 
mit are not registered. Walker guessed the whole number of 
Fellows, Scholars, Chaplains, &c. actually expelled, to be about 400. 

There is another record in the Register from which we may 
obtain some guidance in this matter the list of persons ap- 
pointed by the Visitors to Fellowships, Scholarships, Chaplaincies, 
and places as Choristers or College Servants. The numbers on the 
list amount to 497, and it extends over a period of eight years; but 
the careless and irregular style of the entries goes far to deprive it of 
any absolute authority. Between April 1648, when the citations 
begin, and the end of the year, by which time the answers have 
for the most part been registered, and the expulsions decreed, there 
are 296 appointments noted. Between January 1st, 1648-9, and 



XC INTRODUCTION. 

January 1st, 1649-50, 114 appointments are noted, leaving 87 for 
the remaining years. Again, the difficulty here is to define what 
appointments are substitutions for expelled persons, and what are 
merely made for the purpose of filling up vacancies which had 
occurred in the natural course of things, or which, having so oc- 
curred, had been filled up by a College contrary to express order 
from the Visitors. Nor can any ordinary average assist us, such as 
Walker has vainly attempted to make ; for all sorts of irregularities 
had taken place; and in many cases vacancies could not be filled 
up because the revenues were in too great disorder to admit of it. 

As has been said, we can only make some general approximation. 
We may, perhaps, roughly assign a very large majority of the 296 
appointments in the first year to substitutions for persons sum- 
marily expelled, and of the 1 14 in the second year to substitutions 
for men whose submission was ruled to be too late, for men who 
had declined the Negative Oath and Engagement of 1649, for men 
whose places had been declared vacant in consequence of absence 
without leave since the Surrender, for men whose expulsion had 
been delayed in the hope of their submission, and finally for those 
who had been ruled to be " ill affected or scandalous persons." The 
large majority of the 87 appointments made in the third and follow- 
ing years may be assigned to vacancies caused in the ordinary way. 

On the whole we shall probably be very near the mark in accept- 
ing Walker's estimate of 400 actual expulsions, exclusive of ser- 
vants; and it may be doubted whether we shall ever obtain any 
more accurate statistics on the subject. The reader will hardly con- 
sider it a matter of supreme importance. 

It may be more to the purpose to conclude this notice of the ex- 
pulsions by two opinions expressed at the time by considerable 
persons. Dr. John Fell, embittered by his own and his father's 
sufferings, writes thus in his Life of Dr. Allestree: 

Within the compass of a few weeks an almost general riddance was made of the 
loyal University of Oxford, in whose room sncceeded an illiterate rabble, swept up 
from the plough-tail, from shops and grammar-schools, and the dregs of the neigh- 
bour University; though in that scandalous number some few there were who, 
notwithstanding they had parts and learning, were preferred upon the account of 



INTRODUCTION. XC1 

their relations, who merited a better title to the places they possessed, and have since 
proved useful men in the Church and State. Those of the ancient stock who were 
spared upon this trial were afterwards cast off upon the second test of the Engage- 
ment, till in the end there were left very few legitimate members in any of the 
Colleges. 

This is, on the face of it, a very one-sided and exaggerated state- 
ment. The Visitors who showed such care in filling up the im- 
portant offices were not likely to act in the reckless manner charged 
on them by Fell, Wood, and Walker; nor were they reduced to 
such straits. Here is the deliberate opinion of a contemporary, 
who sums up the whole question in a more moderate and philo- 
sophical manner. Philip Henry, a Eoyalist, did not, as we have 
seen, submit, but kept his place by favour as Student of Christchurch. 
His son, Matthew Henry, the famous Commentator, whom we may 
thoroughly trust, reports that his father 

thought, long after, that milder methods might have done better, and would have 
been a firmer establishment of the new interest ; but considering that many of 
those who were put out being in expectation of a sudden change which came not 
of many years after w ere exasperating in their carriage towards the Visitors ; and 
that the Parliament, who at this time rode masters, had many of their own friends 
ready for University preferment, which, Oxford having been from the beginning 
a garrison for the King, they had long been kept out of, and those they were con- 
cerned to oblige, it was not strange if they took such strict methods. And yet 
nothing being required but a bare submission, which might be interpreted but as 
crying " quarter," he thought withal that it could not be said the terms were hard, 
especially if compared with those of another nature imposed since.* 

This, of course, refers to the terms enforced on St. Bartholomew's 
Day. Henry's opinion as to the comparative merits of the ejected 
and intruded scholars has been already given; and other evidence 
of a very different character from Fell's will be observed in dif- 
ferent parts of the Register and in this Introduction. 

We may no w address ourselves to the still larger questions raised 
by the general Orders contained in the Register. For the most part 
the Orders of both the London Committee and the Visitors tell 
their own tale, and require little notice beyond what can be best 

a Life, Sec. as above. 



XC11 INTRODUCTION. 

conveyed in Notes. On the general questions of discipline, reli- 
gious exercises, and education, there seem to have been no differ- 
ences whatever between the two bodies. The quarrel begins upon 
the interference of the London Committee with Colleges and indi- 
viduals in cases which the Visitors very naturally claim as their 
own province; when the Committee, in fact, forget that they had 
by their own act deliberately placed themselves in the position of a 
mere Court of Appeal from a body residing on the spot, to which 
they had given the fullest powers. a It will be seen that the Visitors, 
though their armour is by no means proof, do, on the whole, make 
out their own case with considerable force, but are fain to discover 
compromises by which the stronger body may be propitiated. 

There is an interesting point on which both of the ruling Powers 
seem to have cordially agreed, and which deserves special notice. 
Some person or persons, whose names do not appear, had, in 1649, 
proposed to the London Committee a " Model," or, as we should now 
say, a scheme, of reform, which was communicated to the Visitors, 
and a letter of inquiry about it from the Committee is in the Re- 
gister (p. 261). It should be premised that neither of these bodies 
had practically interfered to any great extent as yet with the Statutes 
and Benefactions of Colleges. They certainly began with the in- 
tention of working their own reforms into the existing framework. 
The exceptions, besides those implied in the expulsion and substi- 
tution of individuals, had been in the case of Sir William Paddy's 
benefaction at St. John's, and in filling up at Corpus and elsewhere, 
without reference to birth, certain close Fellowships and Scholar- 
ships for which proper candidates could not be obtained an idea 
familiar enough to modern times. On March 8th, 1649-50, the 
Visitors had issued an Order which foreshadowed more general 
changes (p. 223). On August 8th, dissatisfied with the slow pro- 
gress they were making, they go much further. After enjoining 
the strict observance of the " auncient Statutes " of Colleges, except 
" in such special cases where the law of God or of man doth require 

a See Note to p. 317. 



INTRODUCTION. XC111 

the contrary" not much of a compliment to " pious founders," 
they order that all such cases should be referred to them " until the 
Statutes of every House can be received, reformed, and settled" (p. 
259). On September 18th, they promulgate the "Model" above- 
mentioned, from which we may make the following extracts for our 
present purpose: 

That because Statutes as well as persons are a grand subject of reformation, the 
Fellows of all Colleges who came in by a Parliamentary power be appointed to con- 
sult with their Head for removing such Statutes and Constitutions as are either 
impious, superstitious, or inconvenient, and substitute such as may promote piety 
and good learning. 

Then follows: 

And it is likewise enacted that no man enjoy his Fellowship beyond Doctor's 
standing, or one year after his Commencement, unless they be such as are Professors, 
or Public Lecturers, and may do more eminent service in the University than 
elsewhere (p. 264). 

Another portion of this " Model," referring to the appointment 
of Keynolds, Carill, b and Goodwin as General Lecturers or Preachers 
for the University, in accordance with " the Lord-General's motion 
to the Parliament," indicates the quarter from whence the " Model" 
proceeded. Fairfax and Cromwell had lately visited Oxford, and we 
may well believe that this document was drawn up by persons who 
embodied the result of their observations. The proposals as a whole 
may be thought what would have commended themselves to men of 
a practical turn of mind, unfettered by strictly academical ideas. 

Wood believes that this movement in favour of Terminable 
Fellowships had no effect, at any rate, "for the present"; and 

a The word "Commencement" has long been superseded at Oxford by its 
synonym " Inception," and that word itself requires explanation in the present day. 
It was the actual grant of the capacity of teaching, which took place at the first 
" Act " following upon the conferring of the Degree, or rather what is commonly 
supposed to be the conferring of the Degree, but which, strictly speaking, is only a 
licence for subsequent Inception. Hence the importance of the "Act " in past times, 
little recognized in the associations connected with the modern Encaenia or Com- 
memoration. 

b Or Caryl, the celebrated Independent minister. He attended Cromwell on his 
expedition to Scotland in 1650, along with Owen. 
CAMD. SOC. H 



XC1V INTRODUCTION. 

certainly we hear no more of it. The Visitation was not strong 
enough to carry such an innovation, once indeed attempted on a 
small scale in the reign of Edward the Sixth, a but never heard of 
again to any purpose till it formed the main object of the appoint- 
ment of the present Royal Commissions now sitting for the reform 
of both Universities. 

The alterations of Statutes contemplated in the " Model" were on 
the contrary, as Wood tells us, though he gives no details, " for the 
most part put in execution ;" but neither does the Register contain 
any further hint on the subject, nor does any trace of such a pro- 
ceeding seem to have been left in the Colleges. We cannot gather 
much from such negative proof. Of course all such marks would 
have been obliterated at the Restoration. It would have been 
thought highly undesirable to leave on record any notice of a 
" Model" containing such an inconveniently-suggestive clause as 
that on Terminable Fellowships. 

The need and propriety of altering the Statutes must of course be 
judged from the stand-point of the Visitation ; but it is interesting 
to notice that the Visitors, in handing over the task to the Head 
and Fellows of each College under their own supervision, very 
nearly forestalled the method adopted in 1878 at Oxford and Cam- 
bridge by a Conservative Parliament. And precisely as the present 
Royal Commission has required the Hebdomadal Council and Con- 
vocation to report on the changes required by the University, so the 
University, in June 1651, acting in concert with the Visitors, 
appointed Delegates to review and report upon its own Statutes 
(Reg. Conv. T.) 

These evidences of the visit of the " Lord-General " and the 
" Lieu tenant- General " to Oxford suggest a word upon that event. 
It was highly characteristic. We are told that their object was " to 
see what reformation or alteration had been made " in the Univer- 
sity. It was in fact a quasi-royal visit. Instead of the great annual 

W. of All SauU, p. 72. 



INTRODUCTION. XCV 

ceremony of the " Public Act," which was " put off upon consider- 
ation that great meetings and extraordinary expenses in these times 
were not convenient," a wise precaution after the King's recent 
" execution," the two virtual Sovereigns, the first of whom was so 
soon to succumb to the second, resolved to make a stately visit to 
Oxford. Fairfax had not been there since the place surrendered to 
him. Cromwell had been concerned with the Earl of Manchester 
in the reduction of Cambridge to obedience after a more than 
military fashion. Would they be satisfied with what had been 
done ? Was it their intention that the University of Oxford should 
be at liberty to proceed on its way if it were once purged of dis- 
affection to the new Government ? All sorts of levelling theories 
were afloat. The King was dead. The University awaited the 
arrival of the Generals with no little trepidation. 

The two great men on whom so much depended made their 
entry with all state on May 17th, 1649. They were lodged at All 
Souls, and entertained there by Jerome Zanchy, the new Fellow, 
Subwarden, and Proctor, who was also a Colonel in the Parlia- 
mentary forces, and, like Palmer, the Warden of All Souls, now 
absent on his duties in the House of Commons, a friend of Cromwell's." 
On May 18th the Generals received the University authorities, 
and Cromwell made an oration. He told them that the General 
and himself knew no Commonwealth could flourish without learning, 
and that they, whatsoever the world said to the contrary, meant 
to encourage it, and were so far from subtracting any of their 
means that they proposed to add more. On May 19th they dined 
at Magdalen, played bowls on the College green, and then pro- 
ceeded to Convocation, where they received the degree of D.C.L., 
Zanchy presenting them as Proctor. Then seated in their scarlet 
gowns, Fairfax on the right and Cromwell on the left of the 
Vice-Chancellor, sundry officers, Sir Hardress Waller, Harrison, 
Ingoldsby, and others, were brought up by Zanchy, and received 

* See Note on Zanchy, p. 277. 



XCV1 INTRODUCTION. 

the degree of M.A.; Button, the Public Orator, concluded with an 
oration, and the day was wound up with a " sumptuous banquet 
at the Public Library." On Sunday, May 20th, Henry Willkin- 
son, senior, and Maudit, the Senior Proctor, preached before them 
at St. Mary's, and the next day they took a solemn farewell of 
the chief members of the University. Thus soon after the setting 
of the sun of Royalty had Mars appeared above the horizon. It 
will be observed that Cromwell, the inferior officer, is the speaker, 
not Fairfax. His subsequent conduct proved that he meant what 
he now said. The Barebones Parliament clamoured loudly for a 
reduction of all establishments, the Universities included; Milton 
and his friends never let an opportunity slip of pressing their point. 
Cromwell turned a deaf ear to them all. a Perhaps we should also 
attribute something to the impulse given by Fairfax, though he 
soon lost all influence. That great man was a lover of learning, an 
antiquarian, and book-collector. He evinced those characteristics 
in many ways, but especially by his exertions to save and augment 
the Bodleian Library, which had suffered during the war. b 

We may notice a second point on which the London Committee 
and the Visitors were in entire accord, the compulsory use of Latin 
in familiar discourse by members of Colleges when within their own 
walls. It was ordered that no other language whatever was to be 
spoken; and the reason given is that " a complaint is made by divers 
learned men of the defect that English scholars labour under, both in 
their private and home exercises and in their public discourses with 
foreigners, by their speaking English in their several Colleges and 
Halls." The Order was so constantly repeated that it suggests a 
persistent and insuperable opposition. The reformers were here 
acting on the basis of old and well-known rules. Most Colleges 
contained a statutable provision to this effect, but there was gene- 
rally a saving clause, which no doubt was found convenient. At 
Queen's, New College, All Souls, and Magdalen, it ran thus: " nisi 

See Note, p. 377. b Macray's Annals of the Bodleian. 



INTRODUCTION, XCVli 

ad aliud idioma extraneorum vel laicomm prcesentia seu ex alia 
causa rationabili urgeantnr" 

It is not easy to discover when the practice had become obsolete ; 
but it was not yet so in 1590, if we may take the word of Dr. Bond, 
Vice- Chancellor and President of Magdalen: " I know myne owne 
House," says he, " and divers other Colleges whose schollars dare 
not presume to speake any other language then Latine." This reply 
was given to Bancroft by way of answer to reprimands from two 
successive Chancellors, Leicester and Hatton, who had complained 
(perhaps at the demand of the Queen) of the disuse of Latin. At 
the same time Dr. Bond claims to have entirely restored the use of 
Latin in Convocation and Congregation. " whereby," as he says 
with a touch of humour, " hath ensued great quietness in our public 
assemblies." But in 1609, Bancroft, now Chancellor, insists with 
vehemence on the neglect of speaking in Latin (Annals); and, in 
1622, Abbot, in a letter to All Souls College, finds fault with the 
general deterioration of Latin style in Oxford. " The style of your 
letter is somewhat abrupt and harsh, and doth rather express an 
affected brevity than the old Ciceronian oratory. And I am sorry 
to hear that this new way of writing is not only become the fault 
of the College, but of the University itself." a If the practice had 
not altogether dropped out before the Great Rebellion it was cer- 
tainly not likely to survive such a revolution. Wood says that 
" by virtue of this Order every member did then speak Latin, in 
times of refection especially; but the order being soon after neglected 
was re-enforced by another " (Annals, 1649). He might have said 
by another after that, which was in all probability equally neglected. 
The habit of speaking in Latin was, however, kept up to some 
extent by its retention as the only language in which Convocation 
could be addressed, and it was not till the last reform of the Uni- 
versity constitution by the Royal Commission of 16 and 17 Viet, 
and the formation of a " Congregation" of residents, which was to 

a Archives of All Souli. 



XCV111 INTRODUCTION. 

be addressed in English, that the custom altogether decayed. Con- 
vocation itself is now addressed in English, when " Decrees," the 
more usual form of reference to that body, are discussed; and, since 
custom renders it no longer necessary even to frame a sentence in 
Latin asking leave to be excused from speaking it, the last vestige 
of colloquial Latin has been swept away. Statutes indeed can still 
only be discussed in Latin at their final stage in Convocation; but, 
as they have already been fully discussed during their progress 
through Congregation, no one takes advantage of this privilege, the 
occasion being now by common consent merely used for voting 
"Placet" or "Non-placet." It is still, however, open to any 
learned and adventurous resident or non-resident Member of Con- 
vocation to revive the ancient method on these occasions, if he 
imagines that he is likely to influence votes by the use of the per- 
suasive but disused language of Cicero. 

The other point in which we can trace unity of action between 
the London Committee and the Visitors indeed, with all three 
Boards of Visitors in succession viz., the determination to have 
the religious education of the Undergraduates cared for in every 
College and in every University lecture, after the fashion of the 
Nonconformists, has been already noticed in a previous chapter. 
The second set of Visitors, under Owen's influence, bring the 
matter forward in the most thorough and practical form, but only 
on the same lines as their predecessors. The third set of Visitors 
supplement what had been done by the others. In connection with 
this characteristic enforcement of religion went hand in hand an 
equally careful watchfulness over the morals of the University. The 
Visitors deal stringently with such abuses as resort to taverns, 
Sunday sports, degradation of the annual "Act," corrupt elections, 
carelessness in the matter of tutorial discipline. The Heads of 
Houses are forced to reside and do special duties, Tutors to look after 
their men, Professors to lecture; Degrees are to be conferred only 
after proper exercises and certificates; Boards of Examiners are 
appointed for Fellowships and Scholarships : the very servants are 



INTRODUCTION. XC1X 

to be looked after quite as much as their masters. College after 
College is set to rights, not always with eventual success; but the 
attempts are well meant, and generally judicious. 

There is no doubt an air of what we should now call over-legis- 
lation and " fussiness" about this class of Orders when we contem- 
plate them as a whole; but a candid critic will observe how much 
was due to the difficulties of the Visitors, to the collapse of so many 
Colleges from debt, to the anomalous relations between the old and 
new members of Colleges, and to the inexperience or unfitness of 
newly-appointed Heads of Houses. There must also have been a 
constant tendency in many Colleges towards a return to the Church 
services and ecclesiastical order, which the Visitors could not ex 
hypothesi openly permit, and reiteration of Orders became necessary 
under the circumstances. There was also the perpetual cropping:- 
up of old abuses, such as the sale of Fellowships, in the very attempt 
to exterminate which at one particular College, where it was most 
inveterate, the Visitors suddenly came to an end. In that respect 
their end was an euthanasia. They could hardly have been more 
honourably engaged at their supreme moment. 

Of course the difficulty in such a Visitation, differing from ordi- 
nary Visitations in its necessary continuance for a considerable time, 
was to know when their "reductions to a fit state to make elec- 
tions," their " godly reformations," their suppression of abuses, 
were sufficiently secured to admit of a return to self-government. 
As it was impossible to weed out all opposing elements, the goal 
never seemed to be quite attained. Opposition, hushed for a time, 
was sure to break out again. The moderate party, in whose hands, 
when the more violent reformers had done their work and lost their 
influence, the decision rested, did not take the same view of this 
subject as the Standing Committee of Parliament sitting in London; 
and it is highly probable that what looked like weakness and vacil- 
lation on their part, calling for reprehension and vigilance from 
London, was only the conviction entertained by those in contact with 
the actual persons concerned that the time for conciliation and liberty 



C INTRODUCTION. 

had arrived. The University, as soon as it was "reformed," was 
continually putting a pressure upon them which the London Com- 
mittee did not so keenly feel. For example, as early as March 16th, 
1649-50, the Convocation of the University presented a petition for 
a general return to free elections in Colleges ; a while the Visitors 
and the London Committee were resolutely bent on permitting the 
privilege in certain cases only, according to their judgment of fitness. 

But, besides this, the intestine quarrels between Presbyterians and 
Independents, which had already affected the Visitation in its 
incipient stage, developed rapidly after the King's " execution," 
and were not only signalized by the enforcement of the " Engage- 
ment" and the displacement of Keynolds, but distinctly manifested 
in the quarrels of the two bodies in London and Oxford. The 
Register affords such ample evidence of these quarrels that they 
need not be noticed any further in this place. But it may be 
remarked that the Register of Convocation throws additional light 
upon them as early as September 18th, 1649, when there appears a 
letter of the Visitors begging the Committee to pay no attention to 
the complaints of their proceedings which are made to them by 
young men ; thus betraying the difficulty under which they already 
labour. 

But, whatever else was going on, the independence of the Univer- 
sity, even under the first set of Visitors, was gradually recovering 
itself in spite of all checks. The quarrels between the governors 
gave breathing-time to the governed. Some Colleges at any rate 
received an early permission to make their own elections. Sir 
Nathaniel Brent, pursued by Nemesis, passes out of sight complain- 
ing of his colleagues for not giving more liberty to his own Merton. 
It is even thought safe in 1651 to revive the annual " Act," though 
under the protection of a guard of soldiers. When Owen comes to 
the front in a position almost despotic, in 1652, the liberty of 
College elections receives a great impulse by the establishment of a 

Reg. Conv. T. 



INTRODUCTION. Cl 

Board to examine all candidates, and the permission granted to 
Colleges to elect among them. At the same time Owen and his 
colleagues leave no loop-hole for evasion of the Orders laid down for 
the government of Colleges ; and under him the University made, 
it would seem, a considerable growth in order and efficiency. 

Again, the differences between Owen and Goodwin do in reality 
further the independence of the University. The former takes part 
with the corporate body against one for whom he could hardly but feel 
some contempt; and the demand for a return to Local Visitors, and 
for limitation of the power exercised by virtue of the Parliamentary 
Commission, finds support from the very man who, a little earlier, 
would have been extremely disinclined to grant it. The modera- 
tion and good sense of the form in which the demand was made 
exhibited the best proof that the time was ripe for it. When the 
University (in 1657) plaintively suggested that nine years were 
enough to " purge and correct all humours and malignities;" for, 
said they, " of above five hundred Fellowes which there were at 
the end of the war there be not many now remaining ;" when they 
alleged the very patent abuse that the Heads of Houses were so 
often both parties and judges in their own cause, and that "Visitors 
residing upon the place do rather nourish and foment than appease 
differences " ; and when they begged the appointment of certain lead- 
ing men of the Commonwealth as Visitors of the respective Colleges, 
by way of a return to the ancient system of employing in that office 
" great persons, in single capacities," it was evident that, where so 
much could be said, a very little would be enough to bring the 
government by a body of Visitors to an end. The storms gathering 
on the political horizon in 1658 were quite sufficient for this purpose. 
Oxford itself had some experience of them in that year (Annals). 

The growing strength of University independence was finally 
proved by its victory over Owen himself, who, in his disgust at 
being unable to force his reforms on Convocation, attempted to 
carry them with a high hand, but found it best to desist : the 
Presbyterians were regaining power, and the Independents losing 

CAMD. soc. o 



Cll INTRODUCTION. 

it. We hear little more of him at Oxford. Neither he nor the 
Visitors were any longer necessary, and the man had been formed, 
under so many varied experiences, who was exactly in his place as 
a substitute for Parliamentary Visitors.* For three years from the 
commencement of his Vice-Chancellorship, in 1657, Dr. Conant 
exercised the most beneficial influence, and passed on his charge 
unharmed till the Kestoration once more set it on the old track 
from which the storms of twenty years had diverted it. 

Besides the incessant vigilance which, as we have seen, Dr. 
Conant exercised in the actual management of affairs, he evinced 
his right to represent his beloved University by his conduct on two 
special occasions. The University, or a very large proportion of 
its members, was, in 1658, by no means as yet prepared to accept 
the idea of an absolute return to the system of obedience to the 
Visitors of Colleges specified in the old Statutes, most of whom were 
great ecclesiastics. They had gained their object; they were free 
from the dictation of a Board of Parliamentary Visitors ; but they 
petitioned Richard Cromwell and his Parliament " that they would 
please to name local Visitors to those Societies whose Statutes had 
lodged the Visitatorial power in Archbishops and Bishops." Conant, 
already looking forward to a revival of the old Statutes in their 
entirety, stoutly resisted the most pressing importunities to concur 
in this Petition, chiefly on the ground of the private rights of Col- 
leges which the University had no claim to override. Nor would 
he consent to any collusion in the matter, though freely suggested 

8 Owen's parting address to the University contained the following record of 
honest work: " Prof essors' salaries, lost for many years, have been recovered and 
paid; some offices of respectability have been maintained ; the rights and privileges 
of the University have been defended against all the efforts of its enemies; the 
treasury is tenfold increased new exercises have been introduced and estab- 
lished, old ones have been duly performed; reformation of manners has been 
diligently studied in spite of the grumbling of certain brawlers ... I congratulate 
yon on a successor who is able completely to repair any injury which your affairs 
may have suffered through our inattention." It should be mentioned that Owen sat 
for a short time in Parliament as Burgess for the University. 



INTRODUCTION. Clll 

to him. His firmness, sorely tested on this point, was rewarded by 
the final collapse of the Petition, and the University was saved in 
spite of itself. The change would indeed have soon been overruled, 
but a bad precedent was avoided. 

The other occasion was his resistance to the movement, in which 
Cromwell had been deeply interested, for establishing a University 
at Durham ; there had previously been a similar movement in 
favour of York. The arguments against allowing a rival to Oxford 
and Cambridge may be found well put in the Register of Convoca- 
tion, and also by Wood; but we learn from Cocant's Life how 
largely the Vice-Chancellor was personally concerned in the affair. 
Whatever may be thought of the policy of adding to the number 
of English Universities in the present day, there can be little doubt 
that the "multiplication of small and petty academies 5 ' to use 
the phrase of Conant's biographer would have been at that time, 
and for long afterwards, a serious evil. The old Universities have 
often exhibited great defects, but they have pretty accurately re- 
flected those of the nation at large, and have at least secured a 
national confidence such as will be looked for in vain in other 
countries. It may be doubted whether this would have been the 
case had additional Universities been created in the seventeenth or 
eighteenth centuries. It was by Conant's unwearied efforts that 
" the grant was stifled, and both Universities suffered to continue in 
the quiet possession of their ancient rights and privileges." 

That his biographer* should claim for Conant a title to our 
highest respect for his defence of the time-honoured academical 
costume, in opposition to Owen, who had shown his contempt for 
it, may not appear a matter of much importance ; but, if it be 
granted that it was a desirable object to restore and preserve the 
great traditional landmarks of the University, there can be no 
doubt that the strict retention of the old dress was not a small 
matter. Some other instances of the Vice-Chancellor's fitness for 
his post at this time might be gathered from his Life, but enough 

Life, p. 27. 



CIV INTRODUCTION. 

has been said to show that he well justified the " expectations of 
something extraordinary from his government/' shown upon his 
receiving the insignia laid down by Owen in 1657, when " there 
was such a universal shout of a very full Convocation as has hardly 
ever been known on a like occasion." Perhaps, however, we might 
suspect that the shout was a little swelled by exultation at the con- 
clusion of Owen's government, by that time sufficiently unpopular. 
Under this view of the condition of the University during the 
later period of the Commonwealth, and bearing in mind the general 
anarchy into which the whole country was plunged soon after the 
great Protector's death, it is of little consequence that we can assign 
no exact reason for the abrupt termination of the Eegister. Wood 
does not attempt to account for it. It is evident that the Visitation, 
if not formally dissolved, practically collapsed and disappeared. 
There was no fixed Government in London to keep it on foot, 
and the general feeling of the country was in favour of a recur- 
rence to the old institutions and the old ways of working them. 
The University was in good order; it satisfied the country; it was 
well represented by its chief officer, and by Reynolds, who, early in 
1659, became again Dean of Christchurch ; its secretly and quietly 
growing tendency towards the restoration of the Sovereign was 
in accordance with the political feelings of the people; and the 
alarms to which it was exposed during the brief period of transition 
sufficiently schooled it into sympathy with the proceedings taken 
outside its precincts. What happened when the day came at last 
may well be told in the words of Conant's biographer : 

On the 29th May, 1660, was the happy Restoration of King Charles the Second. 
The whole body of the nation was then at strife who should soonest, with all duty 
and respect, throw himself at his Majesty's feet; and the University of Oxford waited 
on him with their hnmble Address to recognise his sovereign power and right, and 
congratulate his happy return from exile, by a volume of poetry (as is usual on 
extraordinary occasions) under the title of Britannia Rediviva. These were pre- 
sented in June by Dr. Conant, the Vice-Chancellor, at London, attended by the 
Proctors and a select number of Doctors and Masters, by Decree of Convocation. 
His Latin speech to His Majesty on this occasion was much commended by good 
judges, but is lost. 



INTRODUCTION. CV 

Not so the copy of verses composed and presented by the Vice- 
Chancellor himself at the same time; but it is unnecessary to quote 
them, as our present business is simply to bring the history of the 
Commonwealth, as it affected Oxford, to a close. 

After a struggle of twenty years, which may be said to have 
centred round Oxford, the old order of Church and State was once 
more established. Oxford had been in every sense the stronghold 
of Charles the First and his advisers, the basis from which his 
aggressive ecclesiastical system had been worked, the intellectual 
representative of his policy, the visible specimen of the grandeur 
and beauty which were the glory of English Church and State. It 
was against Oxford that the not unprovoked anathemas of the 
violent Puritans had been most continuously directed. It was upon 
Oxford that the more patient reforming efforts of the Long Parlia- 
ment had been most systematically tried. It was the restoration of 
Oxford which exercised the affection, the reverence, and the self- 
sacrifice of the men whose thoughts and hopes had never been 
absent from it during the period of their exclusion. But we must 
not allow the outraged feelings of these men, and the tone which 
they so successfully infused into the history of the times, their 
solemn reassertions of Divine. Eight, and their cruel treatment the 
product more of fear and suspicion than revenge of Dissenters, to 
blind us to the true history of the Visitation of Oxford. 

"We may indeed sum up the preceding chapters by the remark, that 
if we candidly survey the sketch which has just been presented, if 
we acknowledge the steady consistency with which the chief reforms, 
necessary after the tumults of Civil War, had been effected, the good 
sense and public spirit evinced by most of the leading persons con- 
cerned, and the wisdom of the gradual process by which the vene- 
rable forms and customs of the ancient University were allowed to 
reassert their predominance, if, further, we can bring ourselves to 
make allowance for the defects of a religious system which the 
faults of the Church had exercised a great influence in producing, 
and for the fanaticism which was only gradually separated from 



CV1 INTRODUCTION. 

that system, as well as for the phraseology which perhaps still more 
affronts our taste, we shall gain some insight into the paradox 
presented by the following well-known passage from Lord Claren- 
don's great Work, and be less troubled to find a solution than the 
noble historian himself. After expressing his unbounded astonish- 
ment that " this wild and barbarous depopulation," this reign of 
" stupidity, negligence, malice, and perverseness," had not " extir- 
pated all the learn'ng, religion, and loyalty which had so eminently 
flourished there," he goes on to say that the University at this 
period " yielded a harvest of extraordinary good and sound know- 
ledge in all parts of learning; and many who were wickedly in- 
troduced applied themselves to the study of good learning and the 
practice of virtue, and had inclination to that duty and obedience 
they had never been taught; so that, when it pleased God to bring 
King Charles the Second back to his throne, he found that Uni- 
versity abounding in excellent learning, and devoted to duty and 
obedience little inferior to what it was before its desolation."* 

This miraculous result he attributes to the "goodness and richness 
of that soil" which "choked the weeds, and would not suffer the 
poisonous seeds, which were sown with industry enough, to spring 
up;" an explanation which is, to say the least, insufficient. The 
number of great men bred at Oxford during this time, and who 
formed the glory of the succeeding period, has been often quoted in 
support of Clarendon's candid admission; and of course the testi- 
mony of many writers friendly to the Parliamentarian side might 
easily be added; but it may be enough to quote here the impartial 
words of the well-known antiquary, Dr. Bloxam, the author of 
the Magdalen College Register, breathing, as his narrative does in 
every line, the spirit of the enthusiastic churchman and royalist. 
He appends to the remarks of the fanatical Heylin the following 
sentence : " Notwithstanding Heyliu's accusation it must fairly be 
allowed that during the Presidentships of Wilkinson and Goodwin 
some very able and good men of their party were introduced into 
Hist, of the Great Rebellion, book x. vol. v. p. 482, Oxf. ed. 



INTRODUCTION. CV11 

the College in every department. A majority of the Demies so 
introduced became Conformists." * 

The same may be said of nearly every College. Whatever neces- 
sary, or even unnecessary, violence had accompanied the Parlia- 
mentary reform, whatever the loss sustained by the temporary de- 
pression of the Church, we cannot fail to observe that the University 
at least kept up its high character as a place of religion and seat of 
learning; and that it did so all along in close connection with by 
far the larger portion of its ancient Statutes, customs, and traditions. 
The more vehement reformers, having ousted their equally vehe- 
ment opponents, soon themselves passed away. Extreme had met 
extreme. " Root and Branch " had succeeded to " Thorough." 
Both had gone. Surviving the tumultuous conflicts of the two 
turbulent eddies, if we may apply a metaphor formerly used in a 
different sense, but equally true, the vessel floats on the great 
tranquil body of the stream much as before; a stream, like its own 
Isis in its devious course, somewhat coloured indeed by the last 
flood-water and about to be somewhat coloured once more by the 
next flood- water of the Restoration ; but, in spite of all, substantially 
the same. This is why in the former chapter it seemed well to study 
the careers of such men as Reynolds, Owen, and Conant. They were 
the real pilots of the ship, and in comprehending their work at 
Oxford, and its connection with the past history of the University, 
we learn to master the problem which Lord Clarendon resigned to 
the domain of miracle, and which less candid historians have not 
condescended to notice as a problem at all. 

Vol. ii. p. cxvii. 



CV111 INTRODUCTION. 



CHAPTER V. 
THE STATE OP OXFORD COLLEGES. 

It would be very desirable to present the reader with an account 
of the state of each of the Oxford Colleges during the period under 
review. The Editor was sanguine enough at first to hope that 
enough might have been found in the different College archives 
to have eked out such slight suggestive notices as appear in the 
Visitors' Register ; but in this he has been disappointed; nor do the 
volumes of the Historical Manuscript Commission add anything 
worth mention to the information afforded by the documents now 
published for the first time. All characteristic traces of the Visita- 
tion seem to have disappeared from the records of the institutions 
which felt its hand. No such journal of any Head or Fellow of 
a College as could be useful seems to have survived. We have 
seen that Conant's Life affords an exceptional glance at the state of 
Exeter College. Crosfield's MS. Diary, which might have done still 
more for Queen's, is silent during the whole of our period, owing 
to the absence of the author from Oxford. The previous part 
has been skilfully used for the edition of Laud's History of his 
Chancellorship^ already quoted. Wood used what meagre materials 
of this sort could be found in the collection of Archbishop Sheldon ; 
but, with the exception of the general colouring which his own 
Life supplies, we search his books in vain for anything like real 
light which might illustrate the inner life of the Colleges or of 
individuals at this time, or which might unfold before us the actual 
working of the system which produced the general results noticed 
in the last chapter. In some respects this is the best testimony to 
its success. Happy is the College which has no history; but it is 
so much the worse for the historian. 



INTRODUCTION. cix 

It may, however, be of some use to collect the scattered notices 
which come to hand, and at least to group together those Colleges 
which admit of such treatment. 

Out of the eighteen Colleges then existing, only two went heartily 
from the very beginning with the Visitors and the Parliament, viz. 
Merton and Lincoln, and both of these gave them at different times 
nearly as much trouble as any ; Merton, through the influence of 
some few Royalist Fellows who had been suffered to remain, 8 and also 
through the connection of the Warden, Sir Nathaniel Brent, with 
the quarrel between the London Committee and the Visitors; 
Lincoln also, in spite of its compliant Rector, Paul Hood, through 
the latter cause. 

It is impossible to estimate too highly the importance of Merton 
to the Visitors at the outset of their difficult task ; for they had 
little support elsewhere. Their President was its Warden ; the 
high offices which he had held in the State had given him influ- 
ence in the College ; the ablest men of the new government were 
drawn from the ranks of its Fellows; and a large proportion of 
those members of the College who were cited, very naturally gave 
in their submission. Merton was thus one of the few Colleges 
which obtained self-government at an early date. Besides this it 
was the only one of the six ancient Foundations, preceding New 
College, which, by the ample income of its Warden and the mag- 
nitude of the original benefaction, had for a long period taken rank 
as a great College, the other five having in early times been compa- 
ratively feeble; and it already had a great mediaeval history, sur- 
rounding the College with the halo of world-renowned names. Even 
at this time there were few more distinguished men of science than 
Greaves and Turner. But it was not the leading institution of the 
University at this period, nor did it become so. 'The Visitors were 
fortunate in very soon securing for themselves a College which 
certainly held one of the highest places among its fellows, Exeter. 

a This was evinced not only by the acts of certain persons, but by the election 
of men as " Postmasters " who had refused to submit to the Visitation. 
CAMD. SOC. p 



CX INTRODUCTION. . 

Enough has been said in a former Chapter, and will be found in 
the Notes, to justify the position here assigned to the Devonshire 
College. It was not a wealthy foundation ; the income of its Rector 
was one of die lowest of all ; a its early history had not been so dis- 
tinguished as that of some others. But Sir William Petre, its 
"second founder," gave the College, a great impetus, and in the 
latter part of the reign of Elizabeth, and under James and Charles, 
it had achieved an extraordinary reputation. The success thus 
attained, which was chiefly owing to Holland and Prideaux, but 
especially the last, was great enough to tide it over the period of 
the Civil war, and to enable it, under Conant, speedily to resume 
its old position. It had indeed suffered grievously ; and waSj like 
the majority of its neighbours, in debt; but its good management 
and discipline brought reputation and numbers, under which the 
incumbrance soon disappeared. When the Visitation commenced in 
earnest it was found that the College was pretty evenly -divided. The 
famous West-country loyalty was however strongly represented among 
the Fellows, and Henry Tozer, the Sub-rector^ made, as we have 

a Exeter is one of ten Colleges, the Heads of which petitioned Cromwell (Feb. 28, 
1654) for payment of " arrears of augmentations to tlreir places and constant pay- 
ment in future," on the ground that "our places are so poor as not to afford a com- 
petent maintenance, and on account of our augmentations we are debarred the, 
enjoyment of such places of emolument as were formerly allowed." The Petition 
was granted, and the arrears paid. The names of the Heads of these Colleges stand in 
the .following order, which appears to be that of seniority: Lincoln, Queen's, Uni- 
versity, Brasenose,Wadham,Trinity, St. John's, Exeter, Jesus, and Balliol. Pembroke 
is mentioned at an earlier date (July 27, 1 653) in this connection" the augmentation , 
of Pembroke College " but not in special reference to the Headship. Oriel is the 
only College which, being reported by the Visitors " to stand in neede of augmenta- 
tion " (July 26, 1649), is not named in any document registered in the latest volumes 
of the Calendar of State Papers, 1653, 1654, from which the above extracts are taken. 
The " augmentations" had been granted, in consequence of the Report of the Visitors- 
(Register, pp. 246, 251, 252), out of the public Treasury, probably out of the fund 
produced by the Firstfruits and Tenths, which had previously belonged to the Crown, 
but were, now set aside for purposes of this kind. It was these which, at a later 
date, formed " Queen Anne's Bounty." (The above Petition of the Heads should 
have been mentioned in the note to pp. 251-2; but it had not attracted the attention 
of the Editor in time to insert it in its proper place.) 



INTRODUCTION. Clci 

seen, a gallant attempt to rally his brethren round the Cavalier flag. 
His patronage of a " scandalous person and man of blood," and of 
one who " drank confusion to the reformers/' while he discouraged 
grievously " an ingenious youth of tender conscience," is fiercely 
resented by the Visitors ; but few people gave them more trouble to 
eject; and, when this was at last secured, so necessary was he to his 
College that several Orders were required to smooth the way for his 
return.* However when the cause became absolutely hopeless, and 
several new Fellows had been appointed in the place of those expelled, 
the leaning of the College in the direction of the theological views 
of the Visitation, acquired during a long period of almost unbroken 
tradition j soon asserted itself, and resistance altogether ceased. In 
the very month of the King's " execution " the College is pronounced 
to be " so reformed and constituted in the members thereof as that 
the Fellows are in a fit capacity to do all such acts as concern the 
good of that House " (p. 219)$ and are accordingly allowed to elect 
their own Rector. The circumstances of that Rectorship have been 
described, as also the evidence, afforded by the continuance of such 
tutors as Acland and pupils as Bull in the College, of the moderation 
which distinguished the tone of the Society at the most critical period 
of its existence. To sum up and interpret its career; the College 
had exhibited that combination of loyalty to the sovereign with dis- 
approval of the errors of his civil and ecclesiastical advisers, which 
marked the course of a few pre-eminent men at the opening period of 
the Great Rebellion ; had fought and suffered in the royal cause ; had 
then gathered itself together with steady resolution and without loss 
of time, to fulfil its one main vocation the promotion of religion, 
learning, and education ; had borne such changes with resignation as 

Tozer had been a decided anti-Anninian, probably of Prideanx' school, one of the 
Assembly of Divines (though he did not attend), a good preacher, and the author of 
popular devotional Works. He died at Rotterdam in 1660. Archbishop Fssher's 
influence on the College should not be forgotten. He resided for some time during 
the war in a part of the buildings now destroyed, but the woodwork from which 
was transferred to " Prideaux Buildings," erected of late years between the College 
and Mr. Parker's house, facing the Tori. (Boase's Reg. Exon, p. 197.) 



CXli INTRODUCTION. 

could not be avoided ; and by honestly doing its duty it conquered 
at last. It deserved the reputation which it obtained. Much the 
same thing might indeed be said of the career of some other Colleges, 
but we happen to have the most distinct evidence in the case of 
Exeter. 

Christchurch next claims our attention. In spite of a pre- 
ponderance of Non-submitters there was a very large body of 
persons who either at once, or eventually, submitted ; which, remem- 
bering the great influence possessed in the House by the Dean 
and Chapter, as well as who they had been, we should hardly 
have expected. Samuel Fell, the Dean, and John Fell, his son, 
who, when he afterwards succeeded as Dean at the Kestoration, 
became Bishop of Oxford, and was the leading man of his time 
in the University, were both of them vehement and uncompromising 
Royalists. They were assisted by Dolben and Allestree. Hammond 
we have seen devoting his extraordinary powers to the training 
of the young men of the House as soon as the war was over; 
Morley and Sanderson, leaders of their generation, lies and Gar- 
diner, men of the highest character, were Canons; and all of 
them agreed in the most absolute refusal to acknowledge the 
Visitation. 

The cause of the phenomenon is probably to be found in the con- 
nection with Westminster School, from whence the Nonconformist 
element, dominant in London, made its way into the Student- 
ships ; and this influence, when the changes had once taken place 
in the great offices, being no longer impeded by opposition, soon 
leavened the whole Society. Though the Royalists made their 
presence felt, Reynolds, Button, Wilkinson, and Cornish used their 
opportunity with effect; and the learned Dr. Wall, who speedily 
recanted his non-submission, supplied an important link between 
the past and present work of the institution. Christchurch is the 
next College after Exeter which appears by the Register to have 
been entrusted with self-government ; and yet very few new 
appointments, considering the magnitude of its Foundation, had 



INTRODUCTION. CX111 

been made by the Visitors, and very few further expulsions took 
place when the Independents became supreme.* Owen in his turn 
was also a good disciplinarian. Thus, in spite of its mixed character 
we hear very little of Christchurch, a sure sign that it had betaken 
itself to its work, and it shared with Wadham, Queen's, Brasenose, 
and Pembroke the distinction of making the largest increase in 
the number of its undergraduates at the opening of the period 
of the Visitation. It speaks well for the ejected Students who 
remained in Oxford that they were content to remain quiet, and to 
exercise such influence as they could for the Church without foster- 
ing division. Philip Henry's gratitude for the assistance he gained 
at Christchurch during the interval before the Visitation commenced 
in earnest, has been already noticed. We also read that, looking 
back at his whole career at Oxford, " he would often mention it 
with thankfulness to God what great helps and advantages he had 
then in the University, not only for learning, but also for religion 
and piety." b This must reflect back in the first place on his own 
College. Christchurch boasts the great name of Locke during this 
period ; and South, the wittiest of preachers, came up from West- 
minster in 1651. Locke followed him in 1652. 

Magdalen also, from a cause not altogether dissimilar and more 
clearly visible, came, though at a later date, completely under the 
Visitors' influence. There was, when the war broke out, no more 
decidedly Royalist College. None had taken up the Laudian move- 
ment with more energy. There were no keener controversialists 
in England than Hammond, Heylin, and Pierce, all Magdalen 
men. Scarcely was any College more largely filled up with new 

* In the Journal of the House of Commons, Jane 21, 1660, will be found an Order 
to the Committee for the Universities to examine what officers, &c., neglect or refuse 
to take the Engagement, " with power to displace such officers, &c.," and to replace 
them by others. It has been already noticed how this order affected Reynolds, Mills, 
Cheynell, and Pocock; and the Register shows how it led to the quarrel between the 
Committee and the Visitors; but its immediate effects were chiefly confined to Christ- 
church. 

b Life, as above, p. 146. 



CX1V INTRODUCTION. 

members by the Visitors. Yet the change from its old character had 
not taken place so very long. In James's reign we have seen that 
it had been "a very nest of Puritans," and there had still remained 
in the College an active, if small, minority, with whom the Wilkin- 
sons had been allied ; their turn had now come. Magdalen Hall, 
then standing under the shadow of its great companion, or rather 
parent, had retained its " Puritan " complexion when the College 
threw it off; and the connection which existed between them made 
it a natural refuge for those of the College who disliked the change 
which was taking place. The relations between the two institutions 
were thus not always harmonious ; and it is probably through the 
channel of the Hall that the Puritan influences made their way 
back to the College when the Visitation turned the scale. Dr. 
Wilkinson, the new President, had been a very successful Principal 
of the Hall before he became President of the College, and every 
member of the Hall without exception gave in his submission, to 
the number of forty-nine in all. Dr. Harris, one of the seven Pres- 
byterian preachers sent to prepare the way for the Visitation, and 
afterwards appointed President of Trinity, had been a prominent 
member of the Hall, as also the fiery Henry Wilkinson, senior, who 
ook, with Cheynell, the lead in the earlier and harsher part of the 
Visitation, The Hall was thus not only a numerous but a very 
powerful body, which must have exercised great influence upon the 
College at such a crisis. 

Goodwin, again, who succeeded Dr. Wilkinson as President of 
]\Iagdalen, one of the leaders of the new government, was not the 
man to let the College slip back into its old courses. As Head of an 
Oxford House he bears a reputation of a somewhat ridiculous 
character, chiefly on the strength of his numerous head-coverings, 
which procured him the name of " Nine-Caps," and, since that 
date, through the anecdote which Addison has handed down in 
the Spectator concerning young Anthony Henley's examination for 
a Demyship. With his usual humour the essayist describes the 
youth ushered into a darkened room, lighted by a single taper, and 



INTRODUCTION. CXV 

an awful personage demanding answers to searching questions, not 
as to his learning but his spiritual condition, concluding with the 
sepulchral sentence: "Are you prepared for death?" Once escaped, 
the frightened lad could never again be brought to face the terrors 
of an Oxford examination. So good a story was worth passing 
down, but good stories do not decide historical questions; and' 
Goodwin's position as a leader of his generation is well ascertained. 
Perhaps, however,. it was the knowledge of the fact that the old 
man did lay himself open 1 to ridicule which prevented Cromwell 
from placing him in Owen's office as Vice-Chancellor, when that 
able functionary was superseded by Goodwin in Cromwell's good 
graces as a religious reformer of the University. 

It has been already remarked that the hints which we find in 
authors as to the avaricious conduct of these intruded Heads of 
Houses are not deserving of entire attention. The Register supplies 
ample evidence of the extreme difficulty experienced in obtaining 
command'of the 'funds of the Colleges, and the Magdalen Bursar 
(who was also Steward) was not one of the most easy to " bring to 
book.'* With regard'to the sort of men with whom the College 
was supplied during the Visitation, Dr. Bloxam's testimony has 
been already quoted. 

On the whole we may regard Magdalen as ai College which was 
efficiently -worked at this period, and, from its wealth and importance, 
one of those on which the Visitors most relied in their arduous task. 
Thus we find it electing its own Fellows as early as January 1649-50. a 
Wood does indeed tell us that it shared with New College and 
All Souls the discredit of being notorious for corrupt elections to 
Fellowships; but it does not receive, like those two Colleges, special 
Orders on the subject. Its Royalist character had disappeared, 
but it is possible that the new men had, like some of their neigh- 
bours, learnt the old lesson. The accusation is repeated in 1674. b 

Magdalen ought to be added to the list of Colleges (p. 365) receiving freedom to 
elect at an early date. " Magdalen-tyde" (p. 277) means the period from July 22 ^ 
(Fest. S. M. Magd.) to the octave. 

b Letters of Humphrey Prideaux, p. 2 (Camden Soc.) 



CXV1 INTRODUCTION. 

In contrast to these last three Colleges stand out three others 
in which the spirit of opposition to the Visitors was only par- 
tially subdued, and repeatedly broke out again in a way which 
gave much trouble, viz., New College, All Souls, and Jesus. The 
first two were large and wealthy Foundations of an exceptional 
character, both from the number of lawyers they contained and the 
total exclusion of Commoners. The third was the gallant, not to 
say stubborn, little Welsh College, which nothing could effectually 
tame till the King, for whose family many brave Welshmen had 
died, came to his own again. 

To take it first, Jesus College had good reason to be proud of 
the condition in which it had only recently been placed by the self- 
sacrificing efforts of its Principal, Dr. Mansell; and there was a 
remarkable circumstance in the history of this Principal which 
distinguishes Jesus from all other Colleges. We have seen him, 
along with his relatives in Carmarthenshire, taking a more than 
ordinary part in the war in Wales, and then, when the Visitation 
commenced, holding out to the last for his College. At length 
expelled, he retired to Wales for some years, living in poverty and 
enduring serious persecution, but all the while providing for the 
careful training of several young men of Cavalier families under his 
own eye. These he placed under the immediate superintendence of 
Leoline Jenkins, a youth whom he had himself most thoroughly 
trained, and who afterwards became celebrated as Sir Leoline 
Jenkins, Principal of Jesus, Secretary of State, and Ambassador in 
the reign of Charles the Second. He proved well worthy of his edu- 
cation, and exhibited a noble contrast to the debased courtiers of that 
reign, his capacity for great offices being only equalled by his blame- 
less life and devout churchmanship. It is from his short Memoir of 
his revered master that we obtain some slight acquaintance with the 
affairs of the College, in addition to what we learn from the Register.* 

The following notice of Oxford studies may be extracted from the Life of Sir 
Leoline Jenkins, by Wynne (1724). When the future statesman was residing in 
Oxford with his pupils in 1652, he writes thus "to the vertuous and noble Lady A" 



INTRODUCTION. CXV11 

When the nation had settled down for a time under Cromwell, 
and a more liberal treatment of the Cavaliers at Oxford had become 
possible, Dr. Mansell removed there along with Jenkins and his 
pupils, forming a portion of that congregation of Churchmen to 
whom the Christchurch Students ministered. Not long afterwards 
he accepted rooms in his old College (p. 413), and remained there for 
the eight years preceding the Restoration. This is a very curious fact. 
When we reflect upon the unique and sustained struggle of the 
College all through the period, the large expulsion of Fellows and 
Scholars which took place, and yet the obstinate refusal of those 
that remained to admit the nominees of the Visitors, a refusal only 
overcome by physical force ; when we observe how absolutely these 
new members were absorbed by the old, and how they never ceased 
from opposition to the intruded Principal, Roberts; when we read 
their appeals against Roberts (contrary to all existing order), to 
their proper Visitor, the Earl of Pembroke, and then to the 
Protector in Council, the account of their audacious deposition of 
Roberts, and the declaration by the Visitors amongst their latest 
Orders that the College is in an " unsettled " condition, it is 
impossible to avoid the reflection that some part of this might have 
been connected with the counsels of Dr. Mansell at first, his pre- 
sence afterwards; yet we never hear a word about him in reference 
to it. If he had received even a hint to depart we should have heard 
of it from Sir Leoline Jenkins. No doubt, being a man of Spartan 
virtue, he maintained, when once inside the College, a Spartan silenec. 
Perhaps the mere presence of such a man within a few yards of so 
unpopular a Principal as Roberts was of itself a motive power. The 

about her son : " I hope in time to bring him acquainted with Logick and Philosophy 
(the chief learning of this place), which, if understood, will be an excellent help to 
manage his reason and discourse, so as to speak concludent to any purpose." It 
may be worth noting that the character of Sir L. Jenkins stood so high that it was 
commonly reported he was to take Orders, and succeed Sheldon as Archbishop of 
Canterbury. (Letters of Humphrey Prideanx, p. 54.) For an acquaintance with 
his Life of Mansell the writer is indebted to the Kv. W. Dyke, of Jesus, who printed 
the book in 1854. 

CAMD. SOC. a 



CXV111 INTRODUCTION. 

Visitors should, at any rate, receive some credit for generosity in 
suffering him to remain. 

If it is not going too much out of our way, the remark may here 
be made that it would be difficult to find two cases in which learning, 
ability, character, conscientiousness, earnestness, self-sacrifice, led 
men into two more distinctly opposite careers than those of Mansell 
and Conant. The work of the latter has been sufficiently described 
to enable the reader to make the contrast for himself; and the con- 
sideration may warn us against the tempting habit of forming too 
positive judgments on the men of those times. 

With regard to the other two recalcitrant Colleges, the Kegister 
affords us almost the only light we can obtain, except on the one 
point of Corrupt Elections, and for this the reader is referred to 
the Notes in pp. 363, 420, 421, 423, 427, 428, and to the references 
there given. It is impossible -not to connect this special fault of 
New College and All Souls with the other special distinctions which 
they possessed in common. For the same original reason (though 
others tended to strengthen it), viz. the inadequacy of their buildings 
for more residents than their large Foundations provided, they were 
almost the only exceptions to the practice of taking Commoners. 
There was not therefore the same body of men as at nearly all the 
other Colleges, present or on the books, uninterested in the sale of 
Fellowships, and so forming a natural self-acting check on such a 
practice. But this of itself would not be enough to account for the 
facts. We must look to the large number of lawyers which both 
Colleges, and they alone, possessed. The study and practice of law 
almost necessarily carried with it a system of non-residence, and 
therefore exposed men to the temptation to make the best bargain 
possible on resigning a position to which non-residents of course 
felt themselves less tied than others; and, further, legal ingenuity 
was largely called into play for the invention of methods of evasion, 
as may be seen in the history of All Souls. Finally, when these 
causes once began to operate, the very magnitude of the Founda- 
tions, bringing with it frequent elections, hardened the practice 



INTRODUCTION. cxix 

all the more readily into a system, which came to convey no more 
idea of immorality than that of the recent Purchase in the Army. 
The practice of " recommending " for vacant Fellowships, which 
was so common at the hands of kings, Visitors, and nobles, ought to 
share some part of the blame. Men argued that, if freedom of 
elections was to be overborne in one direction, why not evaded in 
another? 

The bearing of this practice upon other difficulties experienced 
by the Visitors in relation to the two Colleges is obvious. Though 
numerous ejections had take place, several of the Koyalist Fellows 
contrived to remain in spite of previous refusals to submit ; and, 
as at Jesus College, they soon infused their spirit into the new 
members. As time went on, and freedom of election was granted 
among persons already furnished with testimonials by the Committee 
of Visitors, the Fellows were still able, as we see by the Register, to 
select those who were willing to pay the proper price ; and such persons 
became, ipso facto, sworn adherents of the party of opposition. 

At New College the Visitors laboured under the further difficulty 
of having two roots to pluck up one at Winchester and one at Oxford ; 
and here the feeder was probably of the same Cavalier character 
as the trunk. The College had also begun ill for the Visitors. The 
former Warden, Dr. Pink, had been a man of some distinction, and 
had died during the feebler period of the Visitation. The Visitors 
had been obliged to look on while the Fellows elected, in spite of their 
prohibition, Dr. Stringer, the Greek Eeader, as Warden. He had 
kept his place in defiance of them for more than a year; and, on his 
declining to submit, great difficulty had been found in ejecting 
him. Marshall, the new Warden, does not appear to exercise much 
influence ; and the College, like All Souls under its non-resident 
Warden, Palmer, goes very much its own way. 

Thus the Visitors always seem to be personally governing both 
Colleges, rearranging their constitution, appointing College officers, 
and freely administering rebuke and advice. They pass off the 
stage in internecine conflict with All Souls, on which College they 



CXX INTRODUCTION. 

pour the fullest vials of their wrath. By their own account they 
signally failed to make any impression on it ; and it may be 
doubted whether they were much more successful at New College 
or Jesus. All Souls, however, can never forget that under the rule 
of the Visitors it obtained at least five distinguished Fellows, viz. 
Sydenham, the father of modern English medical science, Wren, 
the greatest architect of his age, Millington, Pett, and Trumbull; a 
and these were not the only men of mark so appointed. It was 
a very long time before the College, when left to its own devices 
and freed from the yoke under which it had groaned and kicked, 
could match these appointments. New College was rendered illus- 
trious at this time by having nursed the early genius of the saintly 
Ken under its roof. Notices of his devotion to music will be found 
in the Annals. Holloway, the Eoyalist steward of the College, 
who had fought for the king, and held out against the Visitors till 
the cause was hopeless, lived to be a judge of the Court of King's 
Bench; and, as such, to exhibit, after an interval of forty years, the 
same loyalty to the Stuart House, and yet the same independent cha- 
racter, in the Acquittal of the Seven Bishops. He was of a remark- 
able Oxford family, of which some notices will be found in Wood. 

The remaining Colleges offer less subject for remark. 

Two other considerable Foundations, besides those already 
noticed, Corpus and St. John's, were as strongly devoted to the 
cause of the King as any, and experienced wholesale ejections; but, 
though troublesome at first to the Visitors from this cause, we hear 
but little of them afterwards. Both Colleges were subjected to in- 
vasions of their Statutes or endowments, but, as will be seen in the 
Notes, not without justification. There are indeed some traces in 
the Register of a recalcitrant spirit at Corpus ; b but Cheynell, an 
old controversial opponent of Laud, who found himself, at St. 
John's, in the office made illustrious by two successive Primates, no 
doubt took efficient precautions against retrogressive movements in 

See W. of All Soult, p. 241. 
*> See Note, p. 244. 



INTRODUCTION. CXX1 

that College ; yet even he could not swallow the Engagement, and 
found himself in his turn superseded by Thankful Owen, another 
leading Visitor. 

Queen's, Brasenose, Trinity, and Wadham, may be classed together 
as Colleges at that time of somewhat inferior importance to the fore- 
going, but all exhibiting like them a majority of persons who at first 
refused to submit. They also speedily recovered their working order, 
and gave but little trouble to theVisitors. Wadham and Trinity must 
be singled out as Colleges which received early permission to elect 
Fellows. But at Wadham (which became a very popular College) 
difficulties arose at a later date in consequence of disagreements 
between Warden Wilkins and the Fellows, arising probably from the 
prolonged absences of the Warden, when attending on the " Prince 
Elector" (p. 222). The Visitors decided in his favour. This dis- 
tinguished and very able man, after his marriage with Cromwell's 
sister, was preferred to the Mastership of Trinity College, Cambridge. 
That Christopher Wren owed his education to Wadham before he 
became a Fellow of All Souls, and notably to the care of Warden 
Wilkins, must always be one of the glories of the College, which 
had already produced the naval hero of the Commonwealth, Admiral 
Blake. Sprat, the future Bishop of Rochester, and historian of the 
Royal Society, was also educated under Wilkins at this time ; 
and Seth Ward, the Professor of Astronomy, and future Bishop of 
Salisbury, was a member of the College. He had migrated from 
Cambridge. 

At Trinity the parties were more evenly divided than at most 
Colleges ; but it affords a remarkable instance of a College in which 
the larger part of the Non-submitters, at least amongst the Fellows, 
were allowed to remain on, and yet where they gave no disturbance. 
No doubt Ralph Bathurst, a leading Fellow, and the future Pre- 
sident, should be credited with using his influence for good (p. 121), 
but the result must also be due in great part to Dr. Harris, the 
President appointed by the Visitors with almost absolute power 
(p. Ill), whose character has been unjustly depreciated by Wood. 



CXX11 INTRODUCTION. 

Though already an old man, he was still vigorous, and he certainly 
was an "accomplished Greek and Latin scholar." War ton calls 
him "a man of candour"; and his orthodox Sermons, like those of 
Reynolds and Conant, may still be appealed to for proof of the prac- 
tical, high-toned, and sensible character of the preacher. The praises 
bestowed upon him by Dr. Bathurst may well cover Wood's charges ; a 
and if he is concerned in taking improperly large fines for a College 
lease, for which the circumstances might, if we knew them, account, 
he at least made liberal grants to the posterity of Sir Thomas Pope, 
the Founder of his adopted College, an act of rare generosity at such 
a time. b It may also be noticed that the learned Daniel Whitby 
was educated at Trinity during this period. 

Queen's College may be classed with Exeter in some respects. It 
possessed not only, like Trinity, a large body of Graduates who refused 
at first to submit, and yet several of whom were suffered to remain 
on quietly doing their work, but two at least of them were amongst 
the chief leaders of the University; and it attracted large numbers 
of undergraduates. The Provost, Dr. Langbaine, did indeed submit, 
but he was an undisguised Royalist. Being a man of considerable 
reputation as a scholar, tutor, and author, he set the tone of practical 
submission for his College, which seems, as far as we can judge 
by the Register, to have set to work with a good will. The best 
proof of this is, that it appears to have received permission to elect 
its own officers as early as any College, though nothing to this effect 
is found in the Visitors' Register. In the College Register this 
permission is virtually granted on Jan. 16, 1648-9 ; yet we find the 
Visitors appointing a Taberdar in 1650 and a Fellow in 1651; and 
in the latter year (May 29) the College is declared to be " not in a 
capacity to elect in a statutable way." In April 1652, on the other 
hand, the London Committee grant the College full freedom of 
election. There is no clue to these discrepancies and fluctuations, 

See Note, p. 80. 

b See Durham's Life of Harris (1660), Warton's Life of Bathurtt, Chalmer's 
Biog. Diet., Wood's AtJi. Ox. and Annals. 



INTRODUCTION. CXX111 

except in connection with the quarrels between the two Committees 
already noticed, to which may be added the unusually mild inter- 
pretation which had been put upon the terms of Non-submission 
used at first by several of the Fellows, due no doubt to the influence 
with the Visitors possessed by the Provost. 

Thomas Barlow, a man of still more importance, substantially 
took the same line. 8 He was a Non-submitter, and consequently 
ordered for expulsion, but made his peace, according to Wood, by 
bribing the wife of the Governor of Oxford. b He was in the habit 
of writing clever letters, describing the state of affairs in the Uni- 
versity, to Sheldon and others, as well as printed fly-sheets, bitter 
and one-sided enough, but, as we have seen in a previous chapter, 
incorporated wholesale into Wood's Annals. That author describes 
Barlow's subsequent tergiversations, but gives him credit for being 
" a great scholar, and profoundly learned both in Divinity and in 
the Civil and Canon Law." After becoming Bodley's Librarian, 
Provost of Queen's, and Margaret Professor of Divinity, he ended 
his days as a non-resident Bishop of Lincoln a " thorough -paced 
Calvinist " all the while, says Wood, who may indeed have had 
some grudge against him, for Barlow is often quoted with the 
greatest respect by his contemporaries, and was a friend of Lord 
Falkland's. As far as his line of conduct during the Visitation is 
concerned, we may be sure that it was by no means singular, but on 
the contrary distinctly typical. 

Perhaps Brasenose also owed its comparative good order and 

a Langbaine and Barlow began life, and went on afterwards, together. They 
were admitted to Queen's in 1625 as servientes ad mensam, and in 1630 in 
pauper es puerog ; and they became Scholars together in 1633. On the death of 
Langbaine in 1667, Barlow succeeded him as ProTOst. When preferred to the 
bishopric of Lincoln, he takes leave of the College (in 1677) in an eloquent letter, 
referring to the " 52 years compleat " which had passed " since I had the happiness 
to be admitted into our House, and ever since have had encouragement and sub- 
sistence from my dear mother the College." Queen's College Register, to which 
access was afforded by the kindness of the Provost, Dr. Magrath. 

b Ath. Ox. vol. iv. p. 334. c See Barlow's Remains, by Sir Peter Pett. 



CXX1V INTRODUCTION. 

popularity to the Principal, Daniel Greenwood, appointed by the 
Visitors. Its complexion had been as thoroughly Royalist as any. 
Non-submitters were in a large majority; and even when the Visitors 
had been in full power for some time, and expulsions proceeding 
with vigour, we have seen that the six senior Fellows, taking no 
notice of Greenwood's appointment, met and elected as Principal, 
Thomas Yate, one of their own number, in the vacancy caused 
by the death of Dr. Eadcliffe. We hear, however, of no further 
opposition to Greenwood when he had taken his place. Yate was at 
once ejected. 8 Greenwood has come before us as Vice-Chancellor 
at a critical period; and, as no worse fault can be found with him by 
the captious Wood than one which is an evident virtue under the 
circumstances, we may be sure he was a man of merit, if not of 
any conspicuous mark. An unfortunate squint afforded a butt for 
the lampooners of the day. 

A distinguished man is found among the Parliamentary Fellows 
of Brasenose, the well-known Sir William Petty, of whom some 
mention is made in a Note to p. 335. In reference to him and 
to another Fellow appointed by the Visitors, Samuel Bruen, an 
interesting fact appears in the Register. In the spirit of so many of 
the old Statutes they are both granted leave to travel, keeping their 
Fellowships for two years ; Petty to pursue the work which led to the 
great Irish Survey; Bruen, perhaps, to assist him. This sort of 
permission is only found in the Register at Brasenose, Trinity, New 
College, and Oriel; but that Fellows of Colleges were largely 
employed during the Commonwealth in the Royal Navy, in Ire- 
land, and elsewhere, retaining their stipends, may be seen from the 
College Registers, as, for example, that of New College. b It was 
from the diary of a sturdy Royalist of this College, John Newton, 

See Note, p. 139. 

b For these facts and some others connected with New College the writer has to 
thank the Warden, Dr. Sewell. The state of the old Register in that College affords 
a pleasing contrast to the state of the Register in some others, but even here the 
identification of several names has been found impossible. 



INTRODUCTION. CXXV 

one of the six " Yate Fellows," that Wood obtained much of the 
information concerning the earlier period of the Visitation, which 
he inserts for the most part just as it stands. 

Oriel and University are distinguished by occupying more space 
in the Kegister than most Colleges, but rather from difficulties 
which are more or less accidental, or connected with debt, than in 
the way of continuous opposition. Oriel had been, at the opening 
of the Visitation, strongly on the side of the Cavaliers, and in the 
absence of Provost Saunders we have seen Robert Say, the Dean 
and future Provost, both during the Visitation and after the 
Restoration (when he is one of those who sign the solemn condemna- 
tion of all the Visitors' proceedings), heading the opposition; but 
Saunders set an example which was followed by several other 
members of his College. He distinctly refused to submit, yet 
contrived to keep his place for years. So also we find Say 
and several of the Fellows refusing to submit, and yet "they 
kept their places by the same means that others did " (p. 65) ; and 
we find these same men electing Say to the office of Provost in 
1653. Thus, though a few expulsions took place, the College 
seems not to have been very strongly marked on either side of the 
great questions at issue. But at quite a late date the Visitors will 
not admit that it is sufficiently "reduced" to entitle it to the 
enjoyment of any independence. 

Some of these extremely ancient Colleges, as University, Balliol, 
and Oriel, were much hampered by the inadequacy of their endow- 
ments, which had been sufficient for early and simple days, but had 
not as yet received the needful additions. They had long ago been 
surpassed and thrown into the shade by later Foundations. Such a 
crisis as the Great Rebellion tried them severely. 

As to Balliol, we have seen that it scarcely attempted to restore 
its dilapidations before the end of the century. Like the large 
majority of its neighbours, it had been at first strongly Royalist, 
but several men submitted afterwards. Lawrence, its distinguished 
Master, had been appointed Margaret Professor of Divinity under 

CAMD. soc. r 



CXXV1 INTRODUCTION. 

the influence of Laud, who speaks of him as an " able and 
careful " but " sickly " man. a The infirm state of his health 
may perhaps account for the vacillations or delays which are 
referred to in connection with his submission and resignation in 
the Notes to pp. 167 and 188. Bradshaw, his successor, had gone 
with the Visitors from the first. Like Greenwood at Brasenose, 
and Harris at Trinity, he, with the help of the newly-appointed 
Fellows, at least contrived to keep his College quiet. The same 
may be said of Savage, who succeeded as Master in 1650, but who 
had been under sentence of Expulsion in 1648. 

The poverty of the ancient Colleges accounts for the debts 
which they contracted in such unquiet times, and of which we find 
constant mention in the Register. Out of the original six founded 
before New College, and surviving the Reformation, Merton alone 
was rich enough to escape this disastrous fate. b Some later Founda- 
tions which were also not rich were in the same predicament. The 
debts of Brasenose, Jesus, and Wadham, exercised the Visitors. But 
University College, the oldest of all, seems to have felt the pressure 
most of all; the Master and Fellows were actually at one time 
non-resident (p. 289); and, what made the matter worse, the Visitors 
committed the error of appointing more Fellows and Scholars than 
the indebted College could support. The same mistake, not an un- 
natural one under the circumstances, was made in a less degree 
elsewhere; but at University it was necessary to settle afresh, and 
then to resettle, the Foundation on various schemes, and, in the 
process, to do considerable injustice to some who were suffering 
from no fault of their own. The Register, however, bears evi- 
dence of the progress which, in spite of the debt, was made at 
this period in rebuilding the College. The work had been com- 
menced, like many other architectural improvements, under Laud's 
Chancellorship, but suspended during the troubles. 

Laud's Works as above, vol. v. p. 244. 

b It should be mentioned that one of these, Queen's, had made an exceptionally 
large contribution to Charles the First, in reply to his letters of request in 1642. 

The present Convocation House was built under Laud's auspices, and first used 



INTRODUCTION. CXXvii 

University College was also curiously distinguished by being 
placed under the reforming hands of two former members of Trinity 
College, Dublin. Washington had been Provost of Trinity, and 
Hoyle Professor of Divinity there, before the Irish Kebellion. The 
Register shows how implicitly the former of these was trusted by 
the Visitors; the latter, a person of some distinction, attempted to 
eke out a narrow stipend as Master of the College, by accepting the 
Eegius Professorship of Divinity, but, unfortunately for him, the 
Christchurch Canonry which was appropriated for that office had 
already been assigned to another, and Hoyle seems to have gained 
nothing further from Christchurch than to be " entered into the 
Buttery Book," perhaps as Student (p. 215). The notorious Obadiah 
Walker, of whom we know so much, forty years later, as James the 
Second's intruded Roman Catholic Master of the College, is now 
first heard of as one of the Fellows expelled from thence for Non- 
submission ; and Tonge, who filled one of the vacant places, became 
equally notorious in connection with Titus Gates. 

Lincoln and Pembroke, two of the smaller Foundations, alone 
remain. As to the first, it will be seen by the Register that it was 
most unfortunate in being made the battle-ground between the 
Visitors and the London Committee, and that the conduct of the 
latter in putting some worthless men into the College, and insisting 
on their being retained, almost broke up the Society, which was 
already unfortunate, as far as we can judge from the notices in Wood, 
in having a Rector who carried but little respect. Thus, although 
Paul Hood and most of his Fellows had gone with the Visitors 
from the first, and though the College numbered men of such 
distinction as the two Crosses and Thankful Owen amongst its past 
or present Fellows, nothing seems, if we may make any inference 
from the diminished number of matriculations, to have been gained 
by these advantages. 

Pembroke suddenly subsides into obedience after its original 

on Oct. 10, 1638. Thus he first, and Sheldon afterwards (by building the Theatre), 
put a stop to the habitual desecration of St. Mary's Church. 



CXXV111 INTRODUCTION. 

explosion, at the time when it elected Whitewicke in the teeth of 
the Visitors. The large majority of its members submit; and its 
new Master, Langley, one of the seven Presbyterian preachers, fore- 
runners of the Visitation, appears to keep his House in order. 
But Pembroke does not seem at this time to take any prominent 
position. No doubt it had greatly suffered in the war, in which its 
members had engaged with more than usual ardour on the King's side. 
It had furnished fifty officers to the King's forces, and only two fresh 
members had been enrolled between the years 1644 and 1650. 
Perhaps it was a military sentiment, begotten of warlike experience, 
which prompted the College to surrender, and to keep faithfully to 
terms, when it felt there was not much left for it to hazard by 
hopeless resistance lo overpowering force. It would hold on till 
better times. Peter Pett, afterwards Fellow of All Souls, one of 
the founders of the Eoyal Society, and a highly-distinguished 
public servant both before and after the Restoration, should be 
mentioned as having received his education at Pembroke during 
the early part of the period under review. 

The Oxford Halls might naturally be expected to find a place in 
this Introduction. They have a history, and a very important 
history, of their own; but beyond the fact that their members are 
all registered as Submitters, and that many of them obtained prefer- 
ment in Colleges, they do not occupy the attention of the Visitors, 
and there is scarcely even a reference to them in the Register. 

Some brief notices of these Halls will be found in a Note (p. 285) ; 
to which it may be added, that, when the City surrendered, they were 
all empty, or nearly so ; no matriculations having taken place during 
the war at most of them, and very few at any. As there was next 
to no Foundation they could not exist without students, and several, 
as we have seen, were let out to " laics " in lodgings. New Inn 
Hall had been taken possession of for the Royal Mint. But as soon 
as ever the war was over the latter Hall and Magdalen Hall seem 
to have experienced a rush of Undergraduates, and these consisted, 
as might have been expected from the previous theological com- 



INTRODUCTION. CXX1X 

plexion of the institutions, exclusively of the now dominant party. 
Hence the absolute unanimity of the submissions to the Visitation 
registered at these Halls in 1648, and the large number of appoint- 
ments to Scholarships in Colleges from amongst the new comers, 
and to Fellowships from such Graduates as enrolled themselves on 
the books of the Halls. But this very circumstance was a dis- 
advantage to the Halls as soon as the Colleges were once more 
settled. Their strength had been drawn off'; and they remained at 
a low ebb during the Commonwealth. After the Restoration they 
rallied again; but, though the same cause which accounts for their 
prosperity during the Laudian period, viz., the predominant and 
exclusive Laudian character of the Colleges, which drove the oppo- 
site party into the Halls, had probably begun to operate once 
more, we do not find their aggregate number of matriculations nearly 
so great as at the earlier date. It may be worth observing that, as 
far as we can judge from the records of Matriculation, they seem to 
have been recruited from exactly the same ranks of society as the 
Colleges. The smaller ones were often used as semi-private places 
of education by those who desired, and could afford to pay for, 
special care and training for their sons. 

The following conspectus of the matriculations at Colleges and 
Halls will throw some light on the general history of all these insti- 
tutions at the three critical periods of the seventeenth century, viz. : 
the Laudian, before the events of 1640 had occurred to diminish the 
flow of matriculations ; the Common wealth, when the Parliamentary 
Visitation had completely triumphed ; and the subsequent period, when 
the Restoration of Church and State had in its turn had time to operate. 

It would be beyond the scope of the present work to attempt to 
form an accurate calculation of the numbers resident at the Univer- 
sity during these periods, or analysis of the different classes of 
society from whence they were derived ; but a good deal of informa- 
tion may be obtained on the latter point from the Tables at the end 
of this book, which are arranged in connection with the several 
Colleges partly for this very purpose. 



cxxx 



INTRODUCTION. 



THE NUMBER OP PERSONS MATRICULATED AT COLLEGES AND 
HALLS; TAKEN FROM THE UNIVERSITY REGISTERS. 

[The years are reckoned from January 1 to December 31, and the order in which 
the Colleges and Halls are entered in the earliest book is retained. The numbers 
in 1849 are appended by way of comparison.] 





Ayerage number of Matriculations 




for the years 


College or Hall. 


1638 


1650 


1663 






and 


and 


and 


1849. 




1639. 


1651. 


1664. 




Christchurch .... 


27 


43 


45 


46 


Magdalen . . . 


17 


19 


13 


2 


New . . . \ ' , : 


4 


12 


7 


5 


All Souls . , *, 


4 


6 


3 


1 


Merton .... 


7 


13 


10 


12 


Corpus .... 


10 


14 


5 


6 


Queen's .... 


23 


33 


26 


28 


St. John's .... 


17 


19 


16 


15 


Trinity .... 


16 


11 


19 


27 


Brasenose .... 


22 


30 


24 


26 


Oriel ..... 


15 


14 


14 


18 


Wadham .... 


11 


85 


31 


26 


Lincoln , . , 


26 


14 


20 


16 


University .... 


10 


8 


10 


21 


Exeter. .... 


41 


36 


43 


43 


Balliol 


26 


22 


12 


26 


Jesus ..... 


23 


15 


23 


17 


Pembroke . . . 


14 


22 


6 


26 


St. Mary Hall . 


6 


6 


4 


11 


Hart Hall 


9 





7 




New Inn Hall. 


24 


8 


9 


1 


Magdalen Hall . , 


40 


30 


21 


27 


Gloucester Hall (Worcester Coll, in 1714) 


12 





5 


33 


St. Alban Hall 


8 





6 





St. Edmund Hall 


5 





19 


7 


Total . 


417 


410 


398 


440 



INTRODUCTION. CXXX1 

It will thus be seen that the average of the matriculations varied 
but little at the three periods; and it may be remarked that the 
number then attained * was not afterwards exceeded till within the 
last few years. As to the numerical strength of the University, 
allowing for a considerably longer period of average residence than 
at present, and remembering that the resident staff was much 
stronger in those days than now, we shall be pretty near the 
mark in assigning 2,500 as about the number of the resident 
Graduates and Undergraduates of the University during the period 
of which the Visitors' Register treats. The servants and "privileged 
persons" would make a considerable addition. M. Sorbieres, on 
his visit b to Oxford, soon after the Restoration, was informed that 
there were three or four thousand "students." The real number 
must have been below the first of these figures. 

a Still less the number attained under Conant's Vice-chancellorship in 1668, 
when there were 460 matriculations. In the early part of the present century the 
average number of matriculations was considerably below 300. In 1835 the number 
had reached 369; in 1849, 440; in 1858 it fell to 399. In 1869 it had reached 583, 
and in 1877, 769. In 1879 it was 798. The numbers at each College and Hall in 
1849 have been selected for the Tabular Statement as showing their normal con- 
dition in modern times before the changes effected by the Royal Commission of 17 
and 18 Viet, came into operation, and before any general enlargement of Colleges 
had taken place. 

b A few notes of this visit may be interesting. M. Sorbieres was a distinguished 
man of science, and brought the best introductions from Paris. He visited all 
the professors, but found them, like the English generally, taciturn. Nor were even 
Drs. Wallis and Willis, whom he reckoned as the most celebrated, any exception. 
He obtained more information from the courteous Mr. Lockey, Bodley's Librarian, 
who lived in Christchurch. This, he was told, "is one of the greatest and richest 
Colleges, for it has an income of 70,000 livres. There are seventeen or eighteen Col- 
leges which are nearly all on a similar scale. The quadrangle of Christchurch is 
scarcely less than that enclosed within the barriers of the Place Royale. There is 
one College where I saw a great bronze nose over the gate, as if it were a Pol- 
chinello's mask. They told me it was also called the College of the Nose, and that 
the nose over the gate was a likeness of that of John Duns Scotus, who had taught 
there. The last I visited was St. John's, which is the most regularly built, though 
not the richest." He then describes the quadrangle of St. John's, which, he says, 
is as large as that of the Louvre, the library, the gallery, and the picture of Charles 
the First upon ivory, made of lines of minute writing, comprising the whole of the 



CXXX11 INTRODUCTION. 

In concluding the above slight and rapid survey of the different 
Colleges and Halls it is interesting to observe at this distance of time 
the changes and chances which have befallen them. If it cannot 
by any means be said that the last are now first, and the first last, 
it is certainly true that they have attained in the course of ages a 
more equable relative position than of old. Modern benefactors 
have arisen whose noble pride it has been to raise a College or Hall 
out of obscurity, or some more than ordinary Head of a House has 
conferred a reputation which has attracted, as at Exeter during the 
seventeeth century, numbers, affection, and a public spirit far 
more effective in elevating an institution than mere wealth. But, 
making all allowance for the necessary changes produced by the 
lapse of ages, and by the development of the national character 
reacting on its central places of " religion, learning, and education,"* 
the real wonder is that so much should have remained unchanged, 
and that Oxford in the seventeenth century should after all be 
so exceedingly like Oxford in the nineteenth. Happily for the Royal 
Commissioners, who now-a-days from time to time take the place 
of the Parliamentary Visitors, they have no longer to use military 
force in obtaining obedience to their Ordinances; but, if some 
critical observers are to be believed, it may be a question whether 
experience has not proved that there is much the same variety as 
ever in the way in which different Colleges have carried out the 
reforms imposed upon them. 

Finally, in judging of the success of the Visitors in dealing with 
these separate institutions, as distinguished from the general effects 

Psalms in Latin. He then visited the Bodleian, which he greatly admired, and where 
he saw the sword presented by the Pope to Henry the Eighth. He concludes that 
" Oxford would not be what it is except for the Colleges; for there are no more 
inhabitants than are required to supply the wants of three or four thousand students, 
and to cultivate a very pleasant plain in which the city is situated, upon a little river, 
extremely full of fish, which falls near this into the Thames." (Relation d'nn 
voyage en Angleterre, par M. Sorbieres, Cologne, 1666.) The attention of the writer 
was directed to this curious book by T. H. Ward, M.A., Tutor of Brasenose. 
a The phrase used in the " Abolition of Tests Act." 



INTRODUCTION. . CXXXlll 

of the Visitation upon the whole University, it is true that we find 
some conspicuous instances of failure which tell against it; but 
certainly not more than might have been expected, nor indeed 
nearly so many. We must at least admit that no other Visitation 
or Commission during the whole long and eventful history of 
Oxford University ever had such a task to accomplish. Perhaps it 
is not too much to say that none, if we consider the circumstances 
of the times, ever did the work entrusted to them better. 



CAMD. SOC. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PREFACE - 

INTRODUCTION : 

Chap. I. Antecedent Oxford history - 

Chap. II. The general character of the Visitation 

Chap. III. The University on its defence 

Chap. IV. The Visitors at work 

Chap. V. The state of Oxford Colleges 

THE VISITORS' REGISTER: 

Orders, &c., by the First Board of Visitors 
Orders, &c., by the Second Board of Visitors - 
Orders, &c., by the Third Board of Visitors 



PAGK 
v. 



XI. 
XXX. 

Iv. 

- Ixxvii. 

- cviii. 



1 
356 

400 



INDEX FIRST PART: 

Catalogue of Orders, &c. - - 441 

Explanatory Preface to the Index of Names of Members 

of Colleges and Halls - - 465 

Names of Members of Colleges and Halls (the Histo- 
rical Index) - 473 

General Summary of Expulsions and Submissions - 571 

INDEX SECOND PART: 

A. Summary of the Historical Index - 572 

B. Names mentioned in the Register, but not in imme- 
diate connection with any College or Hall - - 583 
C. Names mentioned in the Introduction and Notes, but 
not in the Register - - 586 

CORRIGENDA et ADDENDA ----- 588 



THE EEGISTEK 

OF THE 

VISITOES OF OXFORD UNIVERSITY. 



A Warrant for Bookes and Writings. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie authorized thereunto by TO the severall 
severall ordinances of Parliament and a speciall Comission under Heads of 
the great Seal of England to reforme and regulate the aforesaid University of 
Universitie doe require you to send unto us the said Visitors, sitting 
in Merton College, all the Statutes, Registers, Journalls, Bookes of 
Entries, Accompts, Orders, and other writings which concerne the 
government or affayres of your Colledge. 

As you will answere the contrary. 

To Dr. Fell a for his personall Appearance. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie, &c. doc require you to A Warrant, 
make your personall appearance before us the said Visitors, sitting 
in the Warden's Lodgings of Merton Colledge, to undergoe this 
present visitation, and to answere what shall be propounded. As you 
will answere the contrary. 

To Dr. Fell for the imediate delivery of the Universitie 
bookes taken out of the proper custody of the Register of 
the aforesaid Universitie. 

Wee the Visitors &c. doe require you to send unto us the sayd A Warrant. 
Visitors all the Bookes, Acts of Convocation, with other writings 

8 Samuel Fell, D.D., aged 63 in 1647. Margaret Professor of Divinity in 1626, 
" he being then a Calvinist. At length, leaving his opinion, became, after great 
seekings and cringings, a creature of Dr. Laud, AbP. of Cant?, by whose means he 
was made . . . Dean of Ch. Ch. in 1638." (Ath. Ox. iii. 243.) See Introduction for 
Fell's determined resistance to the Visitors. Few men were more respected by the 
Royalists. 

CAMD. SOC. B 



2 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. 30, 1647. belonging the Universitie (and which were in the keeping and 
custody of the Universitie Kegister till such time you required them 
of him after he was commanded to bring them unto us the aforesaid 
Visitors) immediately l)y this our Mandatorie Jo. Langley. As 
you will answear the contrary. 



A letter to Mr. Button , a Sept. the 30 th , 1647. 

S r . Wee are by a speciall Comission under the great Seal of 
England authorized and required to nominate some to enquire into 
the behaviour of all Governours, Professors, Officers, and Members 
of this Universitie ; And therefore wee reposing great confidence in 
your prudence, fidelitie, and circumspection have nominated you to 
be one of that grand inquest, and desire you to repair to the 
Colledge as soon as conveniently you can to attend this service, 
which is of soe great importance, and requires a very speedy 
dispatch : S r ., we doubt not but that you will address yourself to the 
business to the great content and satisfaction of 

your Loving Freindes 

S r . NATH : BRENT^ W m . TYPPING. 

CHRISTOPHER KOGERS. C HEN. WILKINSON/ 

Dr. WlLKINSON. d FRANCIS CHETNELL. g 

JOHN WiLKiNSON. 6 

R Ralph Button, M. A., of Merton College, " a good scholar, but a rigid Preshyterian." 
(Ath. Ox. iii. 381.) " A good Tutor." (Ib. iii. 959.) " A noted Tutor." (Fasti, ii. 158.) 
He was from the first regarded as the most likely man to be useful to the Visitors, 
and soon became Public Orator, Canon of Christ Church, and Proctor. He had been, 
when at Exeter College, one of Prideaux's favourite pnpils.^Ejected at the Restora- 
tion, he lived a Nonconformist~preacher, r and"died 1680. 

b For Sir Nathaniel Brent, see Introduction. 

Christopher Rogers, D.D., originally of Magdalen Hall, made Canon of Christ 
Church, in Gardiner's place, 1647; but not established'there till 1649. He had been 
Principal of New Inn Hall; "a person of most reverend aspect, yet of no parts, .... 
. an easy man, and apt to be guided by the persuasion of others." (Fasti, ii. 118.) 

[For notes d , e , f , , see next page.J 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 3 

The names of divers worthy Gentlemen who are appoynted Sept. 30, 1648. 
delegates to the Visitors, Sept. 30, 1647, being Members of the 
severall Colleges and Halls in the Universitie of Oxon : viz*. 

In Merton Colledge : Mr. Copley, Mr. Button, Dr. Whistler, Mr. 

Martyn. 

Christ Church: . . Mr. Godfrey, Mr. Fettiplace. 
Lincolne Coll: . . Mr. Cross Jun r , h Mr. Owen, Mr. Perkes. 
Exeter Coll: . . Mr. Conant, 1 Mr. Clifford, Mr. Martin, Mr. 

Hancocke. 

d John Wilkinson, D.D. Fellow of Magdalen College, and Tutor to Prince Henry. 
(Fasti, i. 316). Principal of Magdalen Hall, 1613, President of Magdalen College, 
1648. " A person more of beard than learning." (Annals, 1648.) 

6 John Wilkinson, of Magdalen Hall, M.D. brother of Henry Wilkinson, Junior, 
and nephew of Dr. John Wilkinson. This " John, the physician, was no writer." 
(Fasti ii. 156.) 

f Henry Wilkinson, D.D. Senior, nicknamed " Long Harry." He was a " noted 
Tutor" of Magdalen Hall before the Great Rebellion. An enthusiastic Parliamentarian, 
one of the seven Presbyterian preachers of 1646, Visitor 1647, Fellow of Magdalen 
College, Canon of Ch. Ch., and Margaret Professor of Divinity in succession to 
Cheynell. " A good scholar, always a close student, an excellent preacher." (Ath. 
Ox. iii. 438.) " A violent and impetuous Presbyterian." (Fasti, ii. 118.) This 
Henry Wilkinson and Cheynell were punished for preaching against the " Declara- 
tion " of Charles I. prefixed, in 1628, to the Thirty-nine Articles. (Annals, 1648.) 

& Francis Cheynell, D.D. of Merton College, well known through Dr. Johnson's Bio- 
graphy. (Lives of the Poets and Eminent Men.) During the war he showed so much 
courage and conduct that the colonels obeyed him as if he were a general. His violent 
kindness to Chillingworth is historical. He occupies a most important place in the 
Visitation as one of the seven preachers of 1646, Visitor 1647, Margaret Professor 
of Divinity and President of St. John's 1648. But " he declined the Engagement, and 
was superseded in all his offices." (Calamy.) " A violent, impetuous Presbyterian." 
(Fasti, ii. 118.) " He was accounted by many, especially those of his party (who had 
him always in great veneration), a good disputant and preacher .... troubled with 
a weakness in his head which some in his time called craziness." (Ath. Ox. iii. 704.) 
Cheynell died 1665. 

h Robert Cross, or Crosse, M.A. of Lincoln College, " a great tutor and Aristotelian, 
and much noted in the University for a learned man." He refused the Regius Pro- 
fessorship of Divinity in 1648, conformed at the Restoration, and died 1683. Wood 
also says he was " a noted philosopher and divine, an able preacher, and well versed 
in the fathers and schoolmen." (Ath. Ox. iv. 122.) 

For Conant, see Introduction. As he resigned his Fellowship at Exeter College 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 

Sept. 30, 1647. Trinitie Coll: . . Mr. Unet, Mr. Weildey. 

Corpus X tj : . . . Mr. Sparkes, Mr. Hillersden. 

Perab. Coll: . . . Mr. Langley. a Mr. Brewen. 

Baliol Coll: . . . Mr. Good Sen r Mr. Bradshaw, b Mr. Balmcr. 

St. John's Coll: . . Mr. Webb, Mr. Lownes, Mr. King. 

New Coll: . . . Mr. Townesend, Mr. Allanson. 

Magdalene Coll: . . Mr. Stevens, Mr. King. 

Queenes Coll: . . Mr. Sanderson, Mr. Haughton. 

Whaddam Coll: . . Mr. Sydenham. 

Gloucester Hall: . Mr. Principal Garbrand. 

New Inn Hall: . . Mr. Whitehorne, Mr. North, Mr. Buddy. 

Magdalene Hall: . Mr. Lee, Mr. Stringer, Mr. Brace. 

Edniond Hall: . . Mr. Gorges. 

Jesus Coll: . . . Mr. Adams, Vice- Principal. 

Mr. Cornish. 

Mr. Blagrave. d 

(P. 3.) At the Meeting of the Visitors, Octob. the I st , 1647. 

Ord. Ordered that Mr. Cheynell, one of our company, be desired to 

Oct. the l 8 *, a tt; en( j the Hon ble Commissioners appoynted by the Parliament to 

resolve all doubts which are or shall be made about the meaning of 

all or any Articles that were agreed on for the Surrender of Oxford; 

on September 27, 1647, rather than accept the Visitation, and as his biographer 
(Life, p. 9) asserts that he never once saw Oxford between 1642 and 1649, it would 
seem that he was appointed without his consent. 

a Henry Langley, D.D. formerly Fellow of Pembroke, was soon afterwards appointed 
by the Visitors Master of Pembroke, vice Thomas Clayton deceased; one of the 
seven preachers of 1646. Ejected at the Eestoration, he lived a Nonconformist 
minister, and died at his native place, Abingdon, in 1679. 

b George Bradshaw, M.A. appointed July 21, 1648, by the Visitors Master of 
Balliol, vice Lawrence. 

c Henry Cornish, D.D. of New Inn Hall, one of the seven preachers of 1646. He 
was placed in "Wall's canonry of Christ Church, and, on Wall's submission, in Sander- 
son's. He was ejected at the Restoration, lived a Nonconformist minister, and 
died at Oxford in 1698. 

d John Blagrave was made by Ordinance of Parliament, on April 12, 1648, 
Squire Bedell for Divinity, and John Langley for Arts and Physic. 



THE VISITORS 5 REGISTER. 5 

and propound five Queries allowed by us to the said Commissioners. Oct. l, 1647. 
That we may proceed in the Keformation and Kegulation of this 
Universitie without offence. 

An Order granting time to the severall Heades of Houses for ?^' 6 th 
bringing in all the Statutes, Bookes, and writings of their 1647. 
Colledges according to former Warrants. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie doe require you to convene 
all such Members of your Houses, whose consent is required for the 
delivery of the bookes demanded in our Warrant sent unto you, and 
to returne the sayd bookes within such a time, or upon default to 
appear in person and bring an account in writing why the sayd 
bookes cannot be brought unto us. 

Prorogatio Termini Michaelis ex Mandate Visitatorum; 
7o Oct., 1647. 

Nos Visitatores hujus Academies Oxoniensis authoritate diver- 
sarum Ordinationum Supremae Curias Parliament! et Comissionis 
sub magno Sigillo Anglias ad visitandum et reformandum Univer- Oct. 7. 
sitatem predictam legetime et sufficienter in hac parte fulciti magnis 
et gravissimis causis publicam utilitatem hujus loci concernentibus 
moti terminum proxime sequentem vulgo vocatum terminum 
Michaelis ordinarie incaepturum crastino Dionysii, scilicet decimo 
die Octobris difFerendum duximus usque ad decimum quintum diem 
mensis Novembris proximae sequentis, et ad omnem et omnimodum 
Juris effectum exinde quovismodo sequi valentem sic difFerimus per 
presentes. 

An Order to all the Members of Pembroke College for their (p. 4.) 

personall appearance in their Colledge Hall. 

Wee the Visitors &c. doe require you and every of you to appear Oct: the 8 lh , 
in your Colledge Hall to morrow morning, between the houres of 
7 and 8, to hear our Order read concerning the Maistership of your 
Colledge. As you will answere the contrary. 



6 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Oct. 8, 1647. An Order for the Establishing Mr. Langley Maister of 

Pembroke Colledge. a 

Wee the Visitors authorized by severall Ordinances of Parliament 
and a speciall Commission under the great Scale of England for 
regulation and reformation of this Universitie of Oxon, Haveing 
this day taken into serious consideration the business between Mr. 
Hen : Langly and Mr. Hen : Whitwicke concerning the Maistership 
of Pembroke Colledge in the said Universitie, doe find that the sayd 
Mr. Langly by Ordinance of Parliament dated the 26 th of August, 
1647 was ordained Maister of the sayd Colledge and that the pre- 
tended election of the sayd Mr. Whitwicke was made after severall 
Inhibitions from the Parliament duely executed to the contrary. 
Wee therefor after a full and serious consideracion had of the pre- 
mises, doe hereby declare that the pretended election of Mr. Whit- 
wicke being un duely made as aforesayd is voyd, and that the sayd 
Mr. Whitwicke is no Maister of the sayd Colledge ; And that Mr. 
Langley is rightly constituted and appoynted Maister of the same 
Colledge according to the sayd Ordinance. In pursuance whereof 
Wee doe by these presents require the Fellowes, Schollers, Com- 
moners, and all Officers and Servants belonging to the sayd Colledge 
to give full obedience and conformitie to the sayd Mr. Langley as 

a Pembroke was the first of three Colleges in which the Fellows on a vacancy 
elected a head in the teeth of the Visitors' order to submit to one of their own 
appointment. The others were New College and Brasenose. Henry Wightwick (or 
Whitewick) submitted on October 2nd, 1648, and had his dues as Fellow restored to 
him by the Visitors on February 19, 1649-50. At the Restoration he was " restored " 
to the Mastership. Several other members of the foundation bearing the same 
names are mentioned in the Register. They no doubt belonged to the family of 
Richard Wightwick, B.D. of Balliol, the co-founder of the College in 1624. " The 
mayor, bailiffs, and burghers of Abendon being appointed the chief persons to 
execute Mr. Tesdale's will .... made the Hall of Broadgates into a College; which 
foundation, that they might the better strengthen it, and make it there immovable, 
they made the Earl of Pembroke, then Chancellor of the University, the godfather 
of it, and King James the founder, but at the cost and charges of Mr. Tesdale and 
Wightwick, allowing them only the privilege of foster-fathers." (Wood's Colleges 
and Halls, iii. 619.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 7 

Maister of the sayd Colledge according to the severall Statutes and Oct 8> 1647t 
Customes. As they will answere the contrary. 

An Order divesting Dr. Fell from being Vice-Chancellor. 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, &c., finding that Dr. Fell, Oct. theviii. 
Dean of Christ Church, exercising the place and authoritie of Vice- 
Chancellor of the sayd Universitie, was not lawfully elected there- 
unto ; a For that and other just causes doe declare him not to be 
Vice-Chancellor, and therefore doe hereby discharge him of that 
office, and inhibite him to doe henceforward any act or acts in 
execution of the same: And the Pro- Vice-Chancellors, Doctors, 
Proctors, Heades of Houses, and all other officers and members of 
the sayd Universitie are hereby required to take notice thereof and 
inhibited to act or doe anything in relation to the sayd office, or in 
obedience to his commands as Vice-Chancellor. As they will answere 
the contrary . b 

A positive Warrant to Dr. Fell. 

Wee, the Visitors, &c., doe hereby require you forthwith, upon 
sight hereof, to bring or send to us, at the Warden's Lodgings of 
Merton Colledge, by our mandatorie John Langley, the bookes of 
Statutes, Keyes, Scales, all the Insignia belonging to the office of 
Chancellor and Vice- Chancellor, and all other writeings, goodes, and 
publique instruments of the sayd Universitie remaining in your 
handes. As you will answere the contrary. 



a Dr. Fell's position as Vice-Chancellor was a very disputable one, even from the 
point of view of his party; for it was not only that he had not been nominated by 
the Chancellor, the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, but he had not been nomi- 
nated at all the previous year, the Marquis of Hertford, Chancellor, having left 
Oxford at the Surrender. (Fasti.) 

This order was " set up on the school gate." (Annals.) 

Publicly stuck up." "But nobody obeyed, or took notice of that order." 
(Annals.) 



8 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Oct. 9, 1647. An Order for seizing upon the Universitie Books in the 

Register's Chamber. 

Oct. the 9 th . It is ordered by the Hon ble Visitors that S r Nath. Brent. S r W m . 
1647 

Cobb, Mr. Beck, and Mr. Mills, with their Register and Manda- 

torie, shall goe and seiz upon all the bookes pertaining the govern- 
ment of this Universitie, now in the handes and custody of Mr. 
French, register of the sayd Universitie, in his Chamber in Merton 
Colledge, whereby they may better proceed in their present visita- 
cion. a 

Oct. the 11 th . An Order giveing power to Report the proceedings of the 

Visitors, and to attend the Committee of Lords and 
Commons. 

It is ordered by the Hon ble Visitors that Sir Nath. Brent and Mr. 
Hen: Wilkinson should be desired by this Board to attend, at 
London, the Hon ble Committee of Lords and Commons (appoynted 
(P. 6) ky Ordinance of Parliament for that purpose), to give them a full 
account of our proceedings in this Visitacion ; and also it is ordered 
that the Register doe attend the sayd business with our severall acts 
and papers need full thereunto. Be it alsoe further desired that the 
aforesayd visitors doe acquaint the Earle of Pembroke, Chancellor 
of the Universitie of Oxon with that perticuler business concerning 
the dischargeing Doctor Fell of being Vice-Chancellor (and with 
all other our proceedings), and to desire his Lordshipp to take into 
consideracion the speedie supply of that office. 

* Wood gives a graphic account of the proceedings of these four commissioners, 
and of the efforts made by John French, the " Register," to evade the demand for 
the register of the University. But having brought the book to his room at Mertou, 
of which college he was a Fellow, and where the Visitors sat, in order to copy, at 
Dr. Fell's request, the names of the " delegates" recently appointed by the University 
to " make answer to the Visitors," his room was entered and the book abstracted. As 
he was one who "submitted" to the Visitation perhaps the resistance was not so 
obstinate as it might have been. He seems afterwards to have recanted his sub- 
mission, as he was one of those expelled for " malignancy" and other delinquencies. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 9 

[Here the Orders commence afresh, the Visitor's having received March 17, 
fresh powers.] 1047-8. 

a A Declaration to the Observers of the Articles for 
Surrender of Oxon. 

Whereas there is and hath been great care taken for the observa- March the 17, 
tion of the Articles agreed on for the Surrender of Oxon, and some [1647-8]. 
whoe were not present at the Surrender expect benefit by them, and 
divers whoe were present presume to violate them: Wee, the 
Visitors of this Universitie of Oxford, doe hereby declare that we 
shall use the utmost of our power to procure what favour we cann 
for all such as observe the sayd Articles, and doe thereby render 
themselves capable of the rights and priveledges granted to them by 
the Articles aforesaid. 

A Citacion omnibus viis et modis to cite those whoe have 
not appeared upon former Warrants. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, authorised there- March the 17 th 
unto by severall Ordinances of Parliament and , speciall Com- 
mission, &c. : haveing personally sought you by our officer, whoe 
could not find you, doe now cite you omnibus viis et modis to make 
your personall appearance before us in the Warden's Lodgings of 
Merton Colledge upon Tuesday next, being the 21st of this instant 
March, between the houres of two and three in the afternoon, to 
undergoe this present Visitation, and to answere such questions as 
shall then and there be propounded to you. As you will answear 
the contrarye. 

a Some remarks on the interval which had elapsed between the Order of October 
11, 1647, and that of March 17, 164 , will be found in the Introduction. A good 
deal is said by Wood and Walker on the illegality of the Visitors' proceedings in 
resuming the Visitation after so long an intermission, as if it had not altogether 
come to an end in point of law by their failure to adjourn de die in diem; but a 
fair review of all the circumstances will deprive this objection of any considerable 
weight. 

CAMD. 8OC. C 



10 THE VISITORS REGISTEE. 

March the 17, An Order to Dr. Fell, or such as have the possession of the 

Deane's Lodgings of X* Church, for his and their imme- 
diate removeing out of the sayd lodgings. 

(P. 7.) Whereas Dr. Fell was by order of the Hon ble Committee of Lords 

and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon upon the 
28th of December, 1647, adjudged guilty of high contempt and 
denyall of authoritie of Parliament for visiting the sayd Universitie, 
and required to remove from his place of Deanary and Lodgings of 
Christ Church, which sentence of the Hon bie Committee hath been 
since confirmed by both Houses of Parliament : These are to require 
all such as have the possession of the Deane's Lodgings of X 1 Church 
forthwith to remove from the same. As they will Answear the contrary. 

An Order to Dr. Gardiner a and Dr. Iles b (for their removall 

out of their Lodgings) as Prebendary s of X* Church. 

March the 17 th . Whereas , Prebendary of X* Church, was by order of, 

&c., adjudged guilty of high contempt, &c., and required forthwith 
to remove from the lodgings which he holds at X r Church : These 
are to require you, upon sight hereof, to remove forthwith from 
those Lodgings which you have and doe enjoy as Prebendary of 
the sayd Colledge, and this we injoyne you. As you will Answere 
the contrary. 

The same to Dr. Oliver, Dr. Potter/ and Dr. Bayley. 6 

n Eichard Gardiner, D.D. " a quaint preacher and orator," author of many sermons. 
He lived obscurely in Oxford after his expulsion in 1648, was restored 1660. and died 
1670. He was a benefactor to Christ Church, and amongst other things gave the 
fountain or " aqueduct" in the large quadrangle. 

b Thomas lies, D.D. 1619. 

c John Oliver, D.D.; restored 1660 ; died 1661. He had been chaplain to Laud. 
For some account of this " learned, meek, and pious person,' 5 see Kennet's Eegister, 
p. 552, and Dr. Bloxam's Eegister of Magdalen. 

d Hannibal Potter, D.D. 1630; President of Trinity, 1643; ejected, 1648; restored, 
1660; died, 1664. 

e Eichard Baylie,D.D., Chaplain to Charles I. and to Land; President, 1632; D.D. 
1663 ; Dean of Sarum, 1635; Vice-Chancellor, 1630 and 1637; ejected from St. John's 
1648 ; restored, 1660; died, 1667. " A great sufferer for the King's cause." Ath. Ox. 
iv. 822. 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



11 



Whereas, [by order] &c., for visiteing the said Universitie, and 
required forthwith to remove from the Lodgings belonging to the 
President of the Colledge aforesayd: These are to require you, 
upon sight hereof, to give your obedience, and to remove forth- 
with according to the sayd order. As you will Answere the con- 
trary. 

Dr. Ratcliff a desireing that he might have longer time granted 
him because he is not well 

Resolved upon question : 

That we have no power to dispense with Dr. RatclifTe, because 
he was required in January last to give up his Principality and 
Lodgings forthwith upon the sight of the order ; and if Dr. Ratcliff 
shall, in obedience to the order of the Hon ble Committee of Lords 
and Commons for the Reformation of Oxford, give up his place and 
renounce all right in his Lodgings as Principall, wee shall move 
Mr. Greenwood b to shew what favour he may to the sayd doctor 
without prejudice to himself. 

Four Questions propounded by Order to Doctor Pitt, c 
Warden of Wadham Coll: 

1. Whether he did approve the Universitie Reasons/ passed in 
Convocation June the first, 1647? 

2. Whether he approve the Answear of the Universitie Delegates, 11 
presented to the Visitors in the name of the Universitie, October 
the 8th, 1647? 

3. Whether he be willing to undergoe this Visitacion by the 
Commissioners, authorized thereunto by the immediate power of 
Parliament? 

a Samuel Ratcliffe, D.D., originally a " Puritanical" tutor of B.N.C. (Fasti, i. 347). 
Principal, 1614; DD. 1615; ejected, 1647; died, 1648. 
b For Daniel Greenwood, D.D., the new Principal, see Introduction. 
John Pitt, D.D., Warden, 1644; D.D. 1645; ejected, 1648; died, 1648. 
d See Introduction. 



March 17, 
1647-8. 



March the 
21 8t . 



(P. 8.) 



March the 

21 st . 



12 THE VISITORS' REGISTER 



' 4< ^ nat Orders have been made by the Delegates aforesaid at 
any of their meetings since the first of June, 1647. 

A Copy of a Letter from my Lord of Pembroke, Chancellor of 
this Universitie of Oxford, to the Visitors of the sayd 
Universitie. 

GENTLEMEN, 

I returne my unfeigned respects to you the Visitors, the Senior 

Doctor, the Heades of Houses and Prebendary es of X* Church, 

elected by Authority of Parliament, and to all the Delegates that 

are assistant to you in the great worke recomended to your care. 

I am ready to performe the office of a Chancellor, and being further 

intrusted by a Speciall Order of the House of Peers, am resolved by 

Gods blessing to be present upon the place that I may serve the 

Universitie and Kingdome by promoteing that Reformation which 

the Parliament intends to make in Oxford. I believe that the 

Doctors whoe did lately exercise the Pro- Vice-Chancellor's office, 

their Proctors and their Delegates, chosen in Convocation, June the 

first, can give you an account of all matters that have been late 

transacted. I doe therefore desire you convent them all, and to 

require them in my name to deliver up the Great Seal of my office, 

the Scale Manuall, all the Insignia of the Vice-Chancellor and 

(P. 9.) Proctours, together with all the keyes, bookes, writeings, and all 

other thinges whatsoever that are comitted to the care and trust, or 

are for the ornament and honor of the Vice- Chancellor and Proc- 

tours, especially the Beadles' staves into your hands. And in case 

they refuse that their names be returned to 

Your loveinge freind and Chancellor, 

PEMBROKE. 

Ramsbury, 20th March, 1647. 



March the 
21 th 1647. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 13 

March 21, 
[By the Visitors.] 1647 ' 8 - 

Articles put by way of Question to Mr. Tozer, a Sub-rector 
of Exeter Coll. 

You are required to declare, 

1. What Leases have been let by you the Sub-Rector and other 
Fellowes of Exeter Colledge since the Surrender of Oxon. 

2. Whoe and how many have been admitted Scholars or Fellowes 
of Exeter Coll. since the begining of this Visitacion. 

3. Whether you have not set up the Common Prayer-Booke in 
Exeter Coll. since the use of it was prohibited, and you yourselfe 
had for a while layd it aside. 

4. Whether you did not check and revile Mr. Jo. Mathewes of 
Exeter Coll. for not comeing to Common Prayr. 

5. Why you permit Mr. Polewheele, a schandalous person and 
a man of blood, to enjoy the profitts of his place at Exeter Coll. 

6. Why doe you connive at the notorious miscarriages of Teige, 
your Servitor. 

7. Why Tho. Voisey, Commoner, was expelled your House. 

8. Why you did not censure Mr. Bury, Fellow of your House, 
for a scandalous and daingerous Libell delivered by way of oracion 
in your hearing. 

9. Why you discouraged Braine, an ingenious youth of a tender 
conscience, when he expressed his zeale against supersticion. 

10. Why you did not punish Bridgood and others for drinkeing 
of healths to the confusion of Reformers. 

1 1 . Why you contemned the Order of the Visitors for prorouging (P. 10.) 
of the terme, and permitted ingenious youthes to be sconced for 
observeing the Order aforesayd. 

12. What summ of monies, for what, and by whome, there hath 



For Henry Tozer see Introduction. 



14 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

March 21, been at any time expended by order of the delegates since June, 

1647-8. 



March the ^ further Order for Dr. Fell's Removeall from his Deanry and 

Lodgings of X* Church. 

Whereas the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament have 
declared and adjudged the Deanry of X fc Church Colledge in Oxon 
to be void of Dr. Samuell Fell, late Deane of X 1 Church aforesayd, 
and have by an Ordinance bearing date the second of March, 1647, 
amoved the sayd Dr. Samuel Fell from the Deanry aforesayd, the 
Lodgings and the profitts thereof: Wee the Visitors of the Uni- 
versitie of Oxon, authorized by severall Ordinances of Parliament 
and a speciall Commission under the greate Seale of England for 
regulateing and reforming the Universitie aforesaid, considering 
that the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled have ordained 
Mr. Edward Reynolds b to be Deane of X* Church and Vice-Chan- 
cellor of the sayd Universitie, and that the Ordinances aforesayd 
cannot be put in execution nor any Government setled in the 
Universitie untill the family and goods of Dr. Fell aforesayd be 
removed ; doe by these presents require all that have the oversight 
or possession of the Lodgings or custody of the Goods of Dr. Fell 
in X* Church forthwith upon sight hereof to remove, that Mr. 

8 To these questions Tozer replied, on March 27, by what the Visitors voted a 
" frivolous answer," and for which they condemned Tn'tn as " guilty of high contempt." 
(Annals.) On that same day Dr. Sheldon, Warden of All Souls, and Dr. Ham- 
mond, Canon of Christ Church and Public Orator, being required to acknowledge 
the authority of the Visitors, gave similar answers; for which, on March 30, they 
were voted out of their offices, Palmer and Corbet being substituted at All Souls 
and Christ Church respectively. Corbet was one of the Visitors. John Mills, 
another of the Visitors, was placed in Dr. John Payne's Prebend (or Canonry) 
of Christ Church, and Henry Cornish in that of Dr. Wall. The celebrated Dr. 
Edward Pocock was, by Selden's interest, now made Canon of Christchurch, and 
Professor of Hebrew, a vacancy having occurred. He did not hold his chair" long, 
as in 1649 he declined to take the " Engagement." (-?5.) 

b For Reynolds, see Introduction. In the Order of the Lords and Commons, dated 
Feb. 18, 1647, and published in Convocation on April 12, 1648, Reynolds is only ap- 
pointed Vice-Chancellor till August, 1649. Reg. Convoc. T. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



15 



Keynolds may presently take possession of the Lodgings aforesaid, 
and execute the place and office both of Deane of X s Church and 
Vice-Chancellor of the Universitie aforesayd. And according to 
our Commission wee require all Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, and 
other Officers and Ministers whatsoever under the command of the 
Parliament to ayd and assist our Officers in takeing possession of the 
Lodgings aforesaid to the ends and purposes aforesaid. As they will 
Answere the contrary. 

A Suspention of Mr. Webberley from the Sub-rectorship of 
Lincolne Coll. and protitts of his fellowship for his con- 
tempt of the authentic of Parliament and Visitors in his 
misdemenour. 

Whereas Mr. John Webberley, Sub-rector of Lincolne College, 
in Oxon being con vented before us, did out of an insolent contempt 
of the Immediate Authoritie of Parliament (whereby we are 
authorized to visit, regulate and reforme this Universitie of Oxon 
and all the Colledges and Halls therein) presume to affront and 
abuse us at two severall Sessions, and pleaded that he was to be 
excused for his boldness because he did conceive himself to be a 
leading example to all the rest of the Graduates and Fellowes of 
Houses in the Universitie aforesaid : We the Visitors of the said 
Universitie being compelled by the insolent and uncivill carriage 
of John Webberley aforesayd to make him (what he desired to be) 
a leading example unto others, doe by this present Order suspend 
the said John Webberley from the execucion of his office of Sub- 
rector, and from all the profitts of his Fellowship untill the said 
Mr. Webberley shall give some convincing testimony of his sub- 
mission and reformation. 

A Declaration or Resentment of the Visitors of the abuses 
oifered to the Souldiers of the Garrison of Oxon by the 
Students and Members of the Universitie. 

We the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, observeinge that 



(P. 11.) 

March the 
30 th 1648. 



March the 
30 th 1648. 



16 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



March 30, 
1G43. 



March the 
30 th 1648. 

(P. 12.) 



diverse Graduates and other Members of this Universitie are guilty 
of Noctivagation, Intemperance, Purturbations of the Peace, and 
breach of the Articles in severall respects, especially in offering 
intolerable affronts and abuses to the Souldiers of this garrison, doe 
hereby declare our high resentment of these notorious and inex- 
cusable Crimes, and doe assure all the members of this Universitie 
and all priveledged persons Avhatsoever, that wee are resolved to 
proceed according to the trust reposed in us against all that are or 
shall be guilty of the foremencioned, or the like abuses, according 
to the quality and degree of their demerits. 

A Declaration to incite all such whoe may claime benefit by 
the Articles of Oxon, to come in and bring their severall 
Pleas and pretentious to the Visitors against the 6th of 
Aprill, 1648. 

Whereas diverse Members of this Universitie by studdied delayes 
doe seek advantages, and endeavoure to retard the great worke of 
reformation intended by the Parliament to be made and perfected 
here in Oxon : We the Visitors of the said Universitie (observeing 
that diverse doe plead that they did noe way contribute or assist 
toward the rayseing of an Armie against the Parliament, and that 
they gave noe manner of ayd or assistance to any Armie after it 
was raysed against the Parliament, but by constraint and against 
their will; And considering that others affirme that they tooke up 
Armes noe where else but in Oxford, and here alsoe by express 
command dureing the time that it was a garrison for the defence 
thereof, and doe therefore desire the benefitt of the 16th of those 
Articles agreed on for the Surrender of Oxon :) have thought fitt 
to give all manner of persons (whoe have not refused to submit to 
this present visitacion) time till the 8th of Aprill next ensueing, to 
bring in their severall pleas and pretentions of this or the like 
nature, subscribed with their owne hands, whereby they hope to 
render themselves capable of favour. And we allow or appoint 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



17 



any one Visitor here upon the place to receive those pleas which 
are to be considered by five or more of UP. But if this fayr 
offer be sleighted by such as are now present in the Universitie, 
or may be reasonably conceived to have sufficient notice of it, we 
know not what Apologie to make for them when we shall be called 
upon (how soon we know not) to give in a punctuall account of 
this present Visitacion. And we desire all to take notice, That vaine 
pretences will not be admitted by such as are intrusted to examine a 
business of such consequence and weight. a 

An Order sent to X 1 Church Coll. for citeing all Prebendaries, 
Students, and Members of the sayd Coll. to appear on 
Monday next in the Deane's lodgings. 

We the Visitors of this Universitie, authorized thereunto by 
severall Ordinances of Parliament and a speciall Comission under 
the great Scale of England, to reforme and regulate the aforesayd 
Universitie, Doe require all Governours, Prebendaries, Students, 
and Members of the Colledge of X 1 Church to meet in the Deane's 
lodgings of the said Colledge on Monday morning between the 
houres of nine and eleven, and make their personall appearance 
before us. As they will answere the contrary. 6 

A Warrant givinge power to Jo. Langley, Mandatory, Andrew 
Burrough, Provost Marshall to the Garison of Oxon, and 

a On March 31, Sir Thomas Fairfax ordered Lt.-Colonel Kelsey, commanding in 
Oxford, to " send for some companies of his regiment to Oxon to be aiding and 

assisting the Visitors upon which more soldiers came to Oxford, which 

made the Visitors more bold and peremptory." (Annals.) 

b On the day appointed the Visitors, finding the Dean's lodgings closed against 
them, " sent for Andrew Burrough, Provost Marshal of the Garrison of Oxford, and 
a guard of musqueteers and others, who being come with hammers and sledges, 
break open the said doors, wherein finding Mrs. Fell and her children, said that 
they came in a fair way to her, and desired her to quit her house." But she refusing, 
" the Visitors sat in the lodgings till eleven o'clock expecting that the members would 
appear according to order, but they refusing, except two or three (which were 
informers), they departed to Merton College." (Annals.) 
CAMD. SOC. D 



March 30, 
1648. 



Aprill the 
first, 1648. 



(P. 13). 



(P. 14.) 



Aprill 4"', 
1648. 



18 THE VISITORS* REGISTER. 

April 4, 1648. such as they shall thinke fitt to take with them to breake 

open and serche the lodgings of Do r . Newlin, a President 
of Corpus Christi, for the Bedle Staves, and other Insignia 
of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie doe appoynt and authorize 
Mr. Andrew Burrow, Provost Marshall, John Langley, Mandatory, 
and such other as they shall thinke fitt to take with them, to breake 
open the doores of Do r Newlin, President of Corpus X tl , and to 
search his Chambers, Study, Trunks, and Boxes, for the Bookes, 
Keyes, Scales, "Writings, and all other Insignia belonginge to the 
office of Vice-Chancellor, togeather with the Bedles Staves, and 
whatever els they can finde belonging to the Universitie of Oxon. 
And the Vice- President of the said Colledge and such Fellowes of 
the same as can be readily found, are hereby required to see that 
nothinge be taken from the said lodgings which doth belonge to 
the President of Corpus X u , unlesse it be a Copy of the Statutes 
or Kegister of the said Colledge, or such other Bookes which have 
beene formerly sent for by our Orders. And hereof faile you not. b 

(P. 13, l. 8.) A Generall Citation to all such who clayme a Vote in Convo- 

Aprill 6 4 , 1648. cation, as also to the Pro- Vice-Chancellors, Proctors, and 

cation. T Delegates to appeare before the Visitors in the Convo- 

cation House the 7th of Aprill, 1648. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie, authorized by severall 
Ordinances of Parliament, and a speciall Commission under the 
great Scale of England, to visite, reforme, and regulate the afore- 
said Universitie, Doe require and Cite all Governours, Masters, 
Professors, Fellowes, Graduates that are Members of the Convo- 

a Dr. Eobert Newlin, restored 1660, died 1687, aged 90. (Fasti, i. 516.) 

b The lodgings of Dr. Newlin were broken open on this day, and diligently 

searched, but nothing was found. On the same day Dr. Saunders, Provost of Oriel, 

being required to make his submission, absconded. 



THE VISITOKS' REGISTER. 19 

cation, or challenge a power to vote in Convocation, to make their April 6, 1648. 
personall appearance upon Fryday next in the afternoone betweene 
the houres of two and three, beinge the seaventh of this instant 
Aprill, in the Convocation House, before us the Commissioners of 
Parliament. And in perticuler Wee cite Doctor Potter, late Presi- 
dent of Trinity Colledge, and Doctor Newlin, President of Corpus 
X u Colledge, who did lately excercise the authority of Pro- Vice- 
Chancellors of this Universitie ; And also Mr. Waringe, Student 
of X*: Church, Mr. Hunte, Fellow of Magdalene Colledge, late 
Proctors, and all the Delegates chosen in the pretended Convoca- 
tion upon the first of June last past: to present some reasons or 
scruples, in the name of the Universitie, and to give a punctuall 
accompt of the publique affaires of the University : to appeare in 
their owne persons, and deliver up to us all the Insignia of the 
Vice- Chancellor and Proctors, and likewise the Bedles' staves into 
our hands. And hereof faile you not, as you and every of you will 
Answere the contrary at your perills. a 

a This citation was on April Gth " stuck up on the school doors and other public 
places." On the day and time appointed, April 7th, " the hell rung out for Convo- 
cation, which done, all the Visitors that were then in the town entered into the 
Convocation House, expecting all members before-mentioned to meet them there, 
but finding none but Dr. Hood, Hector of Lincoln College (one that loved to serve 
the times purposely to save himself and his), who had a just vote, and about ten 

masters read several votes and orders for the ejectment of the Vice-Chancellor, 

Pro- Vice-Chancellor, and Proctors, and for the delivery up of the Insignia, &c." 
(Annals.) 

The Visitors having now tried in vain all peaceable methods of obtaining 
obedience, wait for the arrival of the Chancellor, who, on April llth, made a 
solemn entrance into the University, graphically and sarcastically described by 
Wood. He also quotes from the Register of Convocation T an account of the 
proceedings which followed (see Introduction), and the oath which Reynolds 
the new Vice-Chancellor, took in Convocation to " observe the Statutes, Liberties, 
Privileges, and Customs rightly established of this University, in a way sub- 
ordinate to the authority and power of Parliament, as far as you are thereunto 
called by the place and office whereunto you are now admitted." Some honorary 
degrees were then conferred, several of the Visitors and new Heads of Houses 
admitted to degrees, and the new Bedells, who had been created by ordinance of 
Parliament, nominated. The Vice-Chancellor is presented by the Chancellor with 



20 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Wednesday, An Order directed to the Souldiarie of the Garison of Oxon, 

1648. ' to remove Dr. Fell and other Heades of Houses, &c. 

By order of the right Honourable Philipp Earle of Pembrooke, 
Lord Chancellor, and the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxford. 
The souldiers of this Garison are desired by strength to remove the 
family of Dr. Fell, and all other Heads of Houses and Prebendaries 
of X*: Church, together with all their Families that are ordered by 
authoritie of Parliament to remove from their respective places, in 
case that they doe not forthwith upon sight hereof remove ac- 
cordinge to the Ordinance of Parliament, or Order of the Com- 
(P 15 ) nrittec of Lords and Commons for the Reformation of Oxford.* 

Aprill 12, An Order for Committment of Dr. Shelden for refusing to 

submitt to the authority of the Visitors of the Universitie 
of Oxon. 

"Whereas Dr. Gilbert Shelden, late Warden of All-Soules Colledge 
in the University of Oxford, beinge severall tymes summoned to 
appeare before us appoynted Visitors of the said Universitie by 
severall Ordinances of Parliament, and a Commission under the 
great Scale of England, hath contemptuously refused to submit to 
the Authority conferred upon us by the said Ordinances and Com- 
mission, and obstinately denyed to deliver up the Statutes and 
Register Booke, as also the Warden's Lodgings of the said Colledge 
according to the contents of an Order of the Committee of Lords 

a seal of office, but the " goods belonging to the Vice-Chancellor," as well as the 
Bedells' staves of office, were not found for two years. In Sept. 1649, the Colleges 
are ordered to subscribe for new staves in order to remedy this " great dishonour of 
the University." (Annals.) 

a Mrs. Fell, refusing to accept even the orders of the Chancellor, was carried out 
into the quadrangle by soldiers on a chair, and there left with her children. Morley, 
Payne, Hammond, and others conducted her out of the great gates to Carfax. Her 
husband, when released from prison, retired with her to Snnningwell, near Abing- 
don, for the short remainder of his life. He died of the shock produced by hearing 
of the King's " execution." 



THE VISITORS' EEGISTEB. 21 

and Commons for Regulatinge the said Universitie beinge dated April 12, 1648. 

the 30 of March last, for the establishinge of Mr. Jo. Palmer, Bat. 

of Physicke, Warden of the said Colledge, to enjoy and have all 

the power, rights, emoluments, roomes, and lodgings by any Statute, 

Custome, or right belonginge to the Warden thereof: These are 

therefore to will and require you, by vertue of the said Ordinances 

and Commission, to take into your custodie the bodie of the said 

Dr. Gilbert Shelden for his said contempt, and him safely to keepe 

till hee shall be delivered by order of law. Whereof you are not 

to faile as you will answere the contrary: And for your soe doinge 

this shall be your Warrant. 8 

An Order concerninge the severall Members of Magdaline April 13, 

College in Oxon: 

Ordered by the Lord Chancellor and Visitors of this University, 
that noe Fellow, Demy, Scholler, Chaplaine, Clerke, Chorister, 
Officer, Servant, or Member of Magdalane College shall enjoy any 
benefitt of their respective places, or any of them, untill they give 
satisfaction to the Visitors of this University. 13 

a For an account of Sheldon and the proceedings at All Souls see Wood's 
Annals, and " Worthies of All Souls " by the Editor of this Register. 

b The Visitation of Magdalen preceded that of All Souls on the same day, 
April 13th ; and a similar process had taken place there, Dr. John Wilkinson 
having been installed in Dr. Oliver's lodgings. As none of the members of the 
college, except "one Mr. John Dale, Jun." attended the summons, the above Order 
was made out the same evening. Wadham College was visited after All Souls, and 
John Wilkins' name entered in the buttery book as Warden instead of Dr. Pitt's. 
Trinity was taken next in order, and " old Mr. Harris, of Hanwell," one of the 
Visitors, put in possession of Dr. Potter's lodgings. St. John's came next, Dr. 
Baylie being superseded by another Visitor, Francis Cheynell. This gives Wood 
an opportunity for relating an amusing colloquy between Dr. Baylie and Sir 
William Cobb, one of the Visitors, very much to the discomfiture of the latter. 
Lastly took place the Visitation of Brasenose, when Dr. Eadcliffe was superseded 
by Daniel Greenwood. 

On April 14, as the " Scholars of Chribtchurch " had torn out of the buttery-book 
the recent entry of the names of the new Dean and Canons, the Visitors proceeded 
thither once more and reentered them. The Chancellor, satisfied with the vigorous 
proceedings of the three days he had spent at Oxford, now left for London. 



22 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 15, 1648. An Inhibition concerninge the use of Common Prayer in the 
severall Colledges and Halls within the University of 
Oxon: 

Wee the Visitors of the University of Oxon: authorised by 
severall Ordinances of Parliament and a spetiale Commission under 
the great Scale of England, to reforme and regulate the aforesaid 
(P. 16.) University, Takinge into seriouse consideratione the great abuse 
and disobedience of authority of Parliament by the publique use of 
common Prayer, in the Chappells of the severall Colledges and 
Halls in this Universitie, notwithstanding an ordinance of Parlia- 
ment to the contrary: As also the great slacknesse in settinge up, 
" and puttinge in execution the Directory accordinge to the said 
Ordinance, in their severall Chappells aforesaid : These are there- 
fore to will and require all Governours, Masters, Heads of 
Colledges and Halls in this University to cause to be sett upp and 
put in execution, the Directory for publique worshippe in their 
said severall Chappelles, according to Ordinance of Parliament: 
And wee allso require that the said Governours, Masters, Heads 
of Colledges, and Halls, shall suffer noe more, or give way to the 
publique use of the Common Prayer, in theyre severall Chappells as 
aforesaid : As they will Answere the Contrary at their Perills. a 

Dr. John Wilkins, the new Warden of Wadham, became Master of Trinity Coll. 
Cambridge, 1659, and Bishop of Chester, 1668. He receives the highest praise as a 
philosopher, divine, and courtier from Wood, Unmet, Kennet, and others. Wood 
" cannot say that there was anything deficient in him but a constant mind and settled 
principles." (Ath. Ox. iii. 968). He was the son of an Oxford goldsmith, and 
married Cromwell's sister. For Dr. Harris, the new president of Trinity, see 
Introduction. 

a " This Order," says Wood, " was not at present regarded." Convocations were 
held by the new Vice-Chancellor on April 14th and 15th, at which numerous degrees 
were conferred. Thirty-seven men were made Masters of Arts. It shows the pre- 
dominance of " Puritanism " at Magdalen and New Inn Halls that out of the above 
number 17 members of those Societies received the degree of Master. Several 
Cambridge men were made Bachelors of Arts. Thus the Visitors had begun at last 
to surround themselves with men of their own side, and now proceed to the reorgani- 
zation of each College under its new Head. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 23 



An Order for bringinge in the Rents, Rentalls, Scales and April 17, 1648. 
Books of Accompt of the severall Colledges in the Uni- 
versity of Oxon : 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon: doe order and 
command all Treasurers, Bursers, and all others whom it may 
concerne, belonginge, or appertayning to the severall Colledges in 
the said Universitie, that within 3 daies after notice hereof they 
bring in to the Heads of their said Colledges established by Order, 
or Ordinance of Parliament, all the Rents, Eentallss, Scales, Bookes 
of Accompt, belonginge or appertayninge to their severall Colledges 
aforesaid : As they will answere the contrary at their perills. 



A retourne of a Refference by the Visitors of the Universitie Aprill 17, 
of Oxon: to the honourable Committee of Lords and 
Commons for reformation of the said Universitie, con- 
cerninge the Salary of the Register and Mandatory, 
Officers to the said Visitors. 

Whereas your Lordships have beene pleased to referre unto us the 
Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon: the consideration of what 
Salary is fitt to be allowed to our Register and Mandatory, for their 
attendance and service donne unto us : Wee have accordingly rp t 
seriously considered thereof, and findinge that the said Register hath 
expended much money in Journeyes, and lyvinge of Clerkes to 
assist him in this our service, and that both of them are very faith- 
full and have taken great paines in their severall places : wee doe 
therefore humbly conceive that a Salary of Tenne shillings per 
Diem is fitt to be allowed the Register, and Five shillings the 
Mandatory, for their past, present, and future service, which wee 
humbly submitt to your Lordshipps consideration. 



24 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 27, 1648. An Order to the Bursers and other Officers of Severall Col- 
ledges to bringe in the Rentalls, Bookes of Accompt, 
Scales, and Keyes of the Severall Offices in the said 
Colledges. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon : doe Order and 
require all Treasurers^ Bursers, and all others whom it shall or may 
concerne, in the severall Colledges, that to morrow morninge 
betweene the houres of eight and nyne of the Clocke, They appeare 
before us (at the Wardens Lodginge in Merton Colledge) and 
bringe in all Registers, Rentalls, Bookes of Accompt, Corne Bookes, 
Scales, and Keyes, belonginge to the severall Offices, in the severall 
Colledges. As they will Answere the contrary at their perills. a 

A Petition of the Yeoman Bedles to the Visitors. 
To the honourable the Visitors for Reformation of the 

University of Oxon : 
Sheweth 

That your Petitioners havinge beene to the utmost of their 
abilities furtherers of a Nationall Reformation, with detriment to 
their Estates; And beinge now called to serve in the places of dis- 
affected persons for the honor of this Universitie; And findinge 
soe little allowances to your Petitioners to subsist with upon the 
dividend of Fees that are paid by any manner of person that takes 
a Degree, and therein soe disproportioned in great allowances to 
some of the Superior Bedles when wee doe the greattest and most 
(P. 18.) constant services : Your Petitioners doe therefore most humbly pray 

a This fresh Order was the effect of a Report made in person by Cheynell and 
Wilkinson to the London Committee. " They make a horrible clamour against the 
University," says Wood. On receiving that Report the London Committee made an 
Order, which, on April 25th, " was stuck up in severall public places in Oxford," 
that the Visitors should " send a new summons to the Fellows and Officers of 
Colleges, and if they do not appear, or appearing shall not submit to the authority 
of Parliament in this Visitation," the Visitors should suspend them, and the 
Committee may "on certificate thereof," remove or deprive them. This is the 
foundation of the further proceedings which occupy the larger portion of the 
Register. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 25 

your Honours, that there may be a more equall and even dividend April 27, 1648. 

in every fee amongst us all : Or if you shall please to settle any other 

allowances by way of addition, yeildinge a constant and comfortable 

subsistence unto your Petitioners, wee shall rest thankefully satisfied. 

Only wee beseech your Honours, that it be ordered, there be an 

equall and even dividend of the money already paid in amongst us 

all, by reason of the many necessary expenses wee have hitherunto 

beene att, and in regard of the longe tyme ere any thinge will arise 

to us for the future: And the rather this, beinge a tyme of creation, 

and not a way of usuall proceedinge to any degree. 

Mr. Webberley (Subrector of Lincolne Colledge, who was 
formerly suspended from the subrectorshipp and restrayned) was this 
day released from restraint, but not from suspension. 

Mr. Palmer (an undergraduate in Christ Church, who was formerly 
committed for contemptuouse speeches against the Lord Chancellor 
and Visitors) was this day released, upon his acknowledgement that 
the words hee spake were rash words. And that hee is sorry hee 
spake anythinge to give offence.* 

Mr. Taylor and Mr. Wray, Butlers of St. John's College, beinge 
this day called before the Visitors, made their humble submission, 
bringinge testimony to free themselues of contempt in not appear- 
inge upon former summons, and thereupon were discharged. 

An Order of the Visitors for Mr. Chibnall, Burser of ff , ( 

Magdalen College : 

Ordered by the Visitors of the Uiiiversitie of Oxon that Mr. 
Chibnall, Burser of Magdalen Coll: appeare before us the Visitors 

a Mr. Palmer, son of the lawyer, Sir Geoffrey Palmer, so well known in Charles II.'s 
reign, was committed to prison on April 14th for insulting the Visitors when they 
reinserted the names of the new Dean and Canon in the Christchurch Buttery-book. 
He attempted to press in past the Guard of Musqueteers, and "being prevented, 
shouted out: "Why? are you ashamed that any should see what you do? " Ho wns 
probably one of the " Scholars " who had previously torn out the leaf. 
CAMD. 8OC. E 



26 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 27, 1648. of this Universitie, at the Warden's Lodginges in Merton Colledge, 
betweene the houres of Foure and Six in the afternoone of this 
Aprill27: 1648: 

April 28 The like to Mr. Harris, Burser of Magdalen Coll: 

1648. 

A viis et modis to Mr. Harris, Burser of Magdalen College : 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon : authorised there- 
unto by severall Ordinances of Parliament and a spetiall Commis- 
sion &c. havinge personally sought you by our Officers who could not 
finde you, doe now Cite you Omnibus viis et modis to make your 
personall appearance in the Warden's Lodginges of Merton Colledge, 
upon this present 28 : of Aprill betweene the houres of one and two 
of the Clocke in the afternoone, to undergoe this present Visitation 
and to Answere such Questions as shall then and there be pro- 
pounded to you. As you will Answere the contrary : 

The like to Mr. Chibnall, one of the Bursers of Magdalen 
College : 

This day Mr. Ward, Burser of St. John's College, appeared 
accordinge to summons, and Answered that hee had not the 
Bookes, Keyes, and other things mentioned in the Order: hee 
desired tyme further, which was graunted till afternoone of the 
same day . And about two of the Clocke the said Mr. Ward and Mr. 
Wallwyn, the other Burser of St. John's College, and Mr. Gisby, 
Senior Deane, appeared, who desired some tyme to give in their 
answeres, which was graunted till Tuesday next, beinge the second 
day of May, at the Vice-Chancellor's Lodgings in Merton Colledge : 

- (P. 20.) Also this day Mr. Kinge, one of the Bursers of Brasnose Colledge, 

appeared and made Answere that hee was Under Burser, and had not 
the Bookes nor Keyes in his custodie, and that hee could not as yet 
meete with the other officers of the house of whom hee might 
procure the Bookes, Rentalls, Scales, and Keyes, accordinge to the 
Order, and was dismissed for that tyme : 



THE VISITORS' REGISTEK. 27 

Likewise this day the Visitors agreed upon an Order, and course April 28, 1648. 
for preachinge in the University, and that Letters should be sent to 
severall Divines out of towne, to acquaint them with the tyme when 
they were to preache, accordinge to the course agreed upon. 



The Letter that was sent to severall Divines from the 

Vice-Chauncellor. 
SIB, 

I am desired to signifie to you from the Visitors of the Universitie 
of Oxon (who have upon seriouse consideration taken care for the 
supply of Sermons in the Universitie), that you are desired to be 
present here upon the day of next, to preach in 

the , accordinge to the Order agreed on by the Visitors. 



An Order to the Butler of Christ Church for bringinge in the May 2 a , 1648. 
names of all the Members of Christ Church. 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, require you, upon 
sight hereof, forthwith to appeare personally before us, and to bringe 
with you a Roll or Note of the names of all the Members of the 
Foundation of Christ Church, and whosoever thereto belonge: and 
hereof faile you not, as you will Answere the contrary. 



An Order for severall Members of Magdalen Colledge to May 2 d , 1648, 

(P. 21.) 
appeare before us : 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, authorised by the 
power of Parliament to reforme and regulate the said Universitie, 
doe require all and everie one of you, who are here undernamed, 
upon sight or notice hereof, to make your person all appearance 
before us in the President's Lodginges at Magdalen Colledge, to 
Answere such Questions as shall be propounded to you, as you will 



28 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 2,1018. Answerc the contrary at your perills: a 

Mr. Parkhurst, Vice-President. 
Dr. Pellam. Mr. Hobs. 

Mr. Forman. Mr. Dale, Junior. 

Mr. Williamson. Mr. Clerke. 

Mr. Law. Mr. Pearce. 

Mr. Drope. Mr. Childs. 

Mr. Holden. Mr. Clutterbooke. 

Mr. Rogers. Mr. Cockes. 

May 3 d , 1648. The Answeres of severall Members of Magdalen College 

to this Question propounded to them : 

The Quest: Doe you submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in 
this Visitation? 11 

1. The Answere of Dr. Pellam : I doe submitt to the authoritie of 
Parliament in this Visitation. 

2. The Answere of Mr. Drope: The question is very high in its 
owne nature, and I am not lawyer enough nor wise enough to give 
an Answere to it. 

3. The Answer of Mr. Rogers : I intreate farther advisement and 
information in this matter, and tyme to consider of it. 

4. The Answere of Mr. Forman: I have taken an oath not to 
give an Answere to any but my owne Visitor in my owne Colledge. 

5. The Answere of Mr. Law : I conceave not my selfe able on the 
sudden to make Answere to the question proposed, without prejudice 
to my selfe or offence to the proposers. 

Daniel Caple : c I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
this Visitation. Oct. 18: M. Coll.] 

a The names of all members of Colleges and Halls which follow are printed as they 
appear in the Kegister. In the Table at the end of this book the spelling is corrected, 
and the names identified, wherever information has been obtainable from the College 
.Registers. 

b The significance of each of the following answers is afterwards determined by 
joint agreement between the London Committee and the Visitors. 

c Daniel Caple's submission was interpolated on Oct. 18. His first answer was 
given on May 5 (p. 45), and was a Non-submission. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 29 

6. The Answere of Mr. Hobs: I acknowledge the power of Par- May 3,^1648. 
liament, and have beene obedient to that power alway to the uttmost 

of my power; but concerninge this poynt in question, I am not 
fully informed whether I can sub mitt with a saffe conscience. 

7. The Answere of Mr. Williamson : That hee doth submitt to the 
authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

8. The Answere of Mr. Cockes : 1 am not able as yet to answere to 
this question, and therefore must desire tyme to consider of it. 

9. The Answere of Mr. Clerke: I am very sorry that I have not 
as yet soe well studied the question proposed to me at this tyme, 
and have not beene soe fully informed about the nature thereof as 
to be able upon a sudden to retourne an absolute Answere thereunto 
with confidence and resolution. 

10. The Answere of Mr. Dale, junior : That he doth submitt to 
the authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation. 

11. The Answere of Mr. Pierce: My Answere is that I dare not 
Answere positively without further deliberation. 

12. The Answere of Mr. Clutterbooke : I want both tyme and 
abilitie to give any Answere to this proposall. 

13. The Answere of Mr. Childs: I dare not be soe presumptuouse 
as to give a positive Answere, without some deliberation, to the 
Question proposed to me. 

The second Answere of William Hobs, July 26, 1648: I submit 
to the power of Parliament in this Visitation.* 

It was at the same tyme further ordered by the Visitors that, 
since the matter and substance of this Question hath beene formerly 
propounded to the Doctors, and is grounded upon the Answere of 
the Delegates, and hath beene argued by Councell before the Com- 
mittee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie of 
Oxon, and also since the late Ordinance of the Lords and Com- 
mons dated the 21st of Aprill, 1648, and hath beene printed and 

a Hohbs' second answer was interpolated on July 26. His change of mind gave 
him and the Visitors some trouble. (See below.) 



30 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 3, 1648. publiquely affixed at the Gate of everie Colledge and Hall, and at 
other usuall publique places a full weeke before any summons were 
sent forth with relation to the said Question: That therefore noe 
further tyme be given for Answere to this Question. 

Present of the Visitors: 

The Vice-Chancellor. Dr. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Kogers. Mr. Hen. Wilkinson. 

Mr. Jo. Wilkinson. 



May 3 d , 1648. An Order for severall Members of Christ Church to 

(P. 23.) , c 

appeare before us : 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, authorised by the 
power of Parliament to reforme and regulate the said Universitie, 
doe require all and everie of you who are here undernamed to make 
your personall appearance before us at two of the Clocke this present 
third of May, at the Deane's Lodginge in Christ Church, to Answere 
such Questions as shalbe propounded to you, as you will Answere 
the contrary at your perills : 

Dr. Mayne. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Hill. Mr. Reade. 

Mr. Benwell. Mr. Lowe. 

Mr. Berkley. Mr. Allestrey. 

Mr. Aubery. Mr. Godfrey. 

Mr. Terrent. Mr. Hilman. 

Mr. Dayrell. Mr. Wood. 

Mr. Tyas. Mr. Teale. 

Mr. Howe. Mr. Seaverne. 

Mr. Edwards. Mr. Richardson. 

Mr. Towneson. Mr. Hill. 

Mr. Smith. Mr. Dolbine. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 31 

An Order for 4 Members of Magdalen College to appeare May 3, 1648. 

before us, May 3 d , 1648: 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, authorised by the 
power of Parliament to reforme and regulate the said Universitie, 
doe require you, and everie of you, who are here undernamed, to 
make your personall appearance before us, this present 3 d of May, 
at 2 of the Clocke in the afternoone, at the Deane's Lodginge in 
Christ Church, to Answere such Questions as shalbe propounded to 
you, as you will Answere the contrary at your perills : 
Mr. Parkhurst, Vice-President. 
Mr. Holden, Mr. Chibnall, Mr. Harris : Bursers. 

An Order to the butlers of Alsoules Colledge : (P 2 4.) 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, require you, imme- 
diately upon sight hereof, to appeare before us at the Deane's 
Lodginge in Christ Church, and to bringe with you the Buttery 
Bookes belonginge to the said Colledge. And hereof faile you not, 
as you will Answere the contrary at your perills. 

An Order to Dr. Mayne : 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxford, authorised here- 
unto by the power of Parliament for orderinge and regulatinge the 
said Universitie, doe require you, imediately upon sight hereof, to 
appeare before us at the Deane's Lodginge in Christ Church, to 
Answere to such Questions as shalbe propounded to you. As you 
will Answere the contrary at your perill. 

It was also ordered this day, that the followinge Question should 
be put unto those who did then appeare, in these words : 

In obedience to an Ordinance of Parliament, wee are to put this 
Question unto you, and to require your Answere thereunto, which 
Answere wee are also to returne to the Committee of Lords and 
Commons for the Keformatioh of the Universitie of Oxon. 



32 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 3, 1648. The Question is this : 

Whether doe you submitt to the authority of Parliament in this 
Visitation ? 

Members of ] . Mr. Fell, his Answere : I understand not what is meant by the 
terme Submitt, .and therefore cannot Answere in judgement to the 
Question propounded unto mee. a 

1648 1 2< ^ r * R ea( H *" s Answere: I doe acknowledge the Parliament 
that is, the King and his two Houses to have the undoubted 
supreame power in this kingdome, and will demeane myselfe 
allwayes peaceably and inoffensively to those sent downe by the 
2 Houses to visit this Universitie. 

3. Mr. Allestrie, his Answere : I am not satisfied in the meaninge 
of the Question. 1 * 

(P. 25.) 4^ ]yj r> Hill, junior, his Answere : I doe acknowledge the Parlia- 

ment that is, the Kinge and his two Houses of Parliament to be 
the supreame power of this kingedome ; and as farre as that power 
does send Visitors to visite this Universitie, soe farre I doe submitt 
to that Visitation. 

5. Mr. Dalbine, his Answere: Forasmuch as to my apprehention, 
theire is some ambiguity in the words of this Question, untill the 
same be further explayned then as yet it is, I cannot make any 
direct or Catagoritall Answere thereunto. 

a John Fell, D.D. son of Dr. Samuel Fell, Dean of Ch. Ch. (For his earlier 
work at Ch. Ch. see Introduction.) Dean of Ch. Ch., 1660; Bishop of Oxford, 1676. 
As Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, in 1666-1669, he contributed greatly to the restora- 
tion of the University from disorder; he was a great benefactor to Ch. Ch. Wood 
describes him as " the most zealous man of his time for the Church of England, a 
great enconrager and promoter of learning in the University, and of all public works 
belonging thereunto; of great resolution and exemplary charity; of strict integrity; 
a learned divine ; and excellently skilled in the Latin and Greek languages." He 
was the author of several considerable works. He died in 1686. 

b Richard Allestree, D.D. : Canon of Ch. Ch., 1660; Reg. Prof, of Div., 1663; 
Provost of Eton, 1665; died 1680. He is chiefly known for his extraordinary zeal 
and courage in the Royal cause during the Civil War, and for his success as Provost 
of Eton, to which institution he was a benefactor. Dr. John Fell wrote his Life. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 33 

6. Mr. Kichardson, his Answerer If by the authority of Parlia- May 3, 1648. 
mcnt is ment the authority of the Kinge and the two Howses, I 
acknowledge it to be the unlimited power of this kingedome, and 

shall submitt to it. 

7. Mr. Gale, his Answere : Forasmuch as I conceave myselfe noe 
fitt judge of the power of Parliament, I will acknowledge it as farre 
as I may accordinge to the lawes, and submitt. 

8. Mr. Tho: Wood, his Answere : I submitt unto the Visitors of 
the Universitie of Oxford, as from the Parliament. 

9. The Answere of Thomas Severne : I shalbe ready to give an 
accompt of my actions to those that are sent downe by both Houses 
as Visitors to the Universitie of Oxford. 

Upon this day wee sent the Mandatory with an Order to summon 
the persons undernamed, beinge Members of Christ Church, the 
butler of the House goinge alonge with him, who, when they heard 
of the summons, rose up from the table where they sate at dinner 
and contemptuously departed, after some scornefull words spoken, 
and refused to appeare accordinge to the summons then declared ; 
but others, whose names and Answeres are above registred, appeared 
upon the same summons. 

Mr. Hill, senior. Present of the Visitors 
Mr. Benwell. this day : 

Mr. Berkley. The Vice-Chancellor. 

Mr. Aubrey. Dr. Wilkinson. 

Mr. Torrent. Dr. Rogers. 

Mr. Howe. Mr. Hen: Wilkinson. 

Mr. Edwards. Mr. Jo: Wilkinson. 
Mr. Hilman. 

This day Mr. Godfrey and Mr. Danby, Masters of Art and ^p 2 6.) 
Members of Christ Church, appeared, who, upon the Question pro- May 4, 1648. 
posed whether they submitted to the Authoritie of Parliament in 
this Visitation, Answered that they did willingcly submitt thereunto. 

CAMI) SOC. F 



34 THE VISITOES' REGISTER. 

May 4, 1648. An Order to the Members of Alsoules to appeare before us : 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, authorised here- 
unto by the power of Parliament to reforme and regulate the said 
Universitie, doe require all and everie one of you who are here 
undernamed, to make your personall appearances before us, at the 
Warden's Lodginge in Merton Colledge, betweene two and three of 
the Clocke in the afternoone, to Answere to such Questions as shall 
be propounded to you: and hereof faile you not, as you will 
Answere the contrary at your perills : 

Mr. Barker. Mr. Smith. 

Dr. Aylworth. Mr. Stradlinge. 

Mr. Greaves. Mr. Smith. 

Mr. Dayrell. Mr. Boham. 

Mr. Prestwich. Mr. Middleton. 
Mr. Berkhead. 

An Order to the Printers and Stationers prohibitinge Sale 

of abusive Pamphletts. 

Wee, the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, appoynted by 
authority of Parliament to reforme and regulate the said Universitie, 
doe hereby require you, and everie one of you hereunder men- 
tioned, that you doe not receave (nor by your selves nor any other 
belonginge unto you or imployed by you), print, publish, sell, 
give, lend, or any other way deliver or disperse any unlycenced, 
lybellous, infamouse, scurrilouse, or abusive Pamphletts, which doe 
defame the names or persons of any, as you will Answere the con- 
trary at your perills. a 

(P, 27.) An Order to the Members of Trinity College to appeare 

before us. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie, authorised by power of 
a Wood gives the titles and beginnings of several of these pamphlets and fly-sheets. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Parliament to reforme and regulate the said Universitie, Doe require May 4, 1648. 
you, and everie of you, whose names are underwritten to appeare 
before us, at the Warden's Lodgings in Merton Colledge to morrow 
morninge betweene eight and tenne of the Clocke in the fourenoone, 
to Answere to such Questions as shalbe demaunded of you, as you 
will Answere the contrary : 

Fellowes. 

Mr. Feighmore. Mr. Lydall. 

Mr. Radford. 



Mr. French. 
Mr. Box. 
D 3 Banger. 
D s Wood. 
D s Douch. 



Schollars. 

D s Pownell. 
Mr. Wirge. 
Mr. Pate. 
Mr. Meese. 

Commoners. 



Mr. Willey. 
Mr. Ettrike. 
Mr. Squibb. 
Mr. Maryatt. 
D s Salmon. 
Mr. Dalender. 
Mr. Russell. 
Mr. Jackson, sen. 
Mr. Jackson, me. 
Mr. Jackson, junior. 
Mr. Bryan. 
Mr. Waddon. 
Mr. Way. 



Mr. Sweete. 
Mr. Yonge. 
Mr. Stevens. 
Mr. Bruer. 
Mr. Harringeton. 
Mr. Hatley. 
Mr. Moore. 
Mr. Phillips. 
Mr. Dunvers. 
Mr. Hodges. 
Mr. Addams. 
Mr. Silvester. 
Mr. Jackson. 



a It is scarcely necessary to remark that " D s " (Dominus) is equivalent to " S r " 
(Senior), or " Sir," as it is often written in this Register, and denotes the Bachelor's 
Degree. " Mr." not only denotes the Master's Degree, but is also the title by courtesy 
of those who are neither Bachelors nor Masters. 



36 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 4, l'M8. Likewise this day the Members of Magdalen Hall gave in their 
Answers : 

Maisters of Arts : 

1. Mr. Stringer: his Answerer I submitt to the authority of 
Parliament in this Visitation. 

2. Mr Homes: his Answers: I doe submitt to the authoritie of 
Parliament in this Visitation. 

3. Mr. Bowden: I submitt, &c. 

4. Mr. Farrall: I submitt, &c. 

5. Mr. Kinge : I submitt, &c. 

6. Mr. Tredcroft: I submitt, &c. 

7. Edward Weele : I submitt, &c. 

8. Kichard Gardner : I submitt, &c. 
(P. 28.) 9. Mr. Sidnam : a I submitt. 

10. Mr. Erase : I submitt. 

Batchlors of Art. 

11. Mr. Mourton : I submitt. 

12. Thomas Nest: I submitt. 

13. Lanclett Bromouth : I submitt. 

14. Thomas Masters: I submitt. 

15. Lawrence Jones : I submitt. 

16. Edward Eyre: I submitt. 

17. Geo Gale : I submitt. 

18. Tho: Trayte: I submitt. 

Undergraduates : 

19. Jo. Ward: I submitt, 

20. Hen. Hurst: 1 submitt. 

21. Thomas Browne : I submitt. 

22. Jo. Geary : I submitt. 

23. Thomas Puller : I submitt. 

24. Jeremy Goldy : I submitt. 

25. Richard Pen : I submitt. 

B This is the famous physician, Sydenham. He was soon afterwards appointed a 
Fellow of All Souls. See Worthies of All Souls. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 37 

26. Edward Hillary : I submitt. May 4, 1648. 

27. Benjamyne Coopers: I submitt. 

28. Theophilus Gale a : I submitt. 

29. Ezekill Webb : I submitt. 

30. William Board : I submitt. 

31. Geo. Cooke : I submitt. 

32. Robert Mansell : I submitt. 

33. Thomas Davis: I submitt. 

34. Henry Leigh: I submitt. 

35. John Kinman : I submitt. 

36. Tho. Yardley : I subraitt. 

37. Phillip Potter : I submitt. 

38. George Weldon : I submitt. 

39. Thomas Conant : I submitt. 

40. John Greenesmith : I submitt. 

41. Edward Short: I submitt. 

42. Daniell Hinkes: I submitt. (P. 29.) 

43. Edward Bury : I submitt. 

44. Samuell Nicholas : I submitt. 

45. Francis Hath way: I submitt. 

46. Steven Richman : I submitt. 

47. Jo. Spilsbery : I submitt. 

48. Luke Sympson : I submitt. 

49. William Milner : I submitt. 

The Members of New-Inn-Hall : , 
Masters of Art : 

Thomas Whitehorne : I submitt. 
Thomas Stevens : I submitt. 

Theophilus Gale, of Magdalen Hall; Fellow of Magdalen Coll. 1650: chiefly 
known by his " Court of the Gentiles : " "a person of great reading, an exact philo- 
logist and philosopher;" "a good metaphysician and school divine;" "wholly 
addicted to Nonconformity." " He left all his real and personal estate for the educa- 
tion and benefit of poor Presbyterian and Independent scholars." Ath. Ox. iii. 1149. 



38 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 4, 1648. Eichard Hodge : I submitt. 
Joshua North : I submitt. 
John Prouse: I submitt. 
Jo. Ford : I submitt. 
Ambrose Upton : I submitt. 

Undergraduates : 
Geo. Tippings : I submitt. 
Walter Skidmore : I submitt. 
Thomas Poyntingedow : I submitt. 
Miles Cooke : I submitt. 
Robert Scudamore : I submitt. 
Thomas Franke : I submitt. 
John Sawyer : I submitt. 
Thomas Cooper : I submitt. 
Charles Mourton : I submitt. 
Bridgman Galloway : I submitt. 
Peter Fiatt: I submitt. 
"William Crab : I submitt. 
Jo. Gildard : I submitt. 
John Wilson : I submitt. 
Nathaniel Mott : I submitt. 
Richard Panier : I submitt. 
Robert Lovell : I submitt. 
Richard Duckworth : I submitt. 
Francis Melson : I submitt. 
Jonas Halmes : I submitt. 
(P. 30.) Tymothy Hart : I submitt. 

Abraham Batten : I submitt. 
Nathaniel Anderson : 1 submitt. 
Robert Hulley : I submitt. 
John Chamberlaine : I submitt. 
Steven Geree : I submitt. 
John Boyes : I submitt. 
Edward Warren : I submitt. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



39 



Tho. Ettwall : I submitt. 
Jo. Moore: I submitt. 

Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. 
Dr. Wilkinson. 
Dr. Rogers. 

The Answeres of the Members of Trinity Colledge. 
Undergraduates. 



May 4, 1648. 



Mr. Hen. Wilkinson. 
Mr. John Wilkinson. 



May 5, 
1648. 



Jo. Dallender 
Richard Russell 
William Waddon 
Benjamyne Way 
John Sweete 
William Hatley 
Thomas Phillips 
Thomas Moores 
Daniell Danvers 



These all gave an Answere that they did 
submitt to the Authority of the Parliament 
in the Visitation : 



John Lydall : My Answere is that I am not satisfied how farre I 
may submitt. 

Richard Wirge: I doe submitt to the Authority of Parliament, 
in this Visitation. 

Bernard Banger : My Answere is that I am not satisfied how See his Answr 
farre I may submitt. fartherpa:101 

John Bownoll : 1 am not satisfied how farre I may submitt. MS/) 

John Pate : I doe submitt to the Visitation of the Parliament, if 
they have a Commission from the Kinge to Visite. 

Phyneas Jackson: I am not as yet satisfied, nor can I perswade (p. 31.) 
my conscience to Answere positively to it. 

Joseph Jackson : I am not fully satisfied how farre I may 
submitt. 



40 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 5, 1648. Theophilus Jackson: I submitt to the authoritie of the Visitors, 
if they have Immediate Commission from the Kinge. 

Thomas Bryan : I never studied State Policie, and therefore can- 
not give any Answere to soe hard Questions. 

Edmund Yonge : I am not satisfied sufficiently to Answere soe 
weighty a Question. 

Richard Stevens : I cannot submitt to this Visitation without a 
Commission from the Kinge. 

William Bruer : I am not fully satisfied of soe great a Question. 

Henry Jackson : I submitt to these Visitors provided they haue 
an Imediate Commission from the Kinge. 

William Hodges : I am not satisfied how farre to submitt to this 
Visitation. 

John Adams : I doe submitt to this Visitation. 

Edmund Silvester: I doe submitt. 

Edward Wood: I submitt to this Visitation. 

May 5, 1648. The names and Answeres of severall Members of Pembrooke 

Colledge. 

Samuell Bruen : a I humbly submitt to the power of Parliament 
restinge in the Visitors, wittnesse my hand. 
Geo. Wightwicke: I doe submitt. 
Peter Jersey: I doe submitt. 
William Brage : I doe submitt. 
Paul Darand : I doe submitt. 

Batchlors of Art. 
Josua Tompkins: I doe submitt. 
Peter Pett: a I doe submitt. 
Robert Drake: I doe really submitt. 
Daniell Harford : I submitt. 
I doe submitt to this Parliament and Visitation : 

From Dod; Mansciple of Trin. Coll. 

* See below, and Introduction. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 41 

Undergraduates. 

William Collins: I humbly submitt. 

William Tole: I humbly submitt. 

John Hall : I doe submitt. 

Roger Kimberley: I doe submitt. 

Thomas Rosewell: I doc submitt. 

Nathaniell Brownesword : I doe submitt. 

John Risley: I submitt. 

Francis Enewas : I doe submitt. 

Robert Parr: I doe submitt. 

Francis Brickenden, Batchlor of Art: I desire tyme to give in 
my Answere to the Question proposed. 

This day S r Brickenden, of Pembrooke Colledge, Batchlor of 
Art, was suspended from the profitts of his place (for behavinge 
himselfe contemptuously towards the Vicegerent of the said Col- 
ledge) untill he gave satisfaction for his offence. 

An Order to Committ Mr. Dale and Mr. Duncombe to the May 5. 

Marshall. Mr. Dale and 

Mr. Duncombe. 
Whereas Mr. Dale, senior, and Mr. Duncombe, have contrary to 

severall Orders made by authority of Parliament, collected divers Marshall of 
Rents due to Magdalene Colledge in Oxon, in an unstatutable way, the Garison 
and have not as yet paid in the moneyes which they have collected 
to Dr. Wilkinson, President of the said Colledge, accordinge to the 
Order of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, bearinge 
date the 21 of Aprill, 1648: These are to authorise you and all 
such as you call to your assistance to apprehend the bodies of the 
said Mr. Dale, senior, and Mr. Duncombe, and keepe them and 
each of them in safe custodie untill they give satisfaction to the 
Visitors of this Universitie. 

The Answeres of the Members of All Souls College, 

May 5th, 1648. (P. 33.) 

Dc or Aylworth, Fellow of Allsoules Colledge, cannot upon the 
sudden give soe certaine an Answere as happily may be expected, 

CAMD. SOC. G 



42 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 5, 1648. and as I could wish, to the Question at this tyme proposed unto mee, 
but shall doe niy best endeavor by advisinge with learned freinds 
to give such satisfaction as that I will by noe meanes appeare guilty 
of denyinge obedience, where I shall learne it may be performed 
salva conscientia. 

Henry Barker : I Answere : If by this noe more be ment bul 
whether I submitt to this Visitation 1 referre you as a Master o: 
Arts to the Answere of the Universitie, given in by the Delegates 
as Fellow of Alsoules, to the Answere of the Colledge deliverec 
before Christmas: If any thinge more be in the Question, I con- 
ceave I am not bound to Answere to it till I have submitted to this 
Visitation. 

John Middleton : My Answere to this Question is, that for whal 
concernes the Universitie I referre to the Answere of the Universitie, 
and for what concernes the House to the Answere of the House. 

Thomas Dayrell : To this Question whether I will submitt to the 
Authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation, I give this Answere: 
That I am not satisfied concerninge the meaninge of the Question, 
But if the meaninge be to submitt to this Visitation, I doe referre 
to the Answeres given in the name of the Universitie and the 
Colledge. 

Geo. Stradlinge: To this Question whether I will submitt to the 
Authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation, my Answere is : That as 
a Member of the Universitie I referre myselfe to the Answere oi 
the Universitie, and as a Member of my Colledge to that formerly 
put in by the Colledge. 

Hugh Boham : To this Question whether or noe will you submitt 
(P. 34.) |. o fa e authority of Parliament in this Visitation, I cannot in com- 
mon prudence give an Answere to a Question before I understand 
the termes wherein it is proposed, as of this I professe I doe not. 

John Prestwich : To this Question whether doe you submitt to 
the authority of Parliament in this present Visitation, My Answere 
is I doe: But with this lymitation, noe further then I may with 
a safFe conscience : my hart shall not reproch mee soe longe as I live. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 43 

Thomas Smith : My Answere to this Question is the same with May 5, 1648. 
those severall Answeres formerly given in, in the names of the 
Universitie and the Colledge. 

L. Smith: I ever thought the high Court of Parliament the 
supreame Power of England, and shall alwayes submitt to that 
Power and authoritie soe farre as lawfully I may. 

Henry Birkhead : I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament 
in the Visitation. 

Wee whose names are under written, beinge desirouse not to be Alsoules 
misunderstood in a matter wee understand not, shall submitt to the Colled & e - 
authority of Parliament in this Visitation, soe farre forth as our 
former oathes will permitt. 

William Hardinge. . Davis: sub-Promus. 

William Griffin: Coquus. Tho. Griffin: Pagetta. 

Rich. Gibbs: sub-Coquus. 

The Answeres of the Members of Magdalen College, (P. 36.) 

May 5 1648. 

Josias Banger : a I desire a little tyme to consider of this soe 
weighty a Question. 

John Carpenter, Undergraduate, Demy: Whereas better judg. 
ments have desired tyme to consider of it, I suppose it would be 
presumption in mee to retourne an extempore Answere. 

Richard Zouch, Undergraduate, Demy : It is beyond my ca- 
pacity to Answere such a difficult Question. 

a Josias Banger's case differs from most. He " desired a little time " on May 5th, 
1648, which was held equivalent to a refusal to submit. On May 15th his expulsion 
is ordered. On June 1st he is heard again, and gives another refusal, with a quota- 
tion " hoc tantum scio, me nihil scire." On June 14th he is to be expelled by 
order of the London Committee. On Nov. 9th he is heard again, submitting without 
reservation ; and a special order declares that having been " put out for undue 
election, he was this day chosen again into Magdalen College." Indeed if the day of 
his appointment is correctly entered he was already reappointed on Oct. 10th. He 
must have had some powerful interest. His subsequent career was that of a 
zealous Nonconformist Minister, as we learn from Bloxham's Register of Magdalen. 



44 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 5, 1648. Mr. Copinger, Demy: I cannot submitt to this Visitation with a 

saffe conscience. 

Batchler of Ed. Phillips : I am not as yet fully resolved whether I may with- 
out violation of my conscience submitt to this Visitation, and can 
give noe positive Answere till I am by some learned Divines and 
lawyers fully resolved. 

Lodovicus Mason, Undergraduate, Demy: I am not of the 
understandinge (my yeares beinge soe tender) to hold your Thesis 
which you propose, either affirmative or negative. 

Tho. Wybox, Under: Demy: To resolve you in this businesse, 
I have not as yet that understandinge in jure, therefore I desire to 
be excused. 

Jo. Drake: To this Question whether I will submitt to the 
authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation, I Answere : that if the 
word Submitt signifie that the 2 Houses of Parliament without and 
against his most excellent Majestic, have a lawfull power to visite 
this Universitie, either by themselves or others : That then I cannot 
in conscience and in regard of my oathes made to my Soveraigne 
and Leige Lord the Kinge, and of the Oathes made to this Uni- 
versitie, without perjury submitt and acknowledge such a power. 
(P. 36.) William Sydenshaw, Commoner and Undergraduate: The Ques- 
/ tion beinge soe sublime, it passeth my weake apprehension to give 
any positive Answere to it. 

Robert Johnson, Commoner, and Undergraduate : I beinge under 
age and in the Governmente of a Tutor, have not the abilitie of 
myselfe to give in a positive Answere. 

Edward Exton, Bacc. Art: I conceave I cannot acknowledge it, 
havinge taken an oath in the Colledge to the contrary. 

William Collis, Bacc. Art: Demy: I cannot be resolved in con- 
science that I should submitt to this Visitation. 

Hugh Holden : The matter required of mee concerninge my 
livelyhood, 1 doe desire tyme to consider with myselfe, and to give 
in a full Answere in a matter soe much concerninge mee. 

H. Yerbury, Probationer : Whereas very learned and juditiouse 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 45 

men have desired tyme, I shall thinke it presumption in mee to May 6, 1648. 
Answere it extempore. 

Tho. Hanbury, Commoner, Undergraduate: I cannot with a 
saffe conscience submitt to this Visitation. 

Da: Caple, Clerke: Undergraduate: This Visitation beinge a 
thinge exceedinge my weake understandinge I can give noe satis- 
factory Answere for the present, but upon further deliberation I 
shall goe as farre as my conscience will give mee leave and permitt 
mee to yeild obedience to the aforesaid Visitation. 

Andrew Searle, Master of Art, Demy : I am not fully resolved in (P. 37.) 
the Question put to me at present, and therefore desire a longer tyme. 

William Bayley, Batchlor of Art, Demy: I with a saffe con- 
science cannot conforme myselfe to this Visitation. 

Walter Stonehouse, Bacc: Art: Demy: I cannot acknowledge 
the Visitors' power, beinge I should contradict that I had formerly 
sworne unto. 

John Nourse, Bacc: Art:, Demy: Untill the Universitie doubts 
concerninge this Visitation are either cleared or solved, I beinge a 
Member hereof cannot without injury to my conscience submitt to it. 

Francis Drope, Bacc: Art:, Demy: I cannot submitt for fear of 
perjury. 

Hugh Wilbraham, Commoner, Undergraduate: To these the 
Visitors of the Parliament, I Answere that my conscience doth soe 
farre dictate to mee, that I dare not submitt to any Visitors which 
I am not certaine have the Kinges Commission. 

Doddingeton Clerke, Demy, Undergraduate: My conscience will 
not give me leave to submitt to the said Visitation. 

Charles Brune, Commoner : It is beyond my weake apprehention 
to give you any positive Answere. 

Tho: Hussey, Commoner: I desire you would not enforce soe 
hard a Question on me, beinge not of yeares sufficient to resolve you. 

William Browne, Bacc: Art:, Demy: I cannot without violation 
of my oath submitt to this Visitation. 

Miles Parrey, Commoner, Undergraduate: My weake capacity (P. 38.) 
cannot resolve you of this soe hard a question. 



46 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 5, 1648. John Kendall, Commoner, Undergraduate : The Question is too 
high for my capacity that I am not able to Answere it. 

Eichard Bartlett, Clerke: I will submitt to this Visitation as 
farre as possibly I can in conscience, and will doe all things belong- 
inge to my place. 

Present of the Visitors this day : 

The Vice-Chancellor. Mr. Hen. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Jo. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Rogers. 

This present sixt of May a Orders were sent to the butlers of 
St. John's Colledge and New Colledge to bringe in to 
the Visitors a Note of the names of all the Members of 
the said Colledges, togeather with their Buttery Bookes. 

Magdalene Mr. Duncomb's Answere, Steward of Magdalene Colledge, May, 

Colledge. 16,1648: 

In my conscience, and in my opinion, by lawe, I cannot sub- 
mitt to this Visitation. 

I willingly submitt to the Visitation as conduceinge to the Re- 
formation of the Universitie. WILLIAM HOPKINS. 

May 8, An Order to the Members of St. John's College to appeare 

1648 ' &c. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon authorised hereunto 
by power of Parliament, to reforme and regulate the said Uni- 
versitie, doe require you, and every of you, whose names are under- 
written, to appeare before us, at the Warden's Lodginge in Merton 
Colledge on Monday, the eight of this Instant May betweene 8 : and 
10: of the Clocke in the forenoone : To Answere to such questions 
as shalbe demanded of you, as you will Answere the Contrary : 

Mr. Vice President. Mr. Inkersell. 

1. Dr. Edwards. 2. Mr. Gisby. 

a On this day Wood reports that the soldiers made a strict search for arms in all 
he Colleges, and seized many. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



47 



Mr. Creede. 
Mr. Goade. 
Mr. Wallwyne. 
Si Mr. Miller. 
Mr. Webb. 

4. Mr. Ward. 

5. Mr. Jennings, Sen. 

1. Sr. Levene. 
Sr. Hitchins. 
Sr. Winward. 

2. Sr. Bell. 

3. Sr. Speede. 

4. Sr. Blackman. 

5. Mr. Vilett. 

Obsonator. 

Promus. 

Subpromus. 



Ballard. 

Davies. 

Hirst. 

Slater. 

Morse. 



Mr. Tillesley. 
Mr. Osbaston. 
Mr. Connyers. 
Mr. Buckeridge. 
Mr. Lownds. 
6. Mr. Jennyngs, Jun. 
Organista. 

Mr. Smith. 

6. Mr. Cooke. 

7. Mr .j Warner. 

8. Mr. Blagrove. 
Mr. Handidey. 
Mr. Pemble. 



Coquus. 

Subcoquus. 

Tonsor. 



May 8, 1848. 



Commensales : 



Frewyn. 
Dighton. 
Wright. 
Randell. 



An Order to the Members of New Colledge to appear, &c. 
May 8, 1648. 

Wee the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, authorised thereunto 
by power of Parliament, to reforme and regulate the said Uni- 
versitie, doe require you, and everie of you, whose names are under- 
written, to appeare before us at the President's Lodginge in Magdalen 
Colledge on Monday the eight of this Instant May, betweene two 



(P. 40.) 



48 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



MayS, 1648. an ^ foure of the Clocke, in the afternoone : To Answere to such 
Questions as shall be demanded of you, As you will Answere the 
Contrary : 

Mr. Lucas, Vice Gustos. Dr. Vivian. 

Bac: Theol: 

Gardner. Barker. 

Hungerford. 

Art: Mm: 

Grove. Coles, Sen. 

Maylard. Bew. 

Goulstone. Hobbs. 

Beesley. Price. 

Lamphire. 

Leg : Bac : 

Twisse. Geeres. 

Tichburne, Ju. Liddiatt. 

Blencowe. Alworth. 

Art : Bac : 

Rivers. Robinson. 

Rowlandson. Foulkes. 

Complen. Marshall. 

Alexander. Brickenden. 

Baineham. Gillingeham. 

Duramer. 

Capellani : 

Grebby. Williamson. 

Warriner. Oakeley. 

Shirlocke. 

Organista : 
Coleman. 

Civilistte : 

Hallaway. Withers. 

Coles, Jun. Grent, Jun. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



49 



Soc. Non: Grad: 

Turpin. Barton. 

Blake. Blunt. 

Bowman. Stanley, Jun. 
Wither, Jun. 

Scolares : 

Trimnell. 
Osgood. 
Mathew. 
Rines, Juu. 



May 8, 1648. 



Hutton. 

Higham. 

Bould. 

Crake. 

Beeston. 



Clerici : 



Coless. 



Knowles. 



An Order to the buttlers of Oriell Colledge to bringe in the names Ma 8 ' 16 | 8 
of the Members of the said Colledge. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon require you, or any 
of you, upon sight hereof to appeare personally before us, and to 
bringe with you a Roll or Note of the names of all the Members 
of Oriell Colledge. And hereof faile not as you will Answere the 
contrary at your perill. 

The like unto the butlers of Corpus Christi, Martin [Merton] 
Colledge, Lincolne Colledge, Jesus Colledge, Exeter Colledge, and 
Baily [Balliol] Colledge. 



The Answeres of the Vice- President and Fellowes of St. John's 
Colledge in Oxon, May 8, 1648. 

Nathaniell Croocher, Vice -President: I shall referre my selfe to 
the former Answere given in by the Colledge. 

John Edwards : I give the same Answere. 

Geor. Gisby : I referre my selfe to our Colledge Answere formerly 
given. 

CAMD. SOC. H 



St John's 
Colledge. 



50 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 8, 1648. William Creede : I referre my selfe to the Answere given in 
formerly by the Colledge. 

Jo: Goade: If you understand any authority of Parliament 
excludinge the King's personall assent I cannot in conscience 
(regulated as I conceive by the undoubted lawes of the land) 
submitt to the authority of Parliament as concerninge this Visi- 
tation. 

William Walwyn: I doe referre myselfe to our former Answere 
given in. 

Tho: Warde : I submitt in all Cases not exempted by Oath. 
Jo: Jennyngs: I referre to our former Answere given in by our 
President. 

Hen: Osbaston: I have beene urged with divers reasons and 
(P. 42.) Statutes, confirmed by Acts of Parliament, and oathes (which I have 
[been] enjoyned by Acts of Parliament to take) by the refusinge, or 
denyinge partie, and for my owne part as yet I have scene nothinge 
satisfactory in defence of the opposite judgement, and therefore 
till better satisfaction I referre my selfe for the present to the 
Answere given in by the Colledge. 

William Conyers : As the Colledge have Answered soe doe I. 
Francis Lownds: I doe acknowledge the authority whereby you 
are our Visitors, and therefore doe most willingely submitt. For 
many good reasons this I propose, as very considerable, and there- 
fore engaginge mee to my opinion, that otherwise I should rather 
hinder and obstruct the worke of Kestoration, which by solemne 
Covenant I am bound to maintayne and promote, should I deny 
the power of the Visitors imployed for this end and purpose. 

Robert Jenings: I submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
all things salva conscientid. And for those oathes with which I am 
bound to observe by Statute you have my Answere included in 
that of the Colledge. 

William Lavene: I am not at libertie to submitt to the power 
of Parliament in this perticuler, beinge restrayned by my oath 
mentioned in the Colledge Answere, to which I referre. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 51 

David Hitchins: Havinge desired the expression and meaninge May 8, 1648. 
of the tearmes of this Question, and not beinge satisfied in the 
matter, I referre my selfe to the Answere given in by the President, 
and the Colledge, untill further Answere. 

Arthur Buckridge : The Oathes I have formerly taken will not 
permitt me to submitt to this Visitation, and I referre myselfe to 
the Answere given in by the Colledge. 

Tho: Winnard: I referre myselfe to the Answere delivered in 
formerly by our President and other Fellowes. 

John Speede : Soe farre as the oathes I have taken will give me 
leave; and how farre that is, the Answere formerly given in by the 
Colledge doth declare. 

Jo: Blackman : Till further satisfaction I referre my selfe to the (p. 43.) 
Colledge Answere. 

Nich: Vilett: I referre my selfe to the Answere formerly 
delivered in by the Colledge. 

Jo: Smith: This question as I conceive is pretended by an 
Ordinance of Parliament, to which I am bound by an oath not to 
submitt, and therefore I referre myselfe wholy to the Answere 
given in by the Colledge. 

Ed: Cooke: Beinge demanded whether I doe submitt to the 
authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation I Answere as farre as I 
may without incurringe the sin of perjury, I doe. But for a further 
Answere I referre my selfe to the Answere formerly given in bv the 
Colledge. 

Tho. Warner: I cannot doe it with a saffe conscience, because I 
am otherwise bound by oath. 

Jo: Blagrove: Beinge demaunded whether I submitt to the 
power of Parliament in this Visitation, I Answere I submitt as farre 
as my oath giveth me leave, and furthermore referre myselfe to the 
Colledge former Answere. 

Francis Webb : I willingely submitt to the authoritie of Parlia- 
ment in this Visitation. 



52 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 8, 1648. John Smith : I submitt to the authority of Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

Tho: Handidey: I submitt to the authority of Parliament. 

Stephen Pemble: Whereas you require mee to declare whether I 
doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation, I 
cannot submitt without the incurringe of the sin of perjury : And 
for further Answere referre my selfe to the Answere delivered in 
by the Colledge. 

William Bell: I beinge a Fellow of that House conceave myselfe 
equally obliged to mentayne the same oathes I have joyntly entred 
into with them : And shall referre my selfe to their Answere to this 
Question, to which I assent. 

James Davies : I doe referre myselfe to the Answere given in by 
the President and Fellowes of this Colledge. 

Martin Hirst: I doe conceive myselfe bound by my oath at 
severall tymes taken for the mayntaining the priviledges and obser- 
vation of the Statutes of this Universitie, also to observe in my 
demeanor the Statutes of the said Colledge: And therefore in 
(P. 44.) Answere to the Question proposed, till further satisfaction therein, 
doe referre my selfe to the Answeres given in, in the name of 
the President and Fellowes of the said Colledge. 

Ed: Slater : To this question proposed I thus Answere, I cannot 
in conscience submitt, beinge obliged to the contrary by severall 
oathes taken by mee, both as a member of this Universitie, and 
also of this Colledge. 

William Morse : I submitt to the power of Parliament in those 
things in which I am not exempted bv Oathes. 

Tho: Frewen : I Answere : I referre my selfe to the Answere 
formerly given in by the Colledge. 

Hen: Dighton : As the Colledge have Answered soe doe I. 

William Wright: To this Question whether I acknowledge the 
authority of Parliament in this Visitation, I Answere, I referre 
my selfe to the former Answere given in by the House. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 53 

Matthew Randell : To this Question I Answere, that I referre Ma 7 8 > 1648 - 
my selfe to the Answere delivered by the President and Fellowes of 
the House, which I cannot conceive to be any contempt, untill I 
have a reasonable satisfaction therein. 
Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. Mr. Chennell [Cheynell]. 
Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Rogers. 

The Answeres of the Members of New Colledge, May, 9, 1648. a 

Mr Lucas, Sub-Warden: For the Visitation of the Universitie I 
referre to the Answere given in by the Delegates. As for my 
Colledge, I am bound by expresse Statute of my Colledge, to 
which I am sworne, to acknowledge noe man my Visitor that 
is an actuall Member of the Universitie. b 

Dr. Vivian : I submitt to the Visitation of the Universitie made 
by the authoritie of Parliament. 

Mr. Gardiner: It is directly contrary to my Colledge oath to 
submit to your Visitation. 

William Barker: Wee are expresly required by the Statute 
of the Colledge (whereunto I am perticulerly sworne), not to 
acknowledge any men for our Visitors that are actuall Members of 
the Universitie, and therefore I humbly conceave if this our obli- 
gation were represented to the honorable Houses of Parliament, 
they would not require our submission to your Visitation. 

Robert Groves: I cannot without manifest perjury submitt to 
this Visitation, at least untill our Colledge Statutes shalbe repealed, 
which exact the contrary. The same Colledge oath renders me 

8 Wood remarks of the following list, that out of 52 who appeared " but one [Dr. 
Vivian] did positively submit, yet some that did not continued in their places by 
friends and cringing to the Committee." (Annals.) 

b This objection is made by nearly the whole College. The Parliamentary 
answer was, no doubt, that the prohibition in the Statutes referred to the Com- 
missaries employed by the Statutable Visitor, but could not be said to meet the case 
of Visitors who were themselves appointed by the Government. 



54 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 8, 1648. incapable of yeildinge submission to the same Visitation, as I am 
a Member of the Universitie. 

Jo: Beesley: I doe conceive my selfe bound by my Colledge 
Statutes, and perticuler oathes to acknowledge noe Visitor that is 
an actuall member of this Universitie. 

John Lamphire : Sirs, I humbly conceive, beinge obliged by my 
Oathes in my Founder's Statutes not to acknowledge any other 
Visitation then which is conteyned there, as yet in conscience I 
cannot conforme to this present Visitation. 

Gilbert Coles : I am expresly by the Statutes and oathes of New 
Colledge, whereof I am a Member, in noe wise to addmitt of any 
Visitors hereof who are actuall Members of the Universitie, and 
therefore humbly conceave if this Obligation which lyes upon mee 
were represented to the honorable Houses of Parliament they would 
not require my submission to your Visitation. 

William Beawe : a I have ever (as I shall produce sufficient testi- 
(P. 46.) mony) , reverently acknowledged the power of Parliament. I have 
neither subscribed nor consented to any publique Acts of this Uni- 
versitie Derogatory to the Covenant, or power of Parliament, as 
lawfull Visitors: I shall therefore humbly request a favorable con- 
nivance to the most indispensable oathes and solemnest engagements 
of my private Foundation : To all the rest, and without prejudice to 
your power in the Universitie in generall, I submitt. 

Hen: Hobbs: Whereas I am stricktly engaged by the Statutes of 
New Colledge in Oxon: (which Statutes I am sworne to mentaine) 
not to submitt to any Visitor or Visitors which is or are actually 
student, or students, within the Universitie of Oxon : I humbly con- 
ceive that I cannot without incurringe that foule sin of perjury sub- 
mitt to this Visitation. 

Jo: Price: I cannot without perjury submitt to you as Visitors, 
at least untill our Colledge Statutes be repealed which exact the 
contrary. 

James Tichborne: 1 doe conceive that I am bound by the 
Afterwards Bishop of Llandaff (1679). 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 55 

Statutes and Oathes of my Colledge, not to acknowledge any men May 8, 1648. 
that are Members actually in the University to be Visitors thereof: 
In relation to the Universitie, to the King's and Parliament's 
authority, I submitt. 

Jo: Geeres: Beinge expresly forbidden by the statutes of our 
Colledge to submitt to or acknowledge any as Visitors who are 
actuall Members of this Universitie; I am not as yet satisfied how 
I can in conscience Answere affirmatively to the Question proposed. 

Kichard Lydiatt : I am bound by the Statutes of our Colledge 
not to acknowledge any Visitors who are Members of this Uni- 
versitie. 

Henry Allworth : Whereas the Statutes of my Colledge (whereto (** * 7 -) 
I have beene solemne sworne) doe expresly enjoyne me not to 
acknowledge any persons as Visitors that are actually Members of 
the Universitie, I dare not soe submitt to you in this Visitation 
lest I should voluntarily incurre (a sin I will never be guilty of) a 
gross and palpable perjury. 

Thomas Kivers : I cannot submitt to this present Visitation with- 
out perjury. 

R. Rowlandson : I am expresly required by the Statutes of New 
Colledge (whereunto 1 am perticulerly sworne) not to acknowledge 
any men for our Visitors who are actuall Members of this Uni- 
versitie, and therefore conceive I cannot (unlesse I should render 
my selfe perjured) submitt to this Visitation. 

Tho: Alexander : It is directly contrary to my Colledge oaths to 
submitt to your Visitation. 

Ro: Bowman: The Colledge Statutes (whereunto I am per- 
ticulerly sworne) doe expresly require me not to acknowledge any 
for Visitors that are actually Members of the Universitie: And 
therefore I cannot submitt to this Visitation without perjury. 

Jo: Barton : I cannot submitt to this Visitation without perjury, 
because our Colledge Statutes expresly commaund the contrary. 

George Crake : By the vertue of my Colledge Statutes, to which 



56 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 8, 1648. T am sworne, I am directly bound not to acknowledge you to be 
my Visitors, beinge actuall Members of this Universitie. 

Henry Beeston: I conceive myselfe guilty of manifest perjury 
should I obey the power in any thinge dissentaneouse either to the 
oath of Allegeance and Supremacy, or my perticuler Colledge oath, 
humbly conceivinge that if this were remonstrated to the honorable 
and just Houses of Parliament they would looke upon it as a con- 
scientiouse and satisfactory Answere. 

Ho : Baynam : I am confirmed in conscience that I may not 
admitt of you as Visitors without beinge guilty of perjury, it beinge 
repugnant to my Colledge Statutes, and my oath taken to mentaine 
the same. 

(P. 48.) Jo: Dummer : Sir, I humbly conceive myself obliged by an indis- 

pensable oath to my perticuler Collegiate Statutes to acknowledge 
noe Visitors of the same Colledge who are actuall Members of the 
same Universitie. 

Anthony Robinson: Gentlemen: If the Question be concerninge 
the power of Parliament in the Visitation of the Universitie in generall 
I Answere then thus : That I am then of the same opinion with 
the Delegates, and that their Answere is myne. Next concerninge 
the power of Parliament in the Visitation of my perticuler Colledge, 
I answere, That for the authority of Parliament I question it not, 
but honor it : But I must humbly conceive that I cannot without 
manifest perjury submitt to it, as authorisinge you to be our 
Visitors, at least untill that power shall have repealed such Statutes 
of our Colledge which exact the contrary of mee. 

Jo: Marshall : The Colledge Statutes (which I have sworne to 
observe) expresly forbid mee to acknowledge any as Visitors which 
are actually Members of this Universitie ; you beinge such I con- 
ceive I cannot (without perjury) acknowledge your power of Visiting. 

Tho: Fowkes : I conceive I may not Submitt to this Visitation 
without the guilt of perjury by reason of private oathes and en- 
gagements taken by me and others admitted into our Society. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 57 

Tho: Brickendcn : I doe humbly conceive that I am not able to Ma y 8, 1648. 
determyne the power of Parliament, but desire that you would be 
pleased to consider that I am bound by oath to the observation of 
the Statutes of my Colledge wherein I am bound not to submitt to 

any Visitors who are actually Members of this Universitie, which 

. (P. 49.) 

I conceive you to be, and I desire that you would consider that I 

give this Answere meerely out of conscience. 

Tho: Gillingeham : I humbly conceive myselfe to be bound by 
those oathes which I have formerly taken concerninge the observa- 
tion of my Colledge Statutes, that I may not admitt of any as 
Visitors (unlesse I should render myselfe guilty of that heynouse 
sin of perjury) that are actuall Members of this Universitie. As for 
the poynt in Visitation of the Universitie, I cannot as yet give any 
positive Answere. 

Robert Graby : I cannot for the present submitt by reason of 
my oath taken to the Colledge, and as a Member of the Universitie 
I referre myselfe to the Delegates' Answere. 

Jo: Warriner: As a Member of the Universitie, I, Jo: Warriner, 
referre myselfe to the Delegates' Answere of the Universitie: As a 
Member of New-Colledge I conceive I am bound by Statutes and 
Oathes not to acknowledge any to be my Visitors who are actuall 
Members or Students in the Universitie. 

Richard Halloway : Should I acknowledge your power in this 
Visitation I cannot but conceive myselfe guilty of perjury : there- 
fore I cannot give an affirmative Answere to this your Question. 

Nicholas Hanley : My Colledge Statutes whereto I am perticu- 
lerly sworne doe expresly forbid mee to acknowledge any Visitors 
of the same, therefore without perjury and forcinge my conscience 
I cannot yeild my obedience : for which cause I humbly conceive 
that if this my Answere were presented to the honorable Howses 
of Parliament they would not require my submission to the Visi- 
tation. And soe I rest your Servant. 

Amb: Blanke: I beinge bound by my oath and Statutes not to 

CAMD. SOC. I 



58 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 8, 1648. acknowledge any Visitor or Visitors who are now actually or have 
beene within this yeare Members of this Universitie, cannot with- 
out perjury submitt to this Visitation. 

(P. 50.) Robert Whither : The Colledge Statutes, which I have solemnely 

sworne to observe, doe expresly forbid me to acknowledge any as 
Visitors which are actually Members of the Universitie, so that I 
conceive I cannot in conscience (without perjury), till that clause in 
our Statutes is repealed, acknowledge your power of Visitinge: 
This I hope you will conceive the humble, modest, and honest 
Answere of ROBERT WITHER. 

John Coles : I cannot in conscience submitt to this present Visi- 
tation, it beinge expresse perjury by the Statutes of our Colledge 
soe to doe. 

Gilbert Wither : The authority of Parliament I doe not question, 
but I humbly desire them to consider that I cannot submitt unto 
this Visitation unlesse our Statutes were repealed, which binde mee 
to the contrary. 

Jo: Hutton: Our Colledge Statutes (all which I have perticulerly 
sworne to observe) doe expresly forbidd mee to acknowledge any 
as Visitors which are actuall Members or Students of this Uni- 
versitie: soe that I conceive I cannot (without manifest perjury) 
acknowledge your power in the Visitinge of mee. 

Tho: Grent: Because you are hasty I'll reply breifely: I am 
absolutly obliged by New Colledge Statutes (to which I am sworne) 
not to acknowledge any Visitors thereof who are actuall students in 
the Universitie: Ergo I conceive, if this were represented to the 
honorable Houses they would not compell mee to violence my 
conscience. Sic stat sententia: 

THO: GRENT. 

Robert Mathew: Upon your summoninge I have perused the 

Statutes of our Colledge, and thereby I am convicted (as I conceive) 

of flatt perjury if I should submitt to you or any other which are 

(P. 51.) actually Members of this Universitie as Visitors: and I believe if this 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 5 ( J 

burden of our conscience were represented to the honorable Houses May 8, 1648. 
of Parliament they would not be urgent in such a complyance. 

Henry Bould: Beinge sworne to the Statutes of New Colledge, 
I cannot safely acknowledge, or, guiltlesse of perjury, submitt to any 
as Visitors which are present Members of the Universitie. 

William Coles: I cannot in conscience submitt to this Visitation, 
it beinge against the expresse Statutes of our College soe to doe : 

Nicholas Knowles : I cannot in conscience submitt to this Visita- 
tion, it beinge expresly forbidden by our Statutes soe to doe. 

Roger Heigham : I conceive myselfe expresly bound by our 
Colledge Statutes, and Oathes, not to admitt of any Visitors hereof, 
who are actuall Members of the Universitie : And therefore cannot, 
I conceive without perjury submitt to your Visitation. 

Charles Blunt : I cannot without manifest perjury submitt to this 
Visitation, it beinge repugnant to New Colledge Statutes to which 
I am sworne. 

Edmund Rynes : Whereas the Statutes of New College (where- 
unto I am sworne) doe stricktly require that wee submitt to noe 
Visitors which are Students in this Universitie, or have Office in it, I 
conceive that I cannot without perjury submitt unto you as Visitors. 

Chris : Turpin : Whereas the Statutes of New Colledge (which I 
am by an indispensible oath sworne to maintayne) will not admitt 
of any Visitors actually students in this Universitie, I am clearly of 
opinion that without the incurringe the sin of perjury I cannot 
submitt to this Visitation. 

Charles Tremnell: Whereas I am sworne to mentayne the 
statutes of New Colledge, I cannot without manifest perjury admitt 
of any Visitors who are actually students of this Universitie: where- 
unto I subscribed. 

Richard Osgood : I conceive by our Colledge Statutes to which ( p - 52 -> 
I am sworne, that I cannot acknowledge you my Visitors, nor any 
besides who are actuall Members of the Universitie, without perjury. 

Henry Complen : I doe net conceive that I can submitt to this 
Visitation without perjury. 



60 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 8, 1648. Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. Mr. Hen. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Chennell [Cheynell]. 

Dr. Kogers. 

t 1G4S ] William Finch head Cooke of New Colledge : I William Finch 
doe submitt unto the authentic of Parliament in this Visitation 
of the Universitie of Oxon : this is the Answere of William Finch, 
given about August last: 1648. 
Mr. Flexney : Barbor : submitts. 

53 -) The Answere of the Fellowes and Members of 

Exeter Colledge. 

Henry Tozer : Concerninge this Visitation, I referre myselfe to 
the Answeres of the Universitie, and of Exeter Colledge in October. 

John Mertin : I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
the present Visitation of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Francis Howell : I submitt to the authority of Parliament in the 
Visitation of this Universitie : 

Anthony Clifford : I submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

Robert Hancocke: I submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

Jo: Bidgood : Concerninge this Visitation, I referre to the 
Answere given in by the Colledge in October last. 
\ Thomas Ince : I doe submitt to the Authority of Parliament: 

William Standard : I referre my selfe to the Answere delivered 
in by Exeter Colledge, in October last. 

W: Standard : a I doe acknowledge the authority of Parliament as 
much as any man livinge. 

Richard Guntion : I doe acknowledge this to be a lawfull 
Visitation. 

Jo : Hitchins : I cannot submitt to this Visitation. 

a As there^ is only one W. Standard on the rolls of Exeter College, this second 
answer is probably a part of that given above. See Boase's Register of Exeter 
College, 1879. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 61 

Jo : Barbon : I cannot submitt to this Visitation. May 8, 1648 

Francis Chichester : I cannot submitt to this Visitation. 

Thomas Clifford : a I cannot submitt to this Visitation. 

Richard Langworthie : I havinge noe Interest in this Universitie 
cannot tell whether I may acknowledge or noe : 

Thomas Browne : I cannot submitt in conscience till an Answere 
be given to the Answere of the Delegates. 

Jo : Cuttcliffe : I cannot submitt to this Visitation. 

Jo : Francis : I doe humbly submitt unto the Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

Charles Sambe : I doe willingely submitt to the authority of 
Parliament concerninge the reformation of the University of Oxon: 
and doe humbly acknowledge my selfe subject to those whom they 
have appoynted the Visitors thereof. 

Tho : Voysey : I humbly submitt to the authority of Parliament ( p - 5 *-) 
in the present Visitation of this Universitie. 

William Norice: I cannot acknowledge this to be a lawfull 
Visitation. 

Jo : Prack : I cannot submitt to the Visitation. 

Thomas Caren : I will not submitt to this Visitation. 

Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. 

Dr. Wilkinson. Dr. Rogers. 

Mr. Hen. Wilkinson. 

Mr. Chennell. [Cheynell] 

John Maudit : Fellow of Exeter Colledge : I most willingly sub- 
mitt unto the authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

The Answeres of Corpus Christi Colledge, May 9th, 1648. (P. 65.) 

George Stratford: To the Question, whether I doe submitt to the May 9, 1648. 
Authority of Parliament in this Visitation, I Answere : I referre 
my selfe to the Answeres which the Delegates for the Universitie 
[have] given in Answere to this Quere. 

* Afterwards the famous Lord Clifford of the Cabal Ministry. 



62 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 9, 1648. Tho : Drury : As I am a Member of the Universitie, doe referre 
my selfe to the Answere given in by the Delegates : As I am a 
member of Corpus Christi Colledge doe referre my selfe to the 
Answere given in by our President, as relatinge to this question 
concerninge Visitation. 

Geo. Halsted: As concerninge the Question of the power of 
Parliament in this Visitation and my submission thereunto, I 
referre my selfe unto the Answere given by the Delegates of this 
Universitie, chosen for that purpose. 

James Jackson: I doe referre my selfe to the Answere given in by 
the Delegates concerninge the Visitation of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Henry Dutton : I Henry Dutton as a Member of this Univer- 
sitie (concerninge the Question of Visitinge the Universitie), I 
referre my selfe to the Answere of the Delegates. And con- 
cerninge the Visitation of our private Colledge, I referre my selfe 
to the Answere of our President, formerly given in to this Question. 

William Chidley: I William Chidley concerninge this Visita- 
tion, doe referre my selfe to the Answere given in by the Delegates 
of the Universitie, and by our Colledge of Corpus Christi. 

Edward Eales: As concerninge the power of Parliament in this 
present Visitation, 1 referre my selfe to the A nswere formerly given 
in by the Delegates of the Universitie. 

(P. 56.) Tho : Jennyngs : Whereas it clearly appeares by the Priviledges 
of this Universitie, that the Visitation of it is soly in the Kinges 
power, or in the power of those who imediately dirive their autho- 
rity from him soe to do, this beinge considered, I cannot submitt 
to these Visitors appoynted by the Parliament: As I am a Member 
of C: C: Colledge I cannot without perjury acknowledge any 
Visitors but the Bishop of Winchester. This is my Answere to 
which I subscribe. THO: JENNYNGS. 

Zachary Bogan : When I shal be satisfied in conscience that I 
may lawfully doe it, I will readily submitt. 

William Lydall : I give in the same Answere as our President 
has already given in to the same Question, and to that I subscribe. 

Henry Glover: As I have noe voyce in the Convocation I con- 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 63 

ceive myselfe not obliged to Answere to this Question : As I am a May 9, 1648. 
Member of the Universitie I referre myselfe to the Answere of the 
Delegates : As a Member of Corpus Christi Colledge to the Answere 
of our owne President. 

Timothy Parker: I doe referre myselfe solely to the Answere 
which was given in by our President. 

Tim: Shute : I referre my selfe to the Answere given in by our 
President. 

William Coldham: I referre myselfe to the Answere formerly 
given in by our President. 

Rich: "Ward : As touchinge the Visitation of the Universitie in 
generall I referre my selfe to the Answere of the Delegates : As 
for the perticuler Visitation of our Colledges I referre myselfe to 
the Answere of our President. 

Hen: Stapleton : I Henry Stapleton doe hereby referre myselfe 
to the Answere of the Delegates. 

James Metford : Havinge Questions propounded to mee I give (** 5 7.) 
in this by way of Answere : That forasmuch as I am a Member of 
this Universitie, I referre my selfe to the Answere of the Delegates : 
and as beinge a scholler of Corpus Christi I referre my selfe to the 
Answere of Dr. Robert Newlin, President thereof. And soe much 
1 Answere. 

Tho: Johnson : In generall for the Visitation of the Universitie, 
I referre my selfe to the Delegates : In perticuler for the Visitation 
of our Colledge I referre my selfe to the Answere of our President. 

Jo: Betts : My Answere as I am a Universitie man is the same 
with the Delegates : As I am of Corpus Christi Colledge it's that 
of the President. 

Will Stampe: I William Stampe for submission to your autho- 
ritie in Visitinge the Universitie doe referre myselfe to the Answere 
given by the Delegates : And in perticuler in Visitinge our Col- 
ledge doe referre my selfe to the Answere of our President. 

Jo: Fountaine : This is my Answere : I cannot submitt. / 

Gamaliell Clarson : I beinge a member of this Universite, and of 



64 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 9, 1648. the aforesaid Colledge, doe referre myselfe to the Answere of the 
Delegates and the Answere of Dr. Newlin in behalfe of the Col- 
ledge. 

Will: Tonstall : I referre my selfe to the Answere given in by 
the President. 

Samuell Ladiman, Ba: Arts: Submitts. 

Thomas Sanderson: Concerninge the poynt of Visitation, my 
Answere is breifely this : First that as I am a publique Member 
of the Universitie I am not satisfied how I can without manifest 
perjury submitt to this present Visitation, or any other whatsoever, 
whereunto the Kinge hath either given a denyall, or at least, not 
given his consent. And this is the sence of the Delegates Answere 
(P. 58.) formerly presented to you. 

Secondly, that as I am a private Member of Corpus Christi Col- 
ledge, I know not how I shall acquitt my selfe of the same horride 
cryme of perjury if I submitt to any other person as my lawfull 
Visitor then whom the Founder hath expresly appoynted in his 
Statutes, which everie Member of the Foundation is bound by 
oath to observe and mentayne. And this I take to be the sence 
of the President's Answere formerly delivered to you in the name 
of the Colledge. To both which Answeres beinge more full and 
satisfactory I referre and subscribe. 
Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. 

Dr. Wilkinson. Dr. Rogers. 

Mr. Wilkinson. 

Mr. Chennell. [Cheynell] 

May 11. An Order prohibitinge sale of Wood belonginge to St. John's 

Colledge. 

Whereas doctor Baily, late President of St. John's Colledge, in 
the Universitie of Oxon. is ejected by authoritie of both Houses of 
Parliament, and divers senior Fellowes and officers of the Colledge 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 65 

a forsaid, have refused to submitt to the Authoritie of Parliament May 11, 1648. 

in this present Visitation of the Universitie aforesaid : These are to 

require you strictly to prohibit and hinder the cuttinge, sellirige, 

and carryinge away of any wood, or underwoods, belonginge to 

the Colledge aforesaid, upon any pretence of authority from Dr. 

Baily, or any of the Bursers or Officers of St. John's Colledge 

aforesaid, and to retourne the Names of such as presume to cutt, 

sell, or carrie away any woods (or lycence any person or persons 

to carrie away any that is already cutt) unto us the Visitors of the 

Universitie aforesaid, and hereof you are not to faile, as you will 

Answere the Contrary at your perill. 

To the Woodward, and such others as are 

entrusted with the Woods belonginge to 

St. John's Colledge. 

The Answeres of Oriell Colledge, May 9, 1648. a (P. 60.) 

Robert Say, Decan : I am not yet satisfied how I can performe 
what is required of mee without violation of my conscience. 

Jo: Rouse: I doe not refuse absolutely to submitt to the Ordi- 
nance of Lords and Commons ; but, beinge not as yet satisfied in 
some perticulers which I may peradventure hereafter, I humbly 
crave to deferre it untill I be more fully informed. 

Nicholas Brookes : I humbly conceive that as yet I cannot, with- 
out violation to such othes as I have taken to and in the Universitie, 
submitt unto your proposalls. 

William Wasbourne : Were I sufficiently perswaded that I might 
submitt to this Visitation salva conscientia, I should readily obay it; 
but, not beinge satisfied herein, I cannot at present give any fuller 
Answere. 

Henry Chamberlaine : I referre my selfe to the Answere given in 
by the Universitie, And to that other given in by Oriell College. 

a Of the following ten members of Oriel, "Wood says: " Though they did not 
directly submit, yet the greater part of them kept their places by the same means 
that others did." (Annals.) 

CAMD. SOC. K 



66 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 9,1648. Sharingeton Sheldon: I cannot submitt to the Visitors appoynted 
by the honorable Houses of Parliament, it beinge contrary to the 
oathes I have taken, and in that prejuditiall to my conscience. 

Arthur Acland : I shall humbly submitt to this Visitacion when 
it shall be made cleare to me that I may doe it without violation of 
my oathes formerly taken. 

Philipp Bowch : I cannot in my conscience performe these things 
required of mee, havinge taken (as it seemes to mee) contrary 
oathes both to my Colledge and the Universitie. 

(P. 61.) Richard Sanders : I am as yet unsatisfied concerning the meaninge 
of severall perticulers in this Question proposed : And therefore am 
not able to give a determinate Answere thereunto untill I shall 
better understand it. 

Jo: Buncombe: Sirs, I doe desire a further tyme to Answere 
the proposed Question, but that beinge not obtayned, I must have 
recourse to the Answere of the Delegates of the Universitie, who I 
doubt not have given noe unsatisfyinge Answere, And to that I 
subscribe; but hopinge withall that if hereafter, upon further exa- 
mination of the poynt, my judgement shalbe otherwise informed, 
you will then accept of a more full and satisfyinge Answere. 

(P. 62.) The Answeres of the Fellowes, Members, &c. of 

May 10, 1648. Brasenose Colledge, May 10th, 1648. 

Tho: Sixesmith : I doe submitt to Kinge and Parliament in this 
Visitation, as farre as lawfully I may. 

Jo: Newton : I dare not submitt to the power of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

Byrom Eaton: With all humble reverence I submitt to any 
authority not derogatory to the knowne lawes of the land, the 
Statutes and priviledges of the Universitie and my Colledge, and 
my severall legall oathes and obligations. 

Randolphus Rawson : I freely submitt to any power, and acknow- 
ledge any Visitation which the lawes of the land, the Statutes of the 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 67 

Universitie and of our Colledge, have by sevcrall oathes and sub- May 10, 1648. 
scrip tions respectively engaged inee unto. 

Kobert Jones : I shall readily submitt to the power of the honor- 
able Parliament, with this provisbe that nothinge be pressed upon 
my yet unsatisfied conscience by them or their Commissioners con- 
trary to the revealed will of God, the knowne lawes of the land, 
or any oath heretofore lawfully taken by mee. 

Kichard Furnivall : I will submitt to this Visitation as farre as it 
stands with the law of the kingedome and to the oath of our 
Universitie and Colledge. 

Ka: Hulton : I am sworne to observe the Statutes of our Col- 
ledge : I cannot therefore submitt to any Visitation without viola- 
tion of my oath, but such as the Statutes doe require. 

Kichard Adams : I doe most willingely and readily submitt to the 
Authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Kobert Kinge: To the knowne lawes of the land, the Statutes (P. 63.) 
of the Universitie, and my private Colledge, I doe with all humble 
reverence submitt, and am ready either to cleare my innocency, if 
accused, or to undergoe the penalty they impose when I am called 
before the proper and competent judges either of the one or 
other. 

Kichard Cande : I acknowledge any power and submitt to any 
Visitation which shall not impose any thinge upon mee contrary to 
the Oathes I have formerly taken. 

William Burges: I shall willingely submitt soe farre as the 
knowne lawes of the land, the Statutes both of the Universitie and 
Colledge, with the oathes by me legally taken, shall permitt. 

Jo: Broster : I doe and will submitt to this present Visitation soe 
farre as my former oathes to the University and Colledge, which I 
am bound to obay, will permitt. 

James Oateley: Beinge summoned in to retourne my Answere, 
whether I submitt to the Ordinance of Parliament, I doe not: 
beinge as I conceive against my oath. 

Richard Chamberlaine : It appeares by the Charter of this Uni- 



68 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 10, 1648. versitie that it cannot be visited by this Parliament. Therefore I, 

beinge a Member of it, because of my oathes, cannot submitt. 
Bras Nose I submitt to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation : 

Colledge: RICHARD HILL. 

Tho: Ashton: I am willinge to submitt to any superior authority 
soe farre as I may lawfully without the violation of God's lawe or 
breach of any oath which I have made, or breach of any lawfull 
Statute of the Founder, or without burdeninge my conscience. 

Tho: Gourney : I doe willingely submitt to any power of Parlia- 
ment, and acknowledge any Visitation which may agree with the 
Statutes of the Universitie, and of our perticuler Colledge, to which 
I am by sever all oathes respectively obliged, and thereto I 
subscribe. 

Walter Whitney: I submitt my self to any lawfull Visitation as 
farre as it be not any way prejuditiall to my conscience: I have 
taken an oath to observe and keepe the Statutes of the House as 
neere as ever I can possibly. 

(P. 65.) The Answeres of the Students of Christ Church College in 

Oxford, given in the 10th of May, 1648. 

William Finmore: I am not yet satisfied how I may with a saffe 
conscience submitt to this Visitation. 

Jo: Stanynoughe : I am not able to give a positive Answere, by 
reason I doe not understand to whom the power of Visitation 
belongs. 

Robt. Richard [Robert] Whitehall: As I am summoned as a Member 

of the Universitie I referre myselfe to the Delegates of the Uni- 
versitie : As I am summoned a Student of Christ-Church my name it 
selfe speakes for mee that I can acknowledge noe Visitation but K: 
Charles. 3 

a " Robert Whitehall, a time-serving and pot-poet of that House." He is said to 
have answered : 

" My name's Whitehall, God bless the poet; 
If I submit the King shall know it." 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 69 

Tho: Hill : I cannot satisfie your demands without manifest Ma 7 10 > 16*8. 
perjury. 

Kichard Washbourne : Without manifest perjury I cannot submitt 
unto the power of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Tho: Terrent, Student of Christ Church: I conceive I cannot 
satisfie this demaund without incurringe the danger of perjury. 

Ralph Tounston : I cannot submitt without perjury. 

Jo: Berkeley: I cannot submitt without multiplicitie of perjury 
to Kinge Charles. 

Ed : Fettiplace : I submitt to the authority of Parliament in this (P. 66.) 
Visitation. 

Jo: Smith : I cannot satisfie your demands (as farre as I yet 
understand them) without perjury. 

Jo: Edwards : If the Question be proposed to me as Student of 
Christ Church, I can acknowledge noe Visitors of Christ Church 
but the Kinge : If as Member of the Universitie my Answere is 
involved in the Answere of the Delegates. 

Samuell Jackson : If the Question be proposed to me as a student 
of Christ Church, my Answere is I can acknowledge the Kinge 
only to be Visitor of Christ Church : If, as I am, a Member of the 
Universitie, my Answere is included in that of the Delegates. 

Heylyn : I am not as yet fully resolved whether that yee are 
right Visitors, soe that I cannot give you a satisfactory Answere. 

Blase Caryll : Before the doubtfulnesse of this terme Submitt be 
explaned, I cannot give a positive Answere. 

Ge: Hinde: I have already taken oathes injoyned me by 
the Colledge, by which I am bound to submitt, first to the Kinge, 
and then to those Governors imediately instituted by him, and in 
this respect I conceive I am not in a capacity of subscribinge to 
any other authority, lest I should make my selfe a perjured man. 

"which person was soon after ejected; but by cringing and flatteries made to Richard 
Ingoldsby, the regicide, the Committee for the Reformation of the University put 
him into the Society of Merton College, an. 1650, where he yet remains (and so he 
will to his dying day)." (Annals.) 



70 THE VISITOKS' KEGISTER. 

May 10, 1648. Francis Dixon : I Francis Dixon shall not submitt to any 
Visitors but the Kinge and doe acknowledge noe Visitor but the 
Kinge. 

Jo. Carricke : I John Carrike will not submitt to this Visitation : 
I will not. 

Geo: Annesley: I Geo: Annesley doe not well understand this 
terme of Submission, and when I shall be satisfied of that poynt, 
I shall soone give a satisfactory Answere. 

(P. 67.) C: Lowther : for the first Question I referre my selfe to the 
Answere of the Delegates. 

Giles Waringe : By reason of the/ ambiguity of the termes I 
cannot give any positive answere hereunto. 

T: Whiteford: I humbly desire to hold my Student's place at 
Christ Church, submittinge to the Visitation of the Universitie 
accordinge to the Articles of the Surrender of Oxford. 

William Master : I am not yet satisfied whether I may submitt 
to this Visitation. 

Geo: Master : I cannot submitt. 

Lewis Palmer: I am not yet satisfied whether these men be 
lawfull Visitors or noe, and therefore cannot submitt. 

Robert Loyde : fforasmuch as that relation I have to the house 
obligeth mee noe further then to be here now and gonne to-mor- 
row I thinke I am not concerned in this Visitation. 

Hen: Gregory: I Henry Gregory acknowledge that none but 
the Kinge, or whom the Kinge shall imediately commaund, can 
Visite this Universitie : Therefore unlesse you have a warrant 
from the Kinges owne hand, I cannot acknowledge you to be right 
Visitors. 

Jo: Gardiner: I am bound by conscience to submitt to noe 
Visitation unlesse it be appoynted by the Kinge : I conceive this 
Visitation is not appoynted by the Kinge, therefore I may not 
submitt. 

Robert Hampton : Whereas the power of the Visitation of this 
Colledge is only in the power of Kinge Charles, by the grace of 



t 
THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 71 

God Kinge of England, Scotland, Fraunce, and Ireland, I dare not May 10, 1648. 
submitt to any Visitation unlesse by his appoyntment. 

Paul Egott: Although my submission to the power of Parlia- 
ment in this Visitation were denegable without perjury : yet beinge 
a Member of this Universitie, and havinge therein "Satisfactory 
reasons as formerly alledged by the same Universitie for to confirme 
my denyall, I cannot therefore, as I yet conceive, [acknowledge] any 
but the Kinge as Visitor. 

Henry Hene: I doe not conceive that this Visitation doth at all (p. 68.) 
concerne me. 

Francis Duncombe : I doe not conceive the Parliament's authority 
in this Visitation. 

Francis Farnaby : Gentlemen ; If you aske me the Question as a 
Member of Christ Church I doe acknowledge my selfe to Answere to 
noe Visitation but in which the Kinge hath power : If you aske 
me the Question as a Member of the Universitie, I referre my selfe 
to the Answere of the Universitie. I have noe place to loose. 

Mathew Kellett: I am noe Member of the House, nor can I 
submitt but by the Kinges authoritie. 

Jo: Washbourne : I beinge a Commoner havinge noe allowance 
from this or any other Colledge, but beinge at my owne dispose, 
thinke myselfe not any way to he concerned in this Visitation. 

Richard Godfrey, Student of Christ Church: I judge the autho- 
ritie of Parliament to be sufficient to commaund my submission, 
and the Solemne League and Covenant which I have taken doth 
oblige mee thereunto : therefore I willingely submitt to this Visita- 
tion. 

James Whaley : As I am a Member of this House I can acknow- 
ledge only the Kinge Visitor : As I am a Member of the Uni- 
versitie I referre you to the Answere given by our Delegates. 

Jo: Hilman: To the Question propounded I Answere: That I 
cannot without drawinge the guilt of manifold perjurys upon my 
soule, submitt to this Visitation. 

Ed: "Westfeild: My conscience tells me that I am not bound 



72 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 10, 1648. either for the house or Universitie to obey any other Visitor then 
the Kinge, or those which are sent by a power imediately derived 
from him. 

James Heath : I cannot satisfie my conscience concerninge my 
submission to this Visitation untill I shall know a true and genuine 
sence of these words. 

(P. 69.) Phillipp Henry : I doe willingely submitt to any thinge that I 

may, with a saffe conscience, and without perjury . a 

Adam Littleton: Forasmuch as I understand not in what 
meaninge this Question proposed by you is to be taken, I cannot 
give a direct Answere to it till it be explained to mee. 

R: Bryan : I know not in whom lyes the power of Visitinge, and 
therefore cannot give any Positive Answere. 

Phillipp Gerard : If you that are sent downe as Visitors to the 
Universitie of Oxon by both Houses, shall propose any Question 
to mee concerninge myself alone, I shalbe ready to give an Answere. 

Christopher Bennell: I doe not conceive that I can submitt to 
this Visitation without breach of oath. 

Jo: Auberey: If I did conceive your Visitation were not dis- 
agreeable to the oathes by me formerly taken, I should submitt. 

Walter Dayrell : I conceive this question is not demaunded to 
be Answered. 

Richard Howe: Master of Arts, and Student of Christ Church: 
I have desired to know whether I am summoned as Fellow, Scholler, 
or Member of Christ-Church : kuowinge that I am not Fellow, and 
knowinge that Scholler in the Universitie phrase speakes not Master : 

This answer is of the exact form which, by agreement between the Visitors 
and the London Committee, was to carry expulsion, and Philip Henry's name 
is accordingly found amongst those of persons ordered to be expelled; but nothing 
of the sort happened to him. The Earl of Pembroke, the Chancellor, was his god- 
father, and " by his favour he was continued in his Student's place " (Life by his 
son, reprinted in Wordsworth's Eccles. Biog. vi. 138). This eminent Noncon- 
formist, whom we have already quoted in the Introduction, was the father of the 
still more celebrated Matthew Henry, the commentator. Richard Bryan, his intimate 
friend, also kept his place in spite of his negative answer; and there were, no doubt, 
many similar cases. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 73 

And Member of this House hath beene alwayes used to distinguish Ma 7 10 > 1648 
the Students from others of that House: And therefore beinge ready 
to appeare when I shalbe legally and distinctly called, I shall hope 
that I am not concerned (consideringe that in all former summons 
and transactions betweene the Students, and any which have sum- 
moned us, wee have beene expressed Students) in givinge any 
other Answere then that I am Master of Arts and Student of 
Christ-Church. 8 

Edw: Terry: Whereas I have noe engagement to this Foun- 
dation, I doe not conceive that this Visitation doth concerne mee. b 

Lewis Atterbury : I will submitt to this Visitation authorised by 
Ordinance of Parliament. 

Humfrey Butler : Whereas I beinge a Commoner here doe CP> 70.) 
receave noe benifitt from the House, but livinge at great expences, 
and doe expect daily to be taken from hence by my frends, I 
thinke this Visitation doth not concerne me. 

Gilbert Pigeon: I doe not conceive the Question proposed 
properly to appertaine unto me, beinge not of the Foundation of 
this House. 

Joseph Bewley : I desire to acknowledge the power of Visitation 
to be just, and humbly submitt. 

Kobert Lowe : Forasmuch as ambiguity does disguise the sence 
of the word Submitt ; till I doe more plainley understand it, I can 
give noe satisfactory Answere. 

Isaiah Ward : I desire humbly to submitt to this Visitation and 
Visitors appoynted by the authoritie of both Houses of Parliament. 

Nathaniell Foster, Poore Scholler of the House : I humbly submitt 
to this Visitation authorised by the Parliament. 

R Wood tells us something farther as to Kichard Howe's answer: " Mr. Chej'nell 
thereupon asked him, ' Are not you a Scholar?' Howe answered, ' Yes, and so are 
all freshmen,' adding this, ' Would not you Dr. Wilkinson, and you Dr. Rogers, take 
it ill* to be called Scholars? ' There was no more said ; only some smiled, and the 
rather let him so pass, because the University never took those Doctors to be any 
scholars, only persons of beard and reverence." (Annals.) 

b (See p. 74.) 
CAMD. SOC. I, 



74 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 10, 1648. j Edward Terry "upon second thoughts submitt to the Authority 
of Parliament in this Visitation, though I was unwilling at first to 
publish my submission, because I had no engagement to the Foun- 
dation of Christ-churche. EDWARD TERRY.* 
[July 17, Edward Bere, Student of Christ Church: June 17, 1648: I 
cannot without manifest breach of severall former oathes submitt to 
this Visitation. 
fJuly 31 st , Just as the Visitours came downe I fell sicke of an ague about 

1 f*Kf\ "1 

March 20, which held me in a very dangerous condicion above a 
Quarter of a yeare : So that when I came up againe the Visitours 
had ended all their Visitacion as farre as concerned the requiring 
(P. 71.) of Answers : But my actions since have showed that I did sub- 
mitte. July 3 1,1650: EDWARD BAGSHAWE. b 

May 11, 1648. The Answers of Queenes Colledge, May 11, 1648. 

Eobert Strange : Sirs : whereas you desire an Answere whether I 
intend to submitt to the Visitation. I am not of capacity to under- 
stand what it is, but will assure you in noe wise to oppose the 
power of Parliament. 

Geo: Longe : The Authority of Parliament I shall not oppose, 
but unto this Visitation with a saffe conscience I cannot submitt 
untill I am better satisfied. 

Tho: Barlow : I am not yet satisfied how I can without violence 
to my conscience submitt to this Visitation. 

Tho: Smith : What the power of the honorable Houses of Parlia- 
ment is, or how farre it extends, I professe unfainedly I doe not 
understand : And I hope my ignorance in a businesse of this nature 

a Edward Terry's repentance was so acceptable to his superiors that in Jan. 1649-50, 
he was elected Student " ex communi consensu," a rare distinction, Students being 
appointed by the nomination of the Dean and Canons in rotation. It will be seen 
that the Visitors insist on his having his full rights. 

b This seems to have been a sort of unofficial entry, interpolated at a much later 
date by favour of the " Register." 

c For Thomas Barlow see Introduction. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 75 

wilbe excused, it beinge (as I conceive) one of the highest poynts May n, ici 
of the law: As for this Visitation I shall not either oppose or 
declyne it, but shalbe ready when required to render an accompt n?. 72.) 
of my actions, and to Answere anythinge that shalbe laid to my 
charge. 

Thomas Tully : I shall with all readinesse and humility give the 
best accompt of actions I can, or any other satisfaction I lawfully 
may unto the Visitors of this Universitie appoynted by the honor- 
able Houses of Parliament. 

Tho: Turner I doe willingly acknowledge your power of the 
Visitation soe farre as this my acknowledgement may be lawfully 
consistent with those oathes I have formerly taken. 

Jo: Fisher : For the power of Parliament in its extent I doe 
conceive it a thinge of higher concernment then my capacity or 
judgement : For the Visitation it selfe I doe not declyne it, but 
shall willingly be accomptable for my actions beinge examined. 

James Fayre: The Question as I humbly conceive is very 
abstruse, ambiguous and difficult : for my part therefore I acknow- 
ledge that I am not able at present to satisfie my selfe how farre 
the authority of the honourable Houses of Parliament may extend, 
but as concerninge this Visitation I shall submitt soe farre to the 
same that I shall be ready to give accompt of my actions, or to 
Answere to any objections, or crymes exhibited against mee, when 
soever you shall be pleased to call upon mee. 

Mathew Hunter : The Question hath too much law in it for 
mee to understand it: And therefore I doubt not of soe much 
moderate equity from those who propose it, but that they will 
forbeare to urge an Answere there, where I am not wise enough to 
give one. 

James Buchanan : I am not convinced that this is a lawfull 
Visitation, and cannot therefore submitt untill I be better informed. 

Jo. Dobson : I am not now convinced in my conscience that you 
are lawfull Visitors. 

Francis Gibson : I know not how farre the power of Parliament 



76 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 11, ifi48. extends, and therefore for the present cannot submitt to this Visi- 
(P. 73.) tation. 

Kichard Fletcher : Truth it is I have never beene active against 
the Parliament, in all these sad and military tymes, yet I cannot for 
the present submitt to your Visitation, salva conscientia. 

William Preston : If it please you, Gentlemen, I cannot 
actively submitt to the Visitation salva conscientia : unlesse you 
will convince my slender judgement. 

Thomas Collinson : In all humilitie I reverence the authoritie 
of the two Howses of Parliament, and to whomsoever shalbe 
advancers of religion, and God's glory, I submit. 

Jo. Beebey : I shall very willingly submitt to this Visitation soe 
farre as lawfully I may. 

Tho. Nanson : I acknowledge the power of Parliament in this 
present Visitation, and submitt thereunto. 

Henry Walker : I acknowledge the power of Parliament in this 
present Visitation, and submitt thereto. 

Jo. Pierson : I am not sufficiently informed what your power of 
Parliament is, or how farre it extends, and hope that my ignorance 
(in a businesse of soe high a nature) may be my excuse : For this 
Visitation, I shall willingly submitt unto it, when it is made 
evident to my understandinge that such submission is noe violation 
of any oathes by mee formerly taken. 

Fran. Yonge : I may not safly submitt to the power of Parlia- 
ment in this Visitation, without further conviction. 

John Bell : I will submitt to the Order of Parliament as farre as 
lawfully I may : and when I am informed in my judgment. 

John Benne : As soone as I am informed in my judgment 1 
(P. 74.) will submitt to all Ordinances of Parliament. 

Andrew Whelpdall: My judgement at present beinge uncon- 
vinced of the lawfulnesse of this Visitation, I hope it wilbe 
candidely interpreted if 1 declyne a peremptory submission till 
cleare and satisfactory convictions, which when I shall once have, 
none shalbe more ready to submitt then Andrew Whelpdall. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 77 

Jacob Spencer : Sirs, to acknowledge the authoritie of Parliament May 11, 1648. 
in this Visitation, were to acknowledge you lawfull Visitors, and to 
acknowledge you lawfull Visitors were to say more then I know : 
and also to acknowledge many Visitors, whereas I can but acknow- 
ledge one. 

Samuell Heskines : I Samuell Heskines of Queenes Colledge doe 
acknowledge, and submitt unto the Ordinance of Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

Tho. Thorneton : Accordinge to that light which God hath given 
rnee, I can see noe reason why I may not lawfully submitt to the 
authority of Parliament and this Visitation, And therefore my 
Prayers shalbe to prosper in your hands this worke : a 

Avery Thompson : In all humility I reverence the authority of 
the 2 Houses of Parliament, or whomever shalbe the advancers of 
the glory of God. 

Christo: Harrison : What authority you have from the Parliament, 
or what authority they can give you for the Visitation of this Uni- 
versitie, exceeds my capacity : soe that I cannot submitt thereto till 
I be further informed therein : 

Chr. Wakefield : I cannot in conscience submitt unto this power. 

Hen. Lowcay: I cannot submitt to this Visitation, until! my (P. 75.) 
judgement be better informed. 

William Archard : Sirs, what authoritie the Parliament hath 
given you, or what authority they themselves have for the 
Visitinge of the Universitie, I am ignorant of: And for the 
present Visitation I cannot submitt, till my judgement is better 
informed. 

C. Higgs : I cannot submitt to the authoritie of this Visitation, 
because it is not throughly entred into my mynde whether it is a 
lawfull power. 

Rich. Lowe : I doe not rightly understand the businesse betweene 

a This cordial acceptance prepares us for the subsequent recommendation of Mr. 
Thornton by the Visitors for a Corpus Scholarship. 



78 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 11, 1648. the Universitie and your selves, therefore I humbly desire [you] 
not to presse mee further, for I cannot give a positive Answere. 

Nathaniell Noyse: I willingly submitt, and with great joy 
acknowledge the power and authority of this Visitation, the 
vindication of which hath to noe small malignity and opposition of 
those of the Colledge, whereof I am a member, rendred mee lyable. 

Hugh Meredith : Soe farre as I understand, there is a difference 
betweene you and the Universitie, which I am not capable of; and 
I doe not intend to engage my selfe in such businesse untill I am 
better informed. 

Christopher Musgreave : Till I am further satisfied I cannot with 
saffe conscience submitt to this Visitation. 

Jo: Baker: Sirs, I am not of ability to judge whether or noe this 
be a lawfull visitation ; therefore I thinke it not convenient for mee 
to submitt with a safle conscience to this Visitation untill I am 
further informed. 

Tho: Coleman : I doe humbly acknowledge the authoritie of the 
right honorable Houses of Parliament, and of you right Worshipfull 
as proceedinge from them in poynt of Visitation, and doe submitt 
unto it unfaynedly, and will further it as God shall enable me. 
(P. 76) Geo: Smith: Sirs, I cannot without further satisfaction submitt 

to the power of the Parliament in this present Visitation. 

Henry Huntly: As for the authority of Parliament I doe not 
understand, but I shall be willinge to give the best satisfaction, as 
lawfully I may to this Visitation. 

Geo: Farmer: I am ignorant both of the authority of Parliament, 
and the difference betweene the Universitie and yourselves; There- 
fore, as soone as I am otherwise informed in my understanding, as 
farre as lawfully I may, I will submitt, but before I cannot. 

Nicholas Pitt: To the pretended Visitors of this Universitie my 
Answere is negative, that I will not, neither can without abusinge 
the Kinge, and therein my owne conscience, submitt to you as 
Visitors, whom his Majestic doth professe his enemies: Thus stands 
the conscience of Nicholas Pitt. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 79 

John Fisher, his Answere, July 4 : May 11, 1648 

This is the Answere of mee, Jo: Fisher (Master of Arts and [July 4.] 
Chaplaine of Queenes Colledge), and which I shall acknowledge is 
myne: That I cannot without perjury submitt to this Visitation, 
and therefore I will not submitt. Ita est: 

Jo: FISHER. 

Interrogatories to be propounded to Mr. Chibnall, Burser Ma 7 12 > 1648. 

of Magdalen Colledge. 

1. Whether hee submitt to this Visitation? 

2. Whether hee submitt to the present Government of the Uni- 
versitie? 

3. Whether hee submitt to Dr. Wilkinson as President of Mag- 
dalen Colledge? 

4. Whether hee will deliver those things to Dr. Wilkinson which 
were required by the warrant of the 17 of Aprill? 

To the First hee Answers that he cannot submitt to the present 
Visitors because they are Clergle men, which is contrary to a- 
Statute of this present Parliament. 

To the 2 d hee desires tyme to Answere. 

To the 3 d hee Answers : That hee cannot submitt to Dr. Wilkin- 
son as President of Magd: Colledge because hee was not elected, 
admitted, nor sworne according to the Statutes of the said Colledge. 

To the 4 th hee saith hee cannot deliver those things mentioned 
in the Order, because hee is prohibited by the Statutes of the 
Colledge. 

An Order for restraynt of Mr. Chibnall, Batchlor in Divinity. May 12 th , 1648. 

Whereas Anthony Chibnall, Batchlor in Divinity, beinge sus- 
pended from his Fellowship and Bursershipp in Magdalen Colledge 
by an Order of the Chancellor and Visitors of this Universitie, 
bearinge date April 13, doth refuse to deliver up the Keyes and 
Bookes, beinge required by us the Visitors of this Universitie 



80 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 12, 16i8. accordinge to our Commission that such as areappoynted to receave 
the rents due to Magdalen Colledge may effectually receave them, 
accordinge to the Order of both Houses dated Ap. 21, 1648; and 
doth further refuse to submitt to the present Government, and Visi- 
tation of this Universitie : These are therefore to authorise you to 
(P. 79.) take into your custody the said Mr. Chibnall, and to detayne him 
in your hands untill hee give satisfaction to the Visitors, or the 
Visitors give further Order. 
To the Provost Marshall of the 
Garison of Oxon. a 

May 12. An Order for Mr. Unite, of Trinity Colledge. 

Whereas there is found in Trinity Colledge a Box of Plate (as is 
supposed) belonginge to the Colledge: These are from us (the 
Visitors of this Universitie) to authorise Mr. Unite, Fellow of Trinity 
Colledge, to take into his custody the said Box of Plate, and safely 
to keepe it in his hands till further Order given by the Visitors. b 

(P. 80.) The Answeres of the Fellowes, Schollers, &c., of Merton 

Ma ^ 12 ' 1648 ' Colledge. 

Bartholomew Grave : I submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

William Coxe : I submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

a Chibnall " remained a prisoner till Oct. 10 th following, and then, upon a bond 
of 200, he was released conditionally he make his appearance when he should be 
summoned by the Visitors." (Annals.) 

b It is curious that Wood (Annals) does not refer to this Order, in connection 
with the story he tells against Dr. Harris and his seizure of two bags of money found 
about the same time next year on pulling down some " old boards and shelves" at 
Trinity. Is it possible that the two accounts relate to the same treasure-trove ? 
There is no greater discrepancy between a "box" and "two bags covered with dust," 
than usually attends the " improvement" of a scandalous story. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 81 

Bassill Brent : I submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this May 12, 1648. 
Visitation. 

William Rider : I submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

George Lortt: I submitt to the authoritie of 
Parliament in this Visitation. 



Chaplaines : 



Henry Tonge: I have already (I suppose) sub- 



mitted in beinge obedient to the Commaund of our 
.Warden. 

Hen: Tonge : I doe acknowledge the power of Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

William Hill: I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

AndrewWoodley: I doe not understand the businesse, and there- 
fore am not able to give a direct Answere. 

Jo: French : I doe submitt to the Authority of Parliament in this 
Visitation, as I conceive I am concluded to doe by the Articles of 
Oxford.* 

Ralph Button : I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 5 

William Owen : I doe humbly conceive that I am not bound to 
submitt to the Visitation of the Visitors here present, beinge all men 
in holy Orders. 

Francis Brode : I cannot submitt. 

Ed: Copley: I doe submitt to the Authoritie of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

a This is the ex-Register; but he gradually relapses, for in Nov. 1649, he is one of 
the four Fellows of Merton, who, " according to the manner, with a Tertiavit, drank 
the King's health, standing bare" (see below, and the Annals). And on Jan. 22, 
1650, he is discovered to be guilty of drinking, swearing, and a "malignant spirit 
against the honest partie," so that he is at last expelled. He had evidently not 
been conciliated by the loss of his place. 

b Ralph Button having already taken such a prominent part in the Visitation, it 
must only have been by way of example to the others that he went through the form 
of submission. 

CAMD. SOC. M 



82 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 12, 1648. William Martin: I submitt to the authority of Parliament in this 

Visitation. 

(P. 81.) Richard Lydall : I suppose I have sufficiently submitted to the 

Visitation in acknowledginge Sir Nath: Brent as Warden of Merton 
Colledge, and in conforminge to the Directory accordinge to the 
commaund of the Parliament: And in what also shall concerne my 
particular, I shall further submitt. 

Jo. Leke: I cannot submitt to this Visitation (as I conceive) 
without manifest perjury. 

Rob. Bostocke: I cannot give a possitive Answere to this 
Question. 

Silvester Sweetsir : As it is from the Kinge and Parliament I doe 
submitt to this Visitation. 

Bryan Ambler : I cannot give a positive Answere to such a 
Question. 

(v. P. 86.) Richard Phillips : Because of my none insight into the nature 
of a Visitation, I am not able to give any positive Answere. a 

Jo. Blancks : I can give noe Answere to it. 

Richard Hodgekin : I Answere that I doe not throwly under- 
stand the Question, and therefore can give noe positive 
Answere. 

William Kemble : I doe submitt my selfe to this Visitation as 
farre as my conscience will give me leave. 

Samuell Jones: As farre forth as you have power from the 
Kinge, I doe submitt. 

Jo. Wright : That I am altogeather ignorant in matters of such 
high concernement : and am not able to Answere. 

Jo. Smart : I doe submitt to the Ordinance of Parliament for this 
Visitation. 

Tho. James: I submitt soe farre as I have power from the 
Kinge. 

B Richard Phillips recanted on the same day (p. 86), but was deprived of his 
Postmastership notwithstanding. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 83 

Nicholas Howson: I am not as yet informed how it can stand May 12, 1648. 
with my former oathes, soe often repeated to the Kinge, the Uni- (P. 82.) 
versitie, and my particular Colledge how I can submitt to this 
Visitation. 

Robert Sayer : I have as I conceive submitted sufficiently to the 
power of Parliament in this Visitation in obedience to Sir Nathaniell 
Brent, and conforminge to the Directory. And as 1 have, soe I shall 
in all things lawfull that shall concerne my perticular. 

Daniel Whistler : I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

N 

I submitt to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation. Mert: Coll: 

Jo. MARTIN. 

Forasmuch as Mr. Thomas Jones, Fellow of Merton Colledge, hath 
lately returned from travell, hath given in this his submission this 
6th of Aug. 1649: which is accordingly approved of: 

I Thomas Jones Master of Arts and fellow of Merton Colledge 
doe submitt to the Authority of Parliament in this present Visi- 
tation. 



An Order for Dr. Pellam, and Mr. Williamson to receave 
the Rents of Magdalen Colledge. 

Whereas Dr. Pellam, Mr. Williamson, and Mr. Dale, Junior: 
havinge submitted to this Visitation, and given satisfaction to the 
Visitors, are freed from the sentence of suspention given by the 
Lord Chancellor and Visitors against the Fellowes, and others of 
Magdalen Colledge : Dr. Wilkinson, President of Magdalen Colledge, 
with the consent of the Visitors, doth hereby appoynt Dr. Pellham 
and Mr. Williamson to receave all moneyes from Tenants, and others 
due to Magdallen Colledge by vertue of an Order of both Houses of 
Parliament, of A prill 21: 1648. Hereupon Mr. Chibnall, beinge 
suspended Aprill 13: is required to deliver such Registers and 



84 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Mny 12, 1648. Bookes as may enable the said Dr. Pellam and Mr. Williamson to 
receave the said moneyes unto them. 

By Order of the Visitors 

Ra: Austen: dep: reg: Com: a 

(P. 83) To this Mr. Chibnall Answeres : That beinge bound by the 

Statute of the Colledge, which hee is in conscience to conforme 
unto, hee cannot deliver the said Bookes, Registers, and other things 
unto the said Dr. Pellham, or Mr. Williamson. 

May 12 th . An Order that Mr. Wilkinson shall make a report of severall 

transactions concerninge the Visitation. 

Ordered that Mr. Wilkinson, one of our Fellow-Commissioners, be 
hereby desired to make a Report of our severall transactions, from 
the 21 : of Aprill, untill this 12: of May: unto the honorable Com- 
mittee of the Lords and Commons for the Reformation of Oxford, 
May 12: 1648. and to declare to them the whole state of our affaires, and represent 
our humble desires for the reformation and preservation of Oxford. 

Ordered that Mr. Wilkinson desire the Committee to resolve him 
in all doubtfull cases, whether the persons (whose severall con- 
ditionall and uncertaine Answeres are by us referred to severall and 
particular heads) are guilty of nonsubmissicn to the power of 
Parliament, and make his report accordingly. 6 

(P. 84.) The Answeres of Lincolne Colledge: May llth, 1648. 

Jo. Webberley: As fellow of Lincolne Colledge, inconsulto 

Rectore, et majore parte sociorum, I cannot Answere this Question. 

Jo. Kelham : I (not condemninge any of a different perswation) 

a This is Ralph Austen's first signature as Deputy Register to Newhonse, \vho 
was absent in London, " attending upon his master." Austen was of Magdalen 
College, and had been Proctor in 1630 (Annals). 

b For the answer of the Committee see p. 88. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 85 

Doe solemnely protest that I am not convinced in my judgement May 12, 1648. 
how I can safely submitt to this Visitation. 

Tha. Owen: I doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in C 1 ) 
this Visitation.* 

Kobert Steede : I doe submitt to this Visitation as agreeable to 
the lawes of the Kingedome. 

Drinkewater: I doe solemnely submitt to this present Visitation. (2) 
Jo. Quicke : I doe submitt. 
Lewis Roberts : I shall submitt to it. 

Samuell Dix : I Samuell Dix of Lincolne Colledge doe willingly 
submitt to and imbrase the Visitation performed by the Visitors 
authorised by the present Parliament. 

Sam. Edwards: I am firmely persuaded in conscience, that you 
the Commissioners in Parliament are lawfull Visitors of this Uni- 
versitie: To whose just authority I submitt: and am willinge to 
yield all lawfull obedience. 

Jo. Throughton: I think e in my conscience I may submitt to 
this Visitation concerninge my selfe livinge in the Universitie, as 
well as elswhere : 

Josiah Ballard: I acknowledge, and submitt to this present 
Visitation, in testimony whereof I subscribe my name 

Jo. BALLARD. 

Roger Hurrett : I should willingely submitt, had I power of ( p - 85> ) 
myselfe. 

Tho: Whitecombe: I doe acknowledge that the Parliament hath 
power to visite this Universitie. 

William Lewyn: I am not satisfied concerninge this Visitation, 
and in that respect I cannot submitt. 

Tho: Hanstead : I cannot submitt as I am a Member of Lincolne 
Colledge. 

Robert Jenckins: I willingely submitt to any Ordinance of Par- 
liament, and of those authorised by them. 

a Thankful Owen, one of the Delegates to the Visitors (p. 3) ; President of St. 
John's, 1650. 



86 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 12, 1648. Thomas Cracroft, Artium Magist: I doe conceive the Parliaments 
authority to be lawfull, and consequently doe acknowledge yours, 
and submitt to you as lawfull Visitors of this Universitie. 

Jo: Gilbert: I doe submitt to this Visitation, to extend soe farre 
as to purge my private manners, beinge a private Member of the 
Universitie. 

William Gough : I doe submitt to the Ordinance of Parliament 
for this Visitation. 

Huges: I not fully understandinge what this word Visitation 
meaneth, can in noe wise thereunto Submitt. 

Kobert Betton : I will submitt to your Visitation soe farre as my 
conscience gives me. leave. 

Charles Allman : Submission is yeilded unto this present (and as 
I suppose) lawfull Visitation^ by me Ch: Allman. 

William Austen : I doe willingely submitt my selfe to this pre- 
sent Visitation, as it is agreeable to the lawes of this Kingedome. 
(P. 86.) Henry Brady: I doe submitt to your authority in this Visitation. 

William Ettwall: I doe willingely submitt to this Visitation, 
graunted by the Lords and Commons of Parliament. 

Lincoln Coll. I Nicholas Hartwell, Member of Lincolne Colledge, doe most 
willingely submitt unto the honorable Visitors: and to this their 
present Visitation, as beinge authorised and instituted by Ordinance 
of Parliament for the Visitinge of the Universitie, hopinge for the 
prosperity and happie successe thereof. 

Merton Coll. Alexander Fisher: Fellow of Merton Colledge, I conceive the Par- 
liament of England hath power to visite the Universitie of Oxford, 
and therefore I submitt to their Visitation. 

I William Thomas, doe willingly and freely submitt unto this 
present Visitation, and.authoritie of Parliament therein. 

Merton Coll. I Ri : Phillipps doe submitt unto the authoritie of Parliament 
in this Visitation. 

The Answeres of the Members of Waddam Colledge. 
Lyonell Pine: Art: Mag: medic. Licenc: I hope noe man, since 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 87 

hee cannot finde in my life past whence to censure me, greedy to May 12, 1648. 
finde faults that hee will rake my owne brest to confesse that which 
noe man accuse me of, neither doe I myselfe yet know, viz: what 
I possibly shall doe hereafter this when I shall be commaunded 
that which I yet never heard of. 

Thomas Coward : If after more consideration I shall soe under- 
stand the meaninge of these words, The authoritie of Parliament, 
as thereby to cleare my unsatisfied conscience of some scruple : I 
shall then willingely subscribe to this Visitation. 

Tho: Leir: I acknowledge myselfe bound both by the lawes of 
God and man to be obedient to all just and lawfull authoritie. 

I acknowledge the Parliament power in this their present Re- Wadham Coll. 
formation of Oxon: and submitt to it. JONATHAN VAUGHAN. 

Gilbert Stookes : I doe submitt to the authoritie of the high Court (p. 87.) 
of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Robert Potter : I not able to judge of the authoritie of Parlia- 
ment, doe yet refuse to submitt to this Visitation. 

Hamlet Puleston: I have little knowledge in such affaires, yet 
(as I have heard) may submitt to noe Visitor, but the Bishopp of 
Bath and Wells : without the danger of incurringe perjury. 

Richard Crosheld: I neither may nor can submitt to this Visita- 
tion in respect of my conscience and oath of allegeance. 

Edward Davenant : Since that your power is graunted you only 
by vertue of an Ordinance of Parliament I cannot therefore with a 
saffe conscience submitt to this Visitation. 

George Davenant : If the authoritie of Parliament be grounded 
with the consent of the Kinge I will humbly submitt, if it be not, 
in conscience I cannot. 

George Chester : I will not submitt unto this Visitation unlesse 
it be derived from the power of the Kinge. 

Tho: Strade : If the authoritie of the Kinge be conjoyned with 
this authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation, I will willingely 
submitt unto it; if otherwise, I will in noe wise submitt. 

Joseph Sayer: I shall most willingely submitt to this Visitation, 



88 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 12, 1648. ordayned by Order of Parliament if it be joyned with that of the 
Kinge, otherwise I cannot with a saffe conscience. 

( p - 88 At a meeting of the Visitors the 12th of May, 1648. 

Whereas Mr. Pellam, Mr. Williamson, and Mr. Dale, Junior, 
Fellowes of Magdalen Colledge, have submitted to the authority of 
Parliament in this Visitation : 

It is ordered that the said Doctor Pellam, Mr. Williamson, and 
Mr. Dale, Junior, be released from that Submission in which they 
were involved by the Order of the Chancellor and Visitors, bearinge 
date the 13 of Aprill 1648, And therefore the said Dr. Pellam, Mr. 
Williamson, and Mr. Dale, Junior, may be admitted unto any 
Office in the Colledge aforesaid, whereof they are not uncapable by 
the Statutes of the said Colledge. 

May 12, 1648. 

Ordered that Mr. Chibnold be detayned in Custody till hee give 
satisfaction to the Visitors : 1 : Hee hath not submitted : 2 : Not 
delivered the Keyes: 3: The Order of Aprill 21 cannot be ob- 
served. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Keformation of 
(P. 120.) the Universitie of Oxford. May 15th, 1648. a 

Resolves. 

May 15, 1648. Resolved : 

Non-Sub- 1 : That profession of ignorance is not a Submission to the Power 

mission. o f Parliament. 

2 : That referringe to the Answere of the severall Houses is not a 

Submission. 
1 

a The Orders from the London Committee which here begin to appear from time 
to time will be placed according to their date among the Orders by Visitors. They 
could not of course have arrived on the day of their issue, but their connection with 
events will be far more easily understood when so placed than when entered with 
every possible irregularity as they are in the original, often weeks after they have 
been already dealt with by the Visitors. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 89 

3 : That they that say they cannot, they dare not, or doe not sub- May 15, 1648. 
mitt, without givinge a Reason, is not a Submission. 

4: That submitting to the authoritie of the kinge, and two 
Houses of Parliament, and soe farre as they have power from the 
kinge, and acknowledginge noe power but the kinge, and none 
without the kinge, is not a Submission. 

5 : That Submittinge under a Generall Condition, or soe farre as 
lawfully they may, or their consciences permitt, or when they shalbe 
satisfied, or their oathes permitt, is not a Submission. 

6. That they that refuse to Submitt to the Visitation, because 
the Visitors are Divines, is not a Submission. 

7. That they that deferre Submission upon generall reasons doe 
not Submitt. 

That Mr. How, of Christ Church, Mr. Owen, of Merton Colledge, Jo: 
Blanke, of Merton Colledge, Robert Kinge, of Brasen Nose, Lyonell 
Pine, of Wadham Colledge, Tho: Lees, George Bird, did not Submitt. 

May 15th, 1648. (P. 122.) 

The names of such Persons as have not submitted to the M 15tb 
Authoritie of Parliament in the Visitation, and are ex- 1648. 



pelled the University by the Committee of Lords and 

~. / f\ * i mission. 

Commons for regulating the University of Oxford : Expulsion. 

Line: Coll: Wm: Lewin. Qu: Coll: Andrew Whelpdale. 

Trin: Coll: Jo: Lydall. ,, Henry Lowcay. 

,, Bernard Banger. Ch: Musgrave. 

Jo: Pownall. ,, Geo: Smith. 

,, Phineas Jackson. Mag: Coll: William Hobbs. 

,, Joseph Jackson. Oriel: Coll: Jo: Rouse. 

,, Edmund Yonge. ,, John Buncombe. 

,, William Biner. Mag: Coll: Ed: Rogers. 

,, Wm. Hodges. Lanclett Lawe. 

,, Wm. Thomas. Wm: Coxe. 

Qu: Coll: Tho: Barlow. Hen: Clerke. 

,, Fran Yonge. ,, Tho: Peirce. 

CAMD. 8OC N 



90 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



May 15, 1648. Mag: Coll: Tho: Clutterbooke. 
N: Chyles. 

Josias Banger. 

,, Jo: Carpender. 

,, Hugh Holden. 

H: Yerbury. 

D: Capell. 

Andrew Searle. 
Allsoul : D r Martin Aleworth. 
Wadh: Coll: Tho. Coward. 
Line: Coll: D r Gilbert Watts. 
Pembr: Coll: Fran: Brickenden. 



Corpus Christi Coll: 
C. C. C. Tho: Drury. 

,, Hen: Button. 

,, Wm. Gedley. 

Wm. Lydall. 

,, Hen: Glover. 

,, Tim: Parker. 

Wm: Coldham. 

,, Rich: Warre. 

Jo: Betts. 

Tho: Teakle. 

,, William Fulman. 

,, James Metford. 

,, Tho: Johnson. 

,, Tho: Sanderson. 

Gamal: Clacson. 

Wm: Tonstall. 

Tim: Shute. 

(P. 123.) Alsouls Coll: Henry Barker. 
,, Jo: Middleton. 

Tho: Benell. 



Alsouls Coll : Geo: Stradlinge. 

Tho: Smith. 

Ch: Ch: Mr. Howe of Ch: Ch: 
Jo: Stanninough. 
,, Fran: Duncomb. 
,, R: Bryan. 
Merton Coll: R: Phillepps. 
Jo: Wright. 
Magd: Coll: Richard Zouch: a 
* youth. 

Lud: Mason: yonge. 
,, Jo: Wilcox. 
,, Wm. Sydenham. 
Rob: Johnson. 
,, Charles Brune, 

yonge. 
Thomas Hussy, 

yonge. 
3 , Jo: Kendall. 

Tho: Whikham. 
Wadh: Coll: Rich: Potter. 
Mag: Coll: Ed: Drope. 
Line: Coll: Ed: Hughes. 
Trin: Coll: Tho: Bryan. 
Alsouls: Tho: Smith. 
Line: Jo: Fisher. 
Queens Coll: James Fayrer. 
Math: Hunter. 
3 , Fran: Gibson. 

Jo: Pierson. 
,, Jacob Spenser. 
,, Chr: Harrison. 
Will: Archard. 
C: Higgs: 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



91 



Queens Coll : Kich: Love. 

,, Hugh Meredeth. 

Merton Coll: Jo: Blanke. 
Line: Coll: Jo: Webberley. 
Brasenose Coll: Ko: Kinge. 
Wadh: C: Lionell Pine. 
Tho: Peirce. 
Exet: Coll: Geo: Berd. 
Wadh: Coll: Geo: Ashwell. 

Jo: Dengley. 
Exeter C: Henry Tozer. 
Jo: Berry. 
Ho: Teigh. 
St. Johan: Coll: 
St. Jo: Nathan: Crowcher. 

Edwards, D r Medic: 1 

G: Gisby. 2 

Wm: Creed. 

,, Wm: Walwyn. 

Geo: Myller. 3 

Jo: Jemings. 4 

,, Wm: Coniars. 

,, Wm. Levens. 5 

,, Arth: Buckridge. 

,, Dav: Hitchins. 

Tho: Win ward. 

Nich: Violeit. 6 

Steven Pemple. 

Wm: Bell. 7 

,, James Davis. 

,, Mart: Hirst. 

,, Tho: Frewyn. 

Hen: Deighton. 
Will: Wright. 



St. Jo : Math: Randall. 
,, Jo: Blackman. 
Hen: Osbaston. 
Ch: Ch: Geo: Master. 

Lewys Palmer. 
Merton Coll: Franc: Broad. 
C. C. C. Jo: Fountaine. 
Brasen Nose: Jo: Newton. 
Exet: Coll: Jo: Vicars. 
Exet: Coll: Geo: Bull. 
3 , Jo: Hickins. 

Jo: Barbone. 

Tho: Clifford. 
Jo: Cutliffe. 

Tho: Carewe. 

William Morris. 

Line: Coll: Tho: Hansted. 
Qu: Coll: James Buchanan. 
N: Coll: Jo: Lucas. 

Anth: Robynson. 
M r Grabby. 
Jo: Warner. 
Ch: Ch: R: Whitehall. 
Sam: Jackson. 
,, Chris: Lowther. 
Fr. Farnaby. 



May 15, 1648. 



C. C. C. Geo: Stratford. 

Geo: Halsted. 

James Jackson. 

,, Ed: Eales. 

,, Hen: Glover. 

Rich: Warryn*. 

Jo: Stapleton, com r . 



(P. 124.) 



92 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



May 15, 1648. C. C. C. Jo: Better [or] Bettes. 

,, William Stampe. 

,, Jo: Jackson. 

Tho: Sanderson. 
Oriel Coll: Hen: Chamberlaine. 

John Duncombe. 

,, John Gardiner. 

New Coll: William Barker. 

Robt. Groves. 

,, John Beeseley. 

John Lamphire. 

Gil: Coles: 

H: Hobbes. 

Jo: Price. 

,, Ja: Tichburne. 

James Galey. 

,, Rich: Chamberlaine. 

,, Hen: Beiston. 

Merton Coll! Nich: Howson. 
Mag: Coll: J: Drake. 

,, Rich: Croshall. 

St. Johns: Ed. Slater. 
Ch: Ch: Jo: Fell. 

,, Rich: Allestree. 

,, John Dolben. a 

,, Blase Caryll. 
Mert: Coll: Robert Bostock. 
All Souls Coll: Hugh Boham. 



N: Coll: Jo: Geeres. 
,, Rich: Lydiat. 



N: Coll: Hen. Ayl worth. 

R. Rowlandson. 

Thorn: Alexander. 

,, Ralph Baynham. 

Anthony Robinson. 

3 , Jo: Dummier. 

Jo: Marshall. 

Th: Fooke. 

,, Th: Brickenden. 

Th: Gillingham. 

,, John Warner. 

,, Nic: Stanley. 

,, Robt: Bowman. 

,, John Barton. 

,, George Crack. 

,, Hen: Beiston. 

,, Christoph: Turpin. 

,, Ch: Trimnell. 

Rich: Osgood. 

,, Wm: Coles. 

,, Nich: Knowles. 
Ch: Ch: Jo: Aubrey. 
Mert: Coll: Jo: Lee. 
Oriell Coll: Sherington Sheldon. 
Mag: Coll: Walter Stonhouse. 
Franc: Drope. 

,, William Browne. 

Ch: Ch: Geo: Annesley. 
,, Giles Waring. 
,, Jam: Heath. 
Adam Litleton. 



(P. 



a John Dolben, D.D.: Bishop of Rochester, 1666; Archbishop of York, 1683; a 
distinguished Royalist soldier; associated with Fell and Allestree in keeping up the 
Church Services in Oxford during the Visitation. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



93 



Mert: Coll: Bryan Ambler. 
Oriel Coll: Kichard Sanders. 
Exet: Coll: John Bidgood. 
Ch: Ch: Fr: Chichester. 
N: Coll: Robert Wither. 

John Coles. 

R. Heigham. 

,, Charles Blunt. 

,, Ed d Rivers. 

Th: Grant. 

Rob: Mathewes. 

,, Hen: Bould. 

,, Gilberth Wither. 

John Hutton. 

,, Amb: Blake. 
C. C. C. George Kind. 

Th: Immings. 
Brasen: Coll: Ra: Houlton. 
Oriel: Coll: Nich: Brookes. 

,, Philip Bouch. 
Mag: Coll: Abrah m Forman. 

Edw: Exton. 
Wadh: Coll: Hamlet Pulixton. 
N: Coll: Th: Rivers. 

,, Rich. Hollo way. 

,, Hen: Complin. 
Ch: Ch: Th: Hill. 

,, Rich: Washburne. 

Th: Terrent. 

,, Ralph Townson. 

,, Jo: Berclay. 
,, George Smith. 
,, John Hilman. 
Ch: Bennell. 



Ch: Ch: Rob: Loe. May 15, 1648. 

Rich: Hodgskin. 
Mag: Coll: Miles Parry. 
,, Knowles. 
John Baker. 
Ch: Ch: P: Henry. 
Ric: Geale. 
,, Wm: Kemble. 
Brasen: Coll: Rich: Eude. 

,, Walter Whitney. 

Magd: Coll: Hugh Wilbrame. 
Trin: Coll: Ric: Stevens. 
Oriel Coll: Wm: Washburne. 
Allsoules: Jo: Prestwich. 
Johan: Tho: Ward. 
,, Jo: Speede. 
Jo: BeU. 

Mag: Coll: Anth: Chibnall. 
Oriel: Col: Rob: Say. 
Mag: Coll: William Collis 

,, Jo: Nurse. 
Line. Coll: Jo: Kelham. 

Wm: Preston. 
Ch: Ch: Walter Dayrell. 

Rich. Hill. 
Mert: Coll: Silvester Switsir. 
Wadh: Coll: Jo: Tregmor. 

,, Geo: Davenant. 

Ch: Ch: Fran: Dixon. 
,, Robert Hampton. 
Nath: Kellett. 
Mert: Coll: Sam: Jones. 
Qu: Coll: Hen: Huntley. 
C. C. C.: Zach: Bogan. 



94 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



May 15, 1648. Brasen: Coll: Byrom Eaton. 
,, Bad: Rawson. 

Jo: Broster. 

,, Peter Adams. 

Trin: Coll: Jo: Pate. 
Joh: Jo: Goad. 
Oriel Coll: Arth: Ackland. 
All Soules: L: Smith. 
Johan: Coll: William Morsse. 
Joh: Coll: Jo: Blagrave. 

,, Jo: Bent. 
Mert: Coll: Wm: Owen. 

Mag: Coll: Copinger. 

,, Tho: Hanbury. 
,, Doddingeton Clerk. 
Qu: Coll: Jo: Dobson. 

[Chr.] AVakefeild. 
Nic: Pitt. 
Ch: Ch: W m Richardson. 
Mert: Coll: Tho: James. 
Wadh: C: Ed: Davenant. 
Ch: Ch: Robert Whitehall. 
,, Hen: Gregory. 
,, Paul Skyott. 
Ed: Westfeild. 
Geo: Farmar. 



Ch: Ch: Rob: Jones. 
Brasen. Coll: Ric: Furnifall. 
Ric: Adams. 

,, Jo: Ashton. 

,, Jo: Smith. 

,, Tho: Jackson. 

Mag: C: Ralph Deane. 
Ric: Bartlett. 
Line: Coll: Robert Betton. 
Johan: Rob: Jennyngs. 
Queens: Tho: Turne. 

,, Wm: Bra we. 
Ch: Ch: Wm: Finmore. 
Mag: Coll: Ed: Phillips. 
,, Wm: Bayly. 

Wm: Webber. 

,, Ric: Fletcher. 

Ch: Ch: Jo: Caricke. 
N. Coll: Ja: Tichburne. 
Brasen. Coll: Th: Sixmith. 
Trin: Coll: Hen: Jackson. 
,, Sam: Jackson. 

Ch: Ch: Jo: Gardiner. 
,, Franc: Farnaby. 
Jam: Whaley. 
Edward Bere. 



May 15, 1648. 
(P. 127.) 



Maij 15 th 1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 

Universitie of Oxon. 
Resolved 

1. That these persons certified by the Visitors not to have sub- 
mitted to the authentic of Parliament in the Visitation shulbe 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 95 

removed, and deprived from their places in their respective Col- Ma 7 15 
ledges and Halls, and expelled from the Universitie of Oxford. 

2. That it be referred to the Visitors to cause this Order to be 
put in execution, and to desire the souldiery in Oxford to assist 
them therein if there shalbe occation. 

FRANCIS Rous. 
Concordat cum originali : 
RA: AUSTEN. 



Interrogatories put to John Duncombe, Esqr. by the Commis- (p. 89.) 
sioners of Parliament for the Regulatinge of the Uni- 
versitie of Oxford. 

May 16, 1648. May 16f 1648 . 

1. Doe you submitt to the Authoritie of Parliament in this 
Visitation ? 

2. When were you first chosen to be Clericus Computi for 
Magdalen Colledge? 

3. Did you not keepe a Court at Sambourne in the name of Dr. 
Jo. Oliver, as President of Magdalen Colledge upon the 18 of 
Aprill, 1048: and at Scale the 24th of the same month? 

4. Did you not assist Mr. Dale in keepinge of Courts, lettinge 
Coppyholds, and Collectinge of Rents, and what Copyholds were lett, 
or Indentures made this progresse? 

5. Was the President or Vice -President of Magdalen Colledge, 
present with you when you assisted Mr. Dale in Sussex? 

6. Did you not assist Mr. Dale at Sheete and Petersfield in Hamp- 
shire, after the Order of the Chancellor and Visitors, bearinge date* 
Aprill 13 last past, was made knowne unto you? 

7. Have you executed your Office in a way subordinate to the 
authoritie of Parliament in your late progresse? 

8. Have you in your Custodie the key of the Cheq r of this 
Colledge? 



96 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 16, 1648. 9. Doe you not know of the disposall of the moneyes receaved for 
Magdalen Colledge in this progresse? 



(P. 90.) The Answere of John Duncomb, Esq r to the for esaid Interrogatories, 

May 16, 1648. 

1. To the 1, hee saith: That in his conscience and in his opinion 
by lawe, hee cannot submitt to this Visitation. 

2. To the 2, hee saith : That hee was chosen Steward, or Clericus 
Computi, to Magdalen Colledge, about 2 years since, and that the 
direct tyme will appeare in the Colledge Kegister, and beinge 
further asked how longe it was after the surrender of Oxford, hee 
saith that hee was chosen and sworne before the said surrender. 

3. To the 3 a , he Answers affirmatively, and that hee did not then 
know that Dr. Oliver was ejected, or Dr. Wilkinson established by 
authority of Parliament, in the place of President of Magdalen 
Colledge. 

4. To the 4 th , he saith: That hee did keepe Courts as Steward, 
but did not receave Rents, nor assist Mr. Dale in receivinge of them. 
That there were noe Indentures made, but that some Coppiholds 
were lett, which what they were hee referres himselfe unto the 
Papers now out of his hands, and taken from him. 

5. To the 5, he saith: That neither President nor Vice- 
President were present when hee assisted Mr. Dale in Sussex : but 
that Mr. President was gonne away before at Sam borne in Hampt- 
shire. 

6. To the 6, hee saith: That after the said order was made 
knowne unto him at Findon in Sussex, on the 25 of Aprill, hee 
was with Mr. Dale at Petersfield, but that hee saw noe money paid, 
nor receaved, neither did assist him. 

7. To the 7th, hee doth answere affirmatively: and it beinge 
objected that hee did act contrary to the Order of Aprill 13, hee 
said, that he did act nothinge as steward after that Order was 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 97 

shew'd him at Findon in Sussex, and made all the hast hee could to May 16, 1648. 
Oxford. 

8. To the 8, hee saith: That hee hath not, nor ever hath had, the (P 91.) 
custody of that key, but when ever hee had occation to use it hee 

did after retourne it to Mr. President. 

9. To the 9 th , hee saith : That hee doth not know any thinge of it. 

JOHN DUNCOMB. 

The Answeres of some Members of Magdalen Colledge, who May 17, 1648. 
appeared not upon former Summons. 

Henry Jones: I cannot submitt with a saffe conscience to this 
Visitation. 

James Browne: As for the Visitation in generall as touchinge 
the Universitie, what the Convocation agreed to in the Reasons is 
my Answere : in perticuler concerninge the Colledge, I can acknow- 
ledge noe Visitor but the Bishop of Winchester without perjury. 

William White: The Question concerninge submittinge to the 
present Visitation I dare not directly Answere without further 
advisement. 

William Gardener: I cannot submitt to this Visitation. 

Hugh Phillips: Chorister and but a Schooleboy 14 yeare old: 
I confesse that I am not scholler sufficient to give an Answere to 
this Question propounded. 3 

John Tayleur: There beinge, as I conceive, many difficult 
questions, not as yet resolved, which I might necessarily affirme or 
deny, with this one now put: Therefore until I can be satisfied in 
those, I cannot Answere to this without great danger of ensnaringe ^ ' 
my conscience. 

Anthonj Stephens : I doe submitt unto authority of Parliament, 
and to the present visitation of the Universitie of Oxford. 

William Dureton, Clericus: Bacc: Art: By non-submission to 
this method of Visitation I shall, I feare, nawfragrate the present 

a Nevertheless lie is one of those ordered to be expelled (p 144). 
CAMD. SOC. O 



98 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



May 17, 1648. subsistance I now enjoy, which is all I have in the world: But if 1 
doe submitt, it beinge both repugnant to ray practieall judgement and 
contradictory to the many oathes I have taken in the Universitie, 
I shall, I feare, beinge not yet absolv'd, incurre that damnable sin of 
perjury, a sad dilemma, but yet I resolve to observe that Apho- 
risticall Edict, Ex duobus malis minimum eligendum. 

Ralphe Deane, A: Bacc: Demy : I cannot submitt to this Visita- 
tion, because the Statutes of the House otherwise oblige me. 

Tho. Home, Chorister: I am ignorant how farre the power of 
the Parliament extended in the Visitation, therefore for the present 
desire to be . excused : I acknowledge the Visitation as it cometh 
from the Kinge and Parliament, otherwise I cannot conscionably 
submitt to it. 

Humfrey Simpson : Chorister : Your Question is too obscure for 
me to answere, but howsoever I cannot submitt to the Visitation. 

Tho: Hawton: Usher of the Free Schoole: I doe submitt. 

Daniell Jones, Chiefe Buttler: I must and doe submitt to the 
authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Christ : Taylor : Second Buttler: These are Matters beyond my 
capacitie to Answere, and not able to resolve. 

William Hearne ; Second Cooke : My conscience will not allow 
mee to con forme myselfe to this Visitation. 

Jo : Tutchin : Junior Butler : I Jo: Tutchin to this Question am 
not able to resolve. 

(P. 93.) Kichard Prickett, Barbor in Magdalen Colledge: I submitt to the 

power of Kinge and Parliament: And am willinge to please Doctor 
Wilkinson in what I may. 



Magd: Colt 



(P. 94). 



The Answeres of the Members of Jesus Colledge 
May 18: 1648. 



Thomas Wilkines: In civilitie, and with all faire respects as unto 
private Gentlemen, I returne you myne Answere : I cannot submitt 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 99 

to your Visitation, without betrayinge the Ma y 18 16 ' i8 - 

j j Prerogative n Pater Patriaj, the Kinge: 

{ Priviledge C ^ Alma Mater, the Universitie: 

The which I neither ought nor will doe. 

John Hughes : Seeinge I have not soe large a conscience as to 
entertaine everie cruditie of Doctrine: Bee it knowne unto you, 
that I will not (were it to save my life) nor can as a member of this 
Universitie, or as a Student of Jesus Colledge, acknowledge this 
present Parliament, much lesse submitt thereto, nor to your pre- 
tended authoritie, as derived from them. 

William Price : Whereas this Visitation is not authorised by his 
Majestic, I ought not to acknowledge the same, therefore as I 
cannot without prejudice to my conscience, soe I will not submitt 
thereto. 

Andrew Savage : I doe not submitt to this Visitation : 

Tho: Morgan: I doe not submitt to this Visitation. 

Whitegift Gibbons : I doe not submitt to this Visitation : 

Phillipp Flower: I dare not condemne my selfe to receive a 
portion with hypocritte in yeldinge upp (as I cannot obtaine 
sufficient reasons yet to judge otherwise) my conscience and right - 
full liberties, to the present demanders of my submission. 

Whitegifte Gibbons : I doe not submitt to this Visitation. 

William Wilkines : To this Visitation I will not submitt : 

Humfrey Boulton: I doe beleeve, and in conscience am perswaded, (P. 95.) 
that I neither ought, nor can, neither as Member of the Universitie, 
or of Jesus Colledge, submitt to this present pretended, power of 
Visitation, not beinge derived from the Kinge. 

Tho: Ellis : After a seriouse and diligent consultation had with 
my owne Conscience, I have at length pitched upon this resolution : 
That I cannot submitt to this your Visitation, without the hazard of 
shipwrackinge of my soule : how pretiouse a thinge that is to everie 
man, I neede not insist to tell you : I beseech God the Father of 
Mercies to strengthen mee with his grace for the mentayninge of a 
good conscience while I am THO. ELLIS. 



100 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 18, 1648. Lewis Williams: I doe not submitt: 

James Penry : I say I cannot, nor with a saffe conscience will 
submitt to your Visitation, were it to save my life. 

William Parry : As I am a member of this Universitie, I cannot 
nor will submitt to this Visitation, denying their power without the 
Kinge. I say: J. W. PARRY. 

Theodorett Bassett: I am resolved, and in conscience fully satis- 
fied, that I neither can, nor ought, either as Member of the Uni- 
versitie, or of Jesus Colledge submitt to this your pretended power 
of Visitation: not beinge derived from the Kinge, 

Geo: Evans : I am perswaded that I cannot in conscience submitt 
to this Visitation : the Visitors not derivinge their power from the 
Kinge. 

James Quarrell : I who am a Member of this Universitie and of 
Jesus Colledge, doe beleeve that I ought not, neither can I with a 
saffe conscience, submitt to this Visitation. 

Peter Meyricke : I cannot with a saffe conscience, neither will I 
upon any condition, submitt to this Visitation, beinge the authoritie 
thereof is not derived from his Majestie. 

I James Vaughan, Fellow of Jesus Colledge, am not otherwise 
Jesus Coll- convinced in judgement then to conceive this Visitation legall, and 

Oct: y e 11 th , therefore doe submitt to the present Visitors. 
1648. 

At a meetinge of the Visitors this 18: of May : 1648: 

(P. 93.) ; These are to authorise you to take into your custody the body of 
John Hughes, a and him safely to keepe untill hee be delivered by 
Order of Law, And for soe doinge this shalbe your sufficient 
warrant. 

To the Provost Marshall 
of the Garison of Oxon. 

a Perhaps for some special vehemence of demeanour; for, outspoken and defiant 
as his answer is, it is scarcely more so than those given at this time by the rest of 
the College. See Introduction. There were other fellows and scholars who refused 
to submit, besides those entered in this place ; but more seem to have submitted 
than Sir Leoline Jenkins supposed. (See Life of Mansell). 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 101 



The Answeres of the members of Baylioll Colledge, May 18 1648> 

May 18: 1648. (P. 96.) 

Robert Feildinge : Havinge scene the Reasons of the Uni- 
versitie, to which I have had noe satisfactorie Answere, I cannot 
submitt. 

Richard Herbert : I dare not submitt to this present Visitation. 

James Pitt : Till I am further satisfied I cannot submitt. 

Hopton Throckmorton : My answere is that the Visitation of this 
Universitie, is a prerogative of the Kinge's, and therefore I cannot 
submitt unto any but him, or others approved of and authorised by 
him. 

Tho: Clement: I cannot with a saffe Conscience submitt to this 
Visitation, beinge it is not imediately derived from the authority 
of the Kinge and Parliament. 

Robert Hawkines: I cannot in conscience submitt to this Visita- 
tion, untill the Reasons proposed by the Delegates of the Univer- 
sitie be fully Answered. 

Jo. Fifeild : The Reasons given by some of the Universitie 
beinge as yet unsatisfied, I cannott submitt to this Visitation, without 
prejudice to my conscience. 

Timothy Clarke : I cannot till I be better satisfied with the ( p - 97> ) 
legalitie of your power submitt. 

Tho. Carelesse : I cannot in conscience submitt to the authoritie 
of the Lords and Commons (assembled in Parliament) in this Visi- 
tation. 

M. Herbert: I cannot in conscience submitt to this present 
Visitation. 

Fran: Fitherbert: I conceive I ought not in conscience to submitt 
to this Visitation. 

Jo. Evans: Havinge scene the Reasons of the Universitie I 
cannot, without further satisfaction, with a saffe conscience submitt 
to this Visitation. 



102 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 18, 1648. Jo. Petty : I referre my selfe to the Answere presented unto you 
by the Delegates in the name of the Universitie. 

Eich. Bennett: I acknowledge this to be a la wfull Visitation, 
unto which I submitt. 

T. Walker: I subscribe to the Ordinance of Parliament con- 
cerninge the Visitation now at Oxon : 

Richard Smith, Cooke of Balioll Colledge : I humbly submitt to 
the authoritie of Parliament in this present Visitation.* 



(P. 98). The Answeres of the Members of Universitie Colledge : 

May 18 : 1648. 

Richard Washingeton : I doe freely and conscientiousely submitt 
my selfe to this Visitation, authorised by Parliament, as I thinke I 
ought to doe, and as I have donne formerly in another kingedome to 
a like Visitation sent from the Parliament there, to the Colledge 
where I then lived. b 

William Woodward : I doe submitt to the power of Parliament 
in poynt of Visitation. 

a Wood, we see, is inaccurate here in asserting of Balliol that " not one except the 
cook submitted." (Annals). 

b The " kingdom " here referred to is Ireland. Washington, having been a Fellow 
of University, had become Provost of Trinity College, Dublin, from whence he 
retired when the Irish rebellion broke out, and was re-admitted to his fellowship at 
University College. " He was the only man of the old stock left therein " at this 
period (Fasti, i. 469). He was one of the twenty Delegates now appointed, May 19, 
by the Proctors, quorum vel major pars vel ad minimum ex iu decent deliberent 
et statuant et in nomine Universitatis respondeant in universum de omnitug 
qua ad rem Academic publicam pertinent. They are not printed by Wood ; 
but, as they may be considered the leading men of the University at this time, 
their names are worth extracting from Reg. Con voc. T. They are as follows: 
Doctors : Harris, Corbett, Pelham, Vivian, and Palmer. Masters: Williamson, 
Washington, Mills, Pocock, Greenwood, Wilkinson, Cheynell, Sparkes, Cornish, 
Langley, Wilkins, Copley, Owen, Clifford, Martin, together with the Vice Chan- 
cellor and Proctors. Washington died in 1651. See below. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



103 



Ralph Kyner : I doe submitt to the power of the Parliament May 18, 1G48. 
in poynt of Visitation. 

Obadia Walker : I am not yet satisfied that I may submitt to this 
Visitation. 3 

Henry Watkines : I cannot satisfie my selfe in regard of my 
former oathes, how I can safely make Answere to the Question 
proposed. 

Walter James : I cannot for my conscience sake submitt to this 
Visitation. 

Tho. Silvester : I beinge not satisfied with the lawfulnesse of this 
Visitation, cannot submitt thereunto. 

John Hill : I doe freely and conscientiousely submitt my selfe to 
this Visitation authorised by Parliament as I thinke I ought to doe, 
and as I have alwayes donne. 

I doe hereby acknowledge and submitt to the authoritie of Universitie 
Parliament in this present Visitation of the Universitie of Oxon. ^ 
Aug. 1: 1648. Jo. WALKER. 



1: 

These submitt to K: 

and Parliament. 
Thomas Home, Mag: Coll: 
Humphrey Boulton, Je: Coll: 
William Parres, ,, 

Thodorett Bassett, ,, 
Geo: Evans, ,, 

Peter Meyrick, ,, 

William Price, ,, 

Hopton Throckmorton, Bat: 
Tho: Clement, Bat: Coll: 



These deferre their submis- 
sion upon severall reasons, 
and desire tyme as beinge 
yet unsatisfied: 
Jo: Taylor, Magd: Coll: 
William White, Ludimagist. 
Obadiah Walker, University Coll 
Hen: Watkines, ,, ,, 

Tymothy Clarke, Bal: Coll: 
James Pitt, ,, 



(P. 104.) 
May 19, 1648. 



a The Master of his College at a later date, when it was sung in the streets" Old 
Obadiah sings Avc-maria." He had no scruples about the " Visitation" of James II. 



104 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 19, 1618. 3: William Wilkines, Je: Coll: 

These doe not submitt, or Tho: Wilkines, 

dare not, or cannot, or will Andrew Savage, ,, 

not, or ought not, because Tho: Morgan, 

of Perjury, and Statutes, Whitegift Gibbons, 

and Conscience: Tho: Silvester, Universitie Coll: 

William Dureton, Cleric: Magd: Henry Watkines, ,, 

Coll: Walter James, ,, 

Kalph Deane, Magd: demy: Bacc: Timo: Clerke, Bat. Coll. 

Henry Jones, Magd: Coll: Tho: Carelesse, ,, 

William Gardner, Commoner. Fitz Herbert, ,, 

Thomas Ellis, Jesus Coll: Kichard Harbert, ,, 

Lewys Williams, ,, James Pitt, 

James Penry, ,, Ed: Morgan, ,, 

James Quarrell, ,, 

4: 

These referre to the Delegates' Answere and Universitie Seasons : 
Jo: Evans, Bah Coll: 
Jo: Petty, ,, 

Ko: Feildinge, 
Robert Hawkines, 
Jo: Atfield, ,, 

(P. 105.) Mr. Flower's Answere to be represented in his owne words. 

Ma US i9l648 John Hughes' Answere to be represented in his owne words: 

These whose names are written in this paper, have appeared 
since Mr. Wilkinson went to London. Wee have reduced their 
Answeres to such heads as the Committee of Lords and Commons 
have voted to signifie Non-submission, and accordingely present 
them: 

Edward Reynolds. Christopher Rogers. 

John Wilkinson. Francis Cheynell. 

Robert Harris. 

May 19 th 1648. 
(P. 100.) I received 3 severall Orders : one concerninge the Margaret 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 105 

Lecture, another about St. John's Headship, a 3 d about the revenues May 19, 1648. 
of the Mathematical! Lectures. 8 

FR. CHEYNELL. 

May 19, 48. 

I receaved 3 severall Orders touching Trinity Colledg: for the 
outing of doctor Potter and the admitting of my selffe. 

ROBERT HARRIS. 

I received 2 severall Orders : one concerninge Dr. Oliver's 
removeall ; the 2 nd concernes the establishment of the presidentshippe. 

J. WILKINSON. 

May 22, 1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons, &c., Resolved: 
That John Hughes be removed from Jesus Colledge and expelled 
from the University of Oxford for his high contempt of the 
authority of Parliament. 

FR. Rons. 

Mr. Roberts, b Master of ) , 
Jesus Colledge j May 22M648. (P. *) 

* 

At the Committee of Lordes and Commons for the 
Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Whereas it appeared to this Committee, and accordingly was 
resolved, that Dr. Francis Mansell was guilty of high contempt and 
denyall of authority of Parliament, and for an effectuall remedy 
thereof it was alsoe resolved that the said Dr. Mansell bee removed 

a The Lady Margaret Lecture in succession to Dr. Lawrence, "Master of Balliol ; 
the Presidentship of St. John's, in succession to Dr. Baylie. The revenues of the 
Mathematical Lectureship were probably given him temporarily to eke out that of 
the Headship, which was very poor, and in aid of which a part of Sir W. Paddy's 
bequest was afterwards applied. 

b For Michael Roberts see note below, and Introduction. 

For Dr. Mansell see note below, and Introduction. 

CAMD 8OC P 



106 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 19, 1648. from being Principall of Jesus Colledge, in the Universitie of 
Oxford: and that Mr. Michaell Roberts, Batchelor in Divinity, be 
Principall of the said Colledge: It is therefore ordered That the 
said Mr. Roberts, be, and hereby he is constituted and established 
Principall of the said Colledge to all intents and purposes, and shall 
enjoy and have all the power, rights, emoluments, roomes, and 
lodgings by any Statute, custome, or right belonging to the 
Principall of the said Colledge: And the Senior Fellow in the said 
Colledge is hereby required to publish this Order to the fellowes, 
sch oilers, and others of the said Colledge who are or may be con- 
cerned in the knowledg hereof. And the fellowes, schollers and 
others of the said Colledge are hereby required to receive, respect, 
obey, and submitt to the said Mr. Michaell Roberts, as Principall of 
that Colledge : as they will answere the contrary at their perills, 
And that the former Order of this Committee for removing: Dr. 

O 

Mansell, and this Order for establishing Mr. Roberts Principall 
of the said Colledge, be entered into the Register of the said 
Colledge. 

FRAN: RODS. 

May 22, 1648. The names of divers others who have Non- Submission, 
(P. 136.) no t as y e t submitted to the Visita- Expulsion, 

tion, as appeares by their severall May 22 d , 

answeres above- written. 1648. 

Obadiah Walker, Univer: Franc: Fitzherbert, Baliol. 

Henry Watkins, ,, Richard Herbert, 

Thomas Sylvester, ,, Edward Morgan, ,, 

Walter James, ,, John Evans, ,, 

Hopton Throckmorton, Baliol. Jo: Petty, ,, 

Thomas Clement, ,, Robert Feildinge, ,, 

Tymothy Clearke, ,, Robert Hawkins, 

James Pitt, ,, John Fifeild, ,, 

Thomas Carelesse, ,, John Hughes, Jes: Coll. 

Matthew Herbert, ,, Phillipp Flower, ,, 



THE VISITORS HEGISTEU. 



107 



Whitegift Gibbons, Jes: Coll. 

Thomas Morgan, ,, 

Andrew Suvage, ,, 

Wm: Wilkins, ,, 

James Quarrell, ,, 

James Penry, ,, 

Lewys Williams, ,, 
Tho: Ellis, 

William Price, ,, 

Peter Meyricke, ,, 

Gco: Evans, ,, ^ 

Theodorett Bassett, 

Win: Parrs, ,, 



Humphrey Bolton, Jes: Coll. 
Jo: Duncombe, Mag. Coll. 

Wm: Gardiner, ,, 

Henry Jones, ,, 

Raphe Deane, ,, 

Wm: Dureton, ,, 

Jo: Taylor, Bursar, 
Humphrey Simson, ,, 

Tho: Home, ,, 

James Browne, 

Tho: Wilkins, Jes: Coll. 

William White, 



May 22, 1G1S. 



At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the May 22, 1648. 
Universitie of Oxon. 

Upon hearinge the Report of Mr. Henry Wilkinson from the 
Commissioners of the Universitie of Oxford touchinge sundry 
schollars and others whose names are above written, who are 
certified by them to this Committee not to have submitted to the 
authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation, it is ordered, that the 
said persons thus certified be removed and deprived from their 
places in their respective Colledges and expelled from the Uni- 
versitie. FRAN: ROUSE. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of May 22, 1648. 
the Universitie of Oxon. ( p - 

Resolved, 

That the raoneyes receaved by the Bursars of such Colledges 
wherein the Parliament hath placed new Heads shall bee delivered 
to such Heads, or such whom they shall appoynt to receave it. 

FRANCIS Rons. 
Concordat cum Originali : RA : AUSTEN. 



108 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 22, 1648. Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxofi. 
Resolved, 

As the Judgement of this Committee, That the Heads of Houses 
placed by authority of Parliament have power to enter into any 
roomes in their respective Colledges where any of the Colledge 
goods or records are, or should bee. FRANCIS Rous. 

May 22, 1648. ^tt tne Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxon. 
Resolved, 

That the Visitors be desired to looke to the right disposinge of 
the moneyes receaved by the Bursars or others of the respective 
Colledges, and to the securinge of the goods of the Colledges. 

FRANCIS Rous. 

[By the Visitors.] 

May 23, 1648. An Order prohibitinge the sale of Wood belonginge to 

(P. 100.) Alsoules Colledge. 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxofi, hereby require 
you stricktly to prohibite and hinder the cuttinge, sellinge, and 
carryinge away of any wood or underwoods belonginge to Alsoules 
Colledge in Oxon upon any pretence whatsoever, and to retourne 
the names of such as presume to cutt, sell, or carrie away any 
woods, or lycence any person or persons to carrie away any woods 
(that is already cutt), unto us the Visitors of the Universitie afore- 
said, and also to pay all such moneyes as you have already receaved 
for wood belonginge to the said Colledge unto Dr. Palmer, now 
Warden of the Colledge aforesaid ; and hereof you are not to faile, 
as you will Answere the contrary at your perill. 

To the Woodmane and Baleffes and all such as are intrusted 
with the preservation of the woods belonginge to Alsoules 
Colledge, in Oxofi. 

(P. 101.) Bernard Banger, of Trinitie Colledge: Beinge asked whether I 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 109 

would submitt to the power of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and May 23, 1648. 
Proctors authorised by Parliament for the regulation of this Uni- 
versitie : My Answere is that I am not satisfied how farre I may 
submitt. 

Beinge asked whether I would submitt to D r Harris as President : 
My Answere is, that I desire to see the Statutes first. 

S r Salmon's Answere, of Trinitie Colledge : 

My Answere is, that I have scene and perused the Reasons of the 
Universitie, and could never see any satisfactory Answere to them, 
and therefore I cannot submitt. ED: SALMON. 

As it is a consequent of the Visitation, I am not satisfied how I 
may submitt to them. 

I am not satisfied how I may doe that neither. 

ED: SALMON. 

Tho: Welsh: Cooke: Trin: Coll: 

I doe submitt to the power of Parliament. 

In the case of Mr. Hughes, of Jesus Colledge, it is left to the May 24, 1648. 
Provice Chancellor to doe as hee sees cause. (P- 102.) 

Present of the Visitors: 

The Vice-Chancellor. Dr. Rogers. 
Dr. "Wilkinson. Mr. Cheynell. 

Dr. Harris. 

An Order for Mr. Clerke, of Enston, Tenant of Christ Church. 

Whereas the Petition of Mr. Jo: Clerke was, by order of the 
honorable Committee of Lords and Commons for reformation of 
the Universitie of Oxon, bearinge date May 23 d , 1648, referred to 
us the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, to doe therein as wee 
should see cause for the releife of the Petitioner aforesaid. In 
obedience to the said Order wee humbly certifie that wee conceive 
the person unto whose use and benifite the Rectorie of Enston was 
sequestred is to pay all arreers due to the Deane and Chapter of 
Christ Church duringe the said sequestration, and not Mr. Clerke, 



110 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 24, 1G48. from whom it was sequestred, for his good affection to the Parlia- 
ment, to his great prejudice and detriment, and therefore wee are 
bould to recommend his sad condition to such persons of honour as are 
authorised to releeve all distressed persons in cases of like nature. 

(P. 106.) Questions proposed to Mr. Boulds, of Pembrooke Colledge. 

1. Doe you submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this 
Visitation. 

2. Doe you submitt to the present Government of this Universitie 
by the Chancellor, Vice-Ohancellor, and Proctors established by 
the imediate authoritie of both Houses of Parliament. 

3. Doe you submitt to Mr. Langley as Master of Pembrooke 
Colledge. 

4. Doe you observe the Directory in all the publique excercises 
of religion in your parish. 

The Answere of Mr. Boulds. 

I cannot submitt to this Visitation, but only to the power of his 
Majestie in generall and of our lawfull Visitor in perticuler, which 
is accordinge to our Statutes, unto which I aui sworne, besides I 
doe not heare of any satisfactory Answere given to the Reasons of 
this Universitie. 

As concerninge the Directory, I did use it, and was inforced 
upon my conscience to use againe the Booke of Common Prayer, 
or els I had lost the major part of my parish. 

To the 2 d : I, John Boulds, doe referre myselfe to the Answere 
of the Universitie. Jo : BOLDS. 

(P. 107.) Magdalene Colledge, May 25, 1648. 

Mr. Henry Wilkinson, 3 Batchelor of Divinity, is elected Fellow 
and Vice- President of Magdalene Colledge in the place of Mr. 

a This is Henry Wilkinson, junior, who is generally distinguished by the name of 
" Dean Harry " from Henry Wilkinson, senior, " Long Harry," the more prominent 
and important of the two, Canon of Christchurch, and Margaret Professor of 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. Ill 

Chibnold, and office of Mr. Parkhurst, by the President of the sayd May 25, 1648. 
Colledge, with consent of the Visitours. 

Mr. Vice-Chauncellour, Dr. Wilkinson, Dr. Harris, Dr. Rogers, 
Mr. Cheynell, being present. 

May 26, 1648. 

This day a Summons was sent to Mr. Howe, Mr. Hawes, Mr. 
Batthurst, Mr. Skinner, Fellowes of Trinitie Coll: to appeare before 
the Provice-Chancellor on the 1 of June, upon payne of expulsion. 

Also a Summons to Dr. Saunders to give in his Answere on the 
29th of May. 

ELECTION. 

An Order Prohibitinge an Election in Trinitie Coll : May 26, 1648. 

Whereas the election of all Fellowes and Scholars of Trinitie 
Colledge is by spetiall Order of the Lords and Commons assembled 
in Parliament, recommended to the care, and left to the power of 
Dr. Harris, President of the said Colledge and the Visitors of the 
Universitie. These are to inhibite and forbid all and everie Fellow 
of Trinitie Colledge from assemblinge togeather to make any 
Election of any Fellow or Fellowes, Scholar or Scholars of the said 
Colledge upon any plea or pretence whatsoever, upon paine of 
expulsion. 

May 26, 1648. Magdalen Coll: 

This day Mr. Latimer Crosse was elected Steward of Magdalen 
Colledge by the President, with consent of the Visitors, in the 
place of Mr. Duncombe; the said Mr. Duncombe beinge deprived 

Divinity. " Dean Harry," here made Fellow of Magdalen, becomes Principal of 
Magdalen Hall at this period. Neal, in his History of the Puritans, has confused 
the two Henry Wilkinsons, which is not surprising, especially as Dr. John Wilkinson, 
the Visitor, and President of Magdalen, who also had been Principal of Magdalen 
Hall, adds to the chances of confusion. There was a fourth Wilkinson (John) a 
layman " of Bucks, gent." (Annals), who was a Visitor as well as Dr. John, and 
Henry Wilkinson, senior. He was brother to this Henry Wilkinson, junior; and 
they were nephews of Dr. John Wilkinson a family party. See note to p. 3. 



112 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 26, 1648. and expelled by an expresse Order of the Committee of Lords and 
Commons for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon, bearinge 
date May 22, 1648. 

Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Jo. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Cheynell. 

Dr. Rogers. 

May 26, 1648. An Order for amovinge Mr. Wallwyn, of St. John's Colledge. 

Whereas Mr. Wallwyn, of St. John's Colledge, hath beene con- 
victed of an high contempt of the authority of Parliament; and is 
by a spetiall Order of the right honorable Committee of Lords 
and Commons for the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxford, 
adjudged, and amoved from the said Colledge and Universitie: 
Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxford, beinge required 
to put the Order abovesaid in execution, doe hereby desire the 
soldiery in Oxon to assist us therein if the said Mr. Wallwyn shall 
upon sight hereof refuse to remove from the Colledge and Univer- 
sitie aforesaid, from both of which hee is expelled. 

May 26, 1648. Ordered, that noe Scholar, Officer, or Member of this Universitie, 
of what ranke, degree, or quality soever, shall goe forth of this 
Universitie into any part of the countrie without leave from Dr. 
Wilkinson, now Pro vice- Chancellor of this Universitie, upon payne 
of expulsion untill further Order. 

Ordered, that all Scholars, Officers, or Members of this Univer- 
sitie, and everie of them of what ranke, degree, or qualitie soever 
now in Oxon, doe within 7 daies, upon payne of expulsion, bringe 
in a directe Answere unto this Question followinge: Doe you sub- 
mitt to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation? and deliver 
their Answere in wrytinge unto Doctor Wilkinson, the present 
Provice-Chancellor of this Universitie, and subscribe it in his 
presence with their owne hands ; exceptinge such only as have 
already given in their Answeres to the Question aforesaid. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 113 

An Order to the Professors and Lecturers. May 26, 1648. 

(P. no.) 

Whereas the Professors and Lecturers of this University have 
beene very carelesse and necgligent for these three termes last past: 
These are to will and require all such as clayme any right to the 
place or office of a Professor or Lecturer in this Universitie, to 
repairc hither within eight daies, to performe that duty and service 
unto which they are obliged by their severall oathes and all reason- 
able statutes respectively, under payne of beinge censured accordinge 
to their demerits. a 

Present of the Visitors : 

x Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Jo. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Cheynell. 

Dr. Rogers 

Ordered : That accordinge to the Orders wee have receaved from May 26, 1648. 
the right honorable the Committee of Lords and Commons for the 
Reformation of the Universitie of Oxford, Mr. Henry Tozer, of 
Exeter Colledge, Mr. Lee, of Mert.on Colledge, and Mr. Walwyn, 
of St. John's Colledge in Oxford aforesaid, be deprived of all power, 
priviledges, and profitts of their places and offices in those severall 
Colledges aforesaid respectively, and expelled the Universitie afore- 
said for their high contempt of the authority of Parliament. And 
the Souldiery of the Garison are hereby desired to see this Order 
put in execution in case that all or any one of the persons aforesaid 
shall refuse to yeild obedience hereunto. 

May 26 th , 1648. (P. us., 

Ordered that Mr. John Bowles [Boulds or Bolds], Fellow of Pem- 
brooke Colledge, be hereby suspended from all power and priviledge 
of a Fellow or Member of Pembrooke Colledge. And from all and 
singuler the proffits and emoluments of his Fellowshipp. 

a This and the two immediately preceding Orders of May 26 were " posted up 27th 
of the said month." (Annals.) It must be admitted that they were necessary under 
the circumstances. 

CAMD. SOC. Q 



114 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 26, 1648. May 26, 1648. 

Ordered : That accordinge to the Orders which wee have receaved 
from the Committee of the Lords and Commons for the Keformation 
of the Universitie of Oxford 

Mr. Croucher, Mr. Creede, 

1. Dr. Edwards, Mr. Osbaston, 

2. Mr. Gisby, Mr. Walwyn, 
Mr. Goad, 

Fellowes of St. John's Colledge, be deprived of all power, priviledge, 
and protitts of their respective places and offices in the Colledge 
aforesaid, and expelled the Universitie. 

May 26, 1648. 

Ordered : That accordinge to the Orders which wee have receaved 
from the right honorable Committee of the Lords and Commons 
for the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxford : These persons 
whose names are underwritten be deprived of all power, priviledge, 
and profitts of their respective places in Magdalen Colledge, and 
expelled the Universitie : 

Mr. Forman. Mr. Duncombe: Steward. 

Mr. Law. Mr. Yerbury. 

Mr. Chyles. Mr. Holden. 

Mr. Ed. Drope. Mr. Clutterbooke. 

Mr. Home: Clerke. Mr. Browne: demy. 

Mr. Taylor. Mr. Exton. 

Mr. Piers. 
And that the Soldiery be hereby desired to remove them. a 

a The Visitors had no resource but force, as will be seen by the following notes 
from Wood's Annals : On May 27 th the Order placed by the Visitors on the gate 
of Corpus Christi College to depose Dr. Newlin, the President, was torn down by 
some members of the College. On May 29 th , the birthday of Prince Charles, bonfires 
were lit in defiance of Parliament, at New College and Trinity, for which the offenders 
at the former were imprisoned. On May 30 th , " on account of the great resort of 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 115 



The Answeres of some of the Members of Exeter Coll. not May 28, 164S. 

f , (P. 112.) 

formerly given in. 

F: Munday : I cannot submitt to this Visitation. As for theBal': 
second question : I cannot conceive my selfe soe much concerned 
in it as Convocation men, and therefore shall desire tyme till some 
Convocation men shall Answere first. 

Tho: Finch : I cannot submitt to this Visitation. To the 2 d Servif. 
question, concerninge my submission to $he present Government, 
it is too difficult for me to determyne of. 

Daniell Cudmore, Serviter: I cannot submitt to this Visitation, 
for my conscience tells me 'tis unlawfull and usurped; neither dare 
I submitt to this present Government for the former reason. 

Hen: Bull, Serviter : I cannot acknowledge the power of 
Parliament in this Visitation: neither doe I submitt to this present 
Government. 

"William Manninge : I cannot acknowledge the power of Parlia- 
ment derived to the Visitors to be Legall. 

Neither can I submitt to those that are ordayned Vice-Chancellor 
and Proctors by the same authority. 

persons to Dr. Sheldon in prison, and to Dr. Hammond," these eminent men, whom 
the harassed University was now constantly consulting, were ordered by the London 
Committee to be removed to Wallingford Castle; the governor of which Castle, how- 
ever, refused to receive them. On June 4, Mr. Henry Tozer, the expelled sub-rector 
of Exeter, was fetched out of Carfax Church by a guard of soldiers, and his ministry 
there inhibited " because he seduced the people." It may here be noticed that on 
May 27 th the Houses of Lords and Commons issued two important Orders con- 
cerning the University: (1) " That the Committee shall have power to send for in 
custody, and to imprison, any such persons as shall be found under contempt of the 
authority of Parliament ; and (2) That the Visitors shall have power to take away 
and destroy all such pictures, images, crucifixes, or reliques, which should be ad- 
judged by them to be superstitious or idolatrous." 



116 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



28 1648. Christ-Church . 

ExEde: Xti: 

James Coowes: I James Coowes doe submitt to this Visitation, 
and will to all such Governors as shall be appoynted by the Parlia- 
ment in the Universitie. 

Robert Yonge: I doe with heart and hand submitt to all 
Ordinances of Parliament, espetially to this Visitation : in wittnesse 
of my fidelitie herein I subscribe my name also to the present 
Government of the Universitie. 

May 29, 1648. Lincoln Colledge. 

Josua Crosse, Fellow of Lincolne Coll : 

I doe with all willingenesse submitt to the authority of Parlia- 
ment in this Visitation. I doe likewise willingely submitt to the 
present Government of this Universitie by the Chancellor, Vice- 
Chancellour, &c. established by the imediate authoritie of both 
Houses of Parliament. 

John Parks, of Lincolne Coll: Socius: 

The power of Parliament concerninge the Visitinge of this 
Universitie I acknowledge, and to that Government which is 
established by the imediate power of Parliament I submitt unto. 



(P. 1H.) Mag: Hall: 

Hen: Wood : ex Aula Magdalen : 

I doe acknowledge the lawfulnesse of the authoritie of this present 
Visitation, and therefore doe submitt unto the Chancellor, Vice- 
Chancelour, &c. established by Order of Parliament. 

New College. 

I, Edward Farmer, Fellow of New Colledge, doe humbly acknow- 
ledge myselfe convicted in conscience to submitt unto the power of 
Parliament in this present Visitation. ED: FARMER. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 117 

All-Soules. May 29, 1648. 

Hen: Birkhead a of Allsoules : 

Whereas I was formerly permitted to submitt to the authoritie of 
Parliament in the Visitation in my owne sence : At this second 
Summons I doe the same, vizt. as farre as lawfully I may, for I 
desire neither to meddle nor to be meddled with. 

I doe also submitt to the present Government of this Universitie 
by the Chancellor, Vice Chancellor, and Proctors, established by the 
i mediate authority of both Houses of Parliament, as farre as law- 
fully I may. 

Aula Cervina. b 

Robert Johnson: I doe submitt to the authority of Parliament in (P- H5.) 
this Visitation, and to the present Government of this Universitie. 

Robert Atkins: I doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in 
this Visitation, and to the present Government of this Universitie. 

Robert Bragge: I doe willingely submitt to the authoritie of 
Parliament in this Visitation, and to the present Government of this 
Universitie. 

4 

& Birkhead was the founder of the Oxford Chair of Poetry. As a Scholar of 
Trinity he had been induced by the Jesuits to join the Church of Rome; had been 
reclaimed by Laud's personal influence, and through him had obtained his All Souls 
Fellowship. These fluctuations indicate the tone of mind and character which caused 
him first to submit; then to retract, as here, for which he is set down for expulsion; 
yet finally to remain in his place, as appears later on. Warton, the best of judges, 
speaks of him as " an elegant scholar and ingenious Latin poet." (Life of Bathurst, 
p. 160.) After the Restoration he became Registrar of the diocese of Norwich. 

b The only institution in Oxford known under four organic changes. Founded as 
Anla Cervina, or Hart Hall, in 1282, it was chartered as Hertford College in 1740; 
dissolved from insufficiency of endowments in 1805; its site and part of its endow- 
ments transferred, in 1816, to Magdalen Hall, when that institution (founded as a 
dependency of Magdalen College 1480, and becoming an independent Hall in 1602) 
broke up from its old quarters ; and finally, by the exertions of the Principal, Dr. 
Michell, and the munificence of Mr. Thomas Baring, M.P. it was again chartered as 



118 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 29, 1648. John Clark, Art: Bac: Collegio Corporis Christ! : 

I am not as yet satisfied in conscience that I may lawfully sub- 
mitt to the present Visitation, or to any other authority -which is not 
derived as well from the Kinge as from both Houses of Parliament. 

Geor: Wake: Soe farre as Oxon Articles (whereof I have the 
benefitt, and upon which I have compounded) doe oblige mee, and 
soe farre as my former oathes and my conscience will allow me, I 
submitt to the authoritie of the Parliament, and noe further. 

John Sanders, Provost of Oriell Coll: 

I for the present referre my selfe to the Answere presented by 
me (October last) in the name of the Colledge, the grounds thereof 
beinge the stronge obligation of severall oathes by me in publique 
and solemne manner taken, which I have not since that tyme beene, 
nor doe yet understand how I cann be released. The same grounds 
therefore still remayninge, I doe not well see how I can recede from 
or alter my former resolution without violence to my conscience, 
the preservation whereof hath hitherto beene, and still is, the 
unfained and sole end of that and this my Answere, which I desire 
may be as charitably interpreted as it is humbly and sincerely pre- 
sented by 

Jo: SANDERS, Provost of Oriell Colledge. a 

" Hertford College " in 1874, with a splendid foundation for 14 fellows and 29 scholars. 
It now awaits the creation of suitable buildings, which must as a matter of course 
follow. 

All the Halls alike are wholly in favour of the Parliament, but Magdalen and New 
Inn Halls are the only ones which contained any number of members at this period, 
the war having been ruinous to these poor foundations. Why was this distinction 
from the Colleges so strongly marked ? Did it represent a spirit of opposition to the 
great Foundations which overshadowed them, or was it the effect of personal in- 
fluences? It could not be accidental. 

a This is the strongest case we have of a place being retained in spite of non- 
submission. Wood tells us, " Dr. Saunders kept his place till the time of his death 
(165|) by friends in the Committee." (Annals.) It is however easy to observe at 
this time grounds for the suspicion which was once expressed in the line 

" Methinks the lady doth protest too much." 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 119 



Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the May 30, 1648. 
Universitie of Oxon : 

Whereas this Committee is informed, That Mr. John Eeyland 
and Mr. William Cox, Fellowes of Magdalen Colledge, and Peter 
Draper, a servant, have gathered certaine Rents belonginge to 
Magdalen Colledge aforesaid, and not paid them to the President 
of that house appoynted by authority of Parliament: It is Ordered, 
that the said persons be required fortwith to appeare before this 
Committee to Answere the same. FRANCIS Rous. 

Concordat cum Originali: RA: AUSTEN. 

[By the Visitors.] 

June 1, 1648. June 1, 1648. 

(P. 117.) 
This day Mr. Samuell Bedford appeared before us, the Visitors 

of the Universitie of Oxford, to make his adresse to us concerninge 
the Auditorshipp of Christ Church. 

By Letter from the Earle of Manchester it was certified that the 
Lords' House, upon the desire of the Committee of both Kinge- 
domes, July 2, 1646, did vote Mr. Bedford, their Scout-Master 
Generall, Auditor of Christ Church, and to that end did recom- 
mend him to the Visitors. 

The same day, as appeares by Mr. Rous his certificate, the House 
of Commons referred the businesse of the Auditorshipp of Christ- 
church to the Committee for the Reformation of the Universitie of 
Oxford for examination thereof. In pursuance of which Order 
Articles were exhibited by Mr. Samuell Bedford against Mr. Jo: 
Kinge, Auditor of Christ Church, for beinge in armes against the 
Parliament. And divers wittnesses produced by Plaintiffe and 
Defendant, upon hearinge of both, the Committee voted Mr. Kinge 
a delinquent. 



120 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June l, 1648. Also this day a Letter to the Visitors concerninge Mr. King's 
delinquency was brought from the Committee of Chychester. 

Upon consideration whereof Mr. Bedford desires to be admitted 
by the Visitors and the Deane and Prebendaries of Christ Church, 
to the place and office of Auditor of Christ Church aforesaid, hee 
havinge proved Mr. Kinge a delinquent. 

(P. 128.) June 1, 1648. An Order to Dr. Radcliffe to deliver the Keyes, 

Bookes, ,&c. 

Ordered that Dr. Radcleiffe, now lodginge in Brasen Nose Col- 
ledge, doe forthwith, upon sight hereof, deliver up to Mr. Daniell 
Greenewood, or his Assigne, all his keyes of the Treasury, the 
Corne Booke, Lease Booke, Rentalls, and what other Bookes or 
Keyes hee hath in his custody belonginge to the Colledge aforesaid. 
And, in case the said Dr. Radcliffe shall refuse to obey this present 
Order, the souldiary are hereby desired to sett a Guard upon the 
said Dr. Ratcliffe, which Guard is to be mayntayned at the proper 
cost and charges of Dr. Ratcliffe aforesaid. 



June 1 : 1648. 

(P. 129.) Answers of some of Trinity Colledge Members not formally 

given in. 

Walter Ettricke: I desire liberty of conscience, by vertue whereof 
I cannot satisfie you how farre I may submitt. 

Matthew Skinner: As concerninge the power of Parliament in 
this Visitation I referre my selfe to the Answere of the Delegates 
for the Universitie- 

William Radford: To this question proposed, whether I submitt 
to the power of Parliament in this Visitation, my Answere is, that 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 121 

I referre my selfe to the Answere given in formerly by the Dele- J nn e 1, 1648. 
gates of the Universitie. 

To this Question, whether I submitt to this present government 
of this Universitie established by imediate authoritie of Parlia- 
ment : 

My Answere is, that I conceive this Question to be included in 
the precedinge Question. 

Tho: Maryott: I doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament, and 
this Visitation. 

Raphe Batters [Ralph Bathurst] : a I submitt to the authoritie of 
Parliament in this Visitation. 

Ezekiell Tonge, b of Universitie Colledge, A: Bacc: I submitt to (P. 130.) 
the authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation. 

a This is the celebrated Dr. Bathurst, President of Trinity from 1664 to 1704, 
Chaplain to Charles II. and Dean of Wells. He was one of the founders of the Royal 
Society. Long subsequent to his submission, he thus accounted for it : "I was con- 
stantly in Oxford, amongst other the King's loyal subjects, from the beginning of 
the wars in 1642 until the town was surrendered in 1646. The articles of that 
surrender, as they left other persons to their respective compositions, sb they subjected 

the University to a Visitation When the Visitation passed upon us I 

thought I had no more to do but to sit still and rest content with whatever befel 
under a prevailing party ; yet neither owning their authority, nor concurring in my 
principles with them; but rather acting separately from them. ... It was my 
fortune to escape, as many others, persons of unquestionable loyalty, did Dr. Barlow, 
Dr. Lang'oaine, Dr. Zouch, Dr. Say, &c. with whom and such like I had my con- 
stant converse, and scarce knew or was known to any of the whole party. (Life, 
&c., by Thomas Warton, p. 205.) It should also be said that Bathurst, though 
ordained priest during the Commonwealth, did signal service to the State as physician 
to the sick and wounded of the Navy (see below), yet remained in close connection 
with the leading Royalists and exiled clergy. When his services were required to 
assist Skinner, Bishop of Oxford, in those secret Ordinations which he courageously 
performed, regardless of the danger he incurred, Bathurst found his professional 
visits as a physician a useful pretext. 

b See below. 
CAMD. SOC. B 



122 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June l, 1648 John Barnard, of Lincolne Colledge, A: Bac: I doe willingely 
submitt to the ordinance of Parliament for this present Visitation 
of the Universitie of Oxford. 

Jo: Worthingeton, of Mag: Coll: Demy : I doe with all willinge- 
nesse submitt to any thinge in your Visitation that is not against 
my conscience. 

Francis Gallimore : I have submitted unto the ordinance of Par- 
liament in the Visitation before the Visitors. 

Geo: Alexander, of Magdalene Colledge: I cannot submitt to 
this Visitation by reason of those oathes which I have formerly 
taken, without perjury. 

Josias Banger, of Magdalene Colledge: I will submitt to this 
Visitation soe farre as I may with a saffe conscience : concerning 
which, post revolutionem animi hoc tantum scio, me nihil scire. 

Tho: Smith, Medic: D r : Coll : JEneanas : I doe and shall submitt 
to the Parliament in this Visitation, soe farre as they shall endeavor 
a reformation, accordinge to the purity and integritie of the best 
tymes. 

(P. 131.) Lodo: Mason, of Magdalen Colledge : I cannot submitt to this 
Visitation with a saffe conscience by reason of former oathes which 
I have taken. 

Charles Edwards, of Allsoules Coll : 

I humbly submitt to this Visitation, as farre as its proceedinge 
be accordinge to the Lawes of the Land, and the Statutes of this 
Universitie. 

Samuell Fisher, Allsouls Colledge. 

I submitt to this Visitation as farre as lawfully I may, and the 
Statutes of the Universitie may not oblige mee to the contrary. 



THE VISITORS 5 REGISTER. 123 

Tho: Readings, of Brasen Nose Coll : June 1, 1648. 

I submitt to this Visitation, soe farre as the Statutes of the 
Universitie and my owne particuler Oathes can permitt mee. 

John Wynne, of Allsoules: I humbly submitt to this Visitation 
as farre as it may lawfully concerne mee. 

Joseph Grigge : I cannot for the present feel satisfied how I can 
without violence to my conscience submitt to this Visitation. 

I cannot till I am further informed submitt to the Chancellor, 
Vice -Chancellor, and Proctors established by the authoritie of both 
Houses of Parliament. 

Randall Sanderson, of Queene's Colledge: 

As reformation of abuses is the endeavor, and viz, soe that bonds 
of particuler oathes should any whitt forestall soe needefull a worke, 
is the greiffe of RANDALL SANDERSON. 

The present Government of the Universitie I submitt to, soe farre 
as I shall hereafter understand the same, not thaurtinge any former 
tye already upon mee. 

Edward Wilkinson, of Queene's Colledge, Master of Arts : (P. 132.) 

1. How farre the power of the 2 honorable Houses extends I 
know not: I hope my Ignorance in a poynt of soe high a Nature 
may excuse mee. But with all humility I willingely submitt as 
farre as lawfully I may without any prejudice to my conscience. 

2 1 ?. I am not obstinate, but shall submitt soe farre as may not be 
prejuditiall to former Oathes. 

Rowlan Arris, of Magdalen Colledge: 

I doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation. 

James Farren, Oriell Colledge : 

I doe submitt myselfe to the authoritie of the Parliament and 
their substitutes in this Visitation, with the present Government of 
this Universitie. 



124 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jnne i, 1648. Edm: Tillesley, S: Job: Bapt: Socius : 

Beinge absolutely of beleiffe that the power of Visitation of this 
Universitie is solely fixt in the Kinge, beinge one of the cbeife 
preheminences of his Crowne, which by oath of allegeance I am 
bound as a subject to observe : As likewise beinge assured by the 
private statutes of my Colledge, that, by dispensation from him, 
this power is deputed only to the Bishop of Winchester : And for 
the Government of this Universitie otherwise then formerly, it has 
beene establisht and grounded on the Statutes thereof : To any or 
either of these Orders I neither dare nor can submitt without 
deliberate and complicated perjury: qu<v in cetemum absit a mente 
Christiana. 

St: Jo: Coll: Stephan Boughton : I cannot submitt either to this Visitation, 
or Government of the Universitie as now it is, with a saffe 
Conscience. 

(P. 133.) Jo: Kobinson, of Queene's Coll: 

Accordinge to that knowledge which God hath bestowed on 
mee, soe farre as I understand, in the authoritie of a Parliament, 
I adheare, and submitt to this Visitation, which I ever desire as 
for a Reformation in many things, soe espetially in poynt of Church 
Government and Doctrine : And doe submit to the Government of 
the Universitie. 

Thomas Hancock, of Christ Church : 

I submit to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation and 
to the government setled in this University by vertue of the same 
authority. 

June 2, 1648. Mr. Tilsley, of St: Jo: Coll: a 

Hee saith two Estates without the Third is nothinge. 
And hee is also this day suspended from exercising any eccle- 
siasticall function at North-More. 

a He is now recalled, though explicit enough on the previous day. He was voted 
dangerous. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 125 

Godwyn Swift : In respect of oathes that I have formerly taken St. John's Coll: 
I can subscribe to noe Visitors but which come from the Bishop of 
Winchester. GODWYN SWIFT. 

The said Godwin Swift saith that hee was put in Sexton upon 
the first of March last past by Dr. Bayly the President. 
But Dr. Bayley was evicted Jan. 20 th , 1647. 

William Roy, Under Butler: I understand not this Question, St: Jo: Coll: 
and therefore can give noe Answere. 

Sam: Smith, of St: Jo: Coll: I submitt to the authoritie of Sep: 29 th , 1648: 
Parliament in this present Visitation. 

June 2, 1648. 

This day there mett in St: John's Hall Dr. Wilkinson, Provice (p 134 ) 
Chancellor, Dr. Rogers, Dr. Harris, Mr. Jo: Wilkinson, and Mr. 
Cheynell, Visitors of this Universitie, to enquire into the state of 
St: Jo: Baptist Coll. 

The same day possession was delivered of the President's Lodg- 
ings of St: Jo: Bapt: Colledge to Mr. Cheynell by us whose names 
are underwritten. a 

Jo: Wilkinson, Provicecan. 

Robert Harris. 

Christopher Rogers. 

Jo: Wilkinson. 

Joshua Crosse, Proctor. Senior. 

Also this day Mr. Crowcher delivered two keys, the one the key 
of the till box in the great iron chest in the Bursary, the other 
the key of the middle locke to the great chest in the Tower." 

a The President's lodgings had to be broken open on this occasion. (Annals.) 
b The Tower was also the Treasury of All Souls, and probably of other Colleges, 
as their most defensible part. 



126 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



June 3, 1648. 
(P. 135.) 

Mr. Taylour, 
Butler, of 
John Baptist 
Colledge. 



Dr. Stringer. 
June 5, 1648. 



The Answere of Mr. -Taylor, Butler of St: Jo: Coll: 
June 3, 1648. 

As yet I am not satisfied in conscience (in relation to oathes 
which I have formerly taken) how I may submitt, otherwise then 
passively, and soe farre as concernes the regulatinge of my actions 
and manners. WM: TAYLOR. 

Wm: Taylor: As I am a servant to the Colledge, so I shall 
conforme my selfe as I shalbe directed by them accordinge to my 
oath given mee by the Colledge. WM: TAYLOR. 

I desire tyme to consider for an Answere to the last Question, 
which was, whether I would submitt to Mr. Cheynell as President 
of St: John's Coll: WM: TAYLOR. 

Whereas you have beene cited by a generall summons heretofore, 
and since by a more spetiall summons as a Lecturer in the Universitie, 
and noe satisfactory retourne hath beene as yet made unto us : 
Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, doe now againe hereby cite 
you to make your personall appearance before us sittinge at the 
President's Lodgings in Magdalen Colledge this 6 of June, at two 
of the clocke in the afternoone. 8 

To Dr. Stringer at New Colledge. 



a Dr. Stringer, Greek Lecturer to the University, had been elected Warden by the 
Fellows of New College, 1647, in defiance of the Visitors, on the demise of Dr. Pink, 
and, though refusing submission, he contrived to hold his place till Jan. 25. 164&, 
when he was at last superseded by Dr. Marshall. The Visitors found it very difficult 
to deal with New College. They ejected Stringer from his Lectureship on Sept. 14, 
1648 ; this was an easier matter. Marshall was Parliamentary Chaplain to the 
garrison of Oxford. He had been " a Cambridge Student of Divinity for twenty 
years at least." (Fasti, ii. 114.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 127 

June 5, 1648. Jnne 5, 1648. 

(P 137 ^ 
Mr. Gisby: These are to authorise you to apprehend the body of 

Mr. Gisby, who lodges in St. John Baptist Colledge, and to keepe 
him in safe custody untill hee shall give full satisfaction to the 
Visitors for his high contempt of the authority of Parliament, and 
to the Colledge for what ever hee shalbe found to be indebted to it 
upon a true Accompt. 

To the Provost Marshall of the 
Garrison of Oxon. 

June 5, 1648. 

Dr. Edwards : These are to authorise you to apprehend the body 
of Dr. Edwards, who lodges in St. John Baptist Colledge, and to 
keepe him in safe custody untill hee give satisfaction to the Visitors 
for his manifold misdemeanors, and to the Colledge aforesaid for 
what ever hee shalbe found to bee indebted to it upon a true 
Accompt. 

To the Provost Marshall of the 
Garrison of Oxon. 

A viis et modis to Dr. Stringer of New Colledge. June 6, 1648. 

Dr. Stringer : Whereas you have beene cited by severall Sum- 
mons and personally sought by our Officer, who cold not finde you : 
Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, doe now cite you Omnibus 
viis et modis to make your personall appearance before the Vice- 
Chancellor or his Deputy upon the eight day of this instant June, 
and give in a plaine and direct Answere to this Question : Doe you 
submitt to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation ? 

And hereof you are not to faile as you will Answere the con- 
trary. 



128 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



June 6, 1648. 

(P. 138.) 
Seepag:262. 
The names of 
the witnesses 
that were 
examined con- 
cerning Mr. 
Greaves. 8 



June 6, 1648. 

These are to require you, and everie of you whose names are 
underwritten, to make your personall appearance before us, sittinge 
at the President's Lodgings in Magdalen Colledge, betweene the 
howers of 2 and 3 this afternoone, to testifie the truth in a particuler 
case to be examined by us. And hereof you are not to faile as you 
will Answere the contrary. 

Mr. French, 

Mr. Copley, 

Mr. Sayre, 

Mr. Lee, 



Mr. Brent, 

Nathaniell James. 
Jo: Blackham. 
Tho: Hawkines. 
Avis Smith. 



Fellowes of 
Merton Coll: 



Phillipp Alport and his wife. 
Annie Shan. 
William Noble. 



June 6, 1648. 

These are to authorise you to seize a large Truncke which was 
this morninge brought into a Barber's house over against Universitie 
Colledge, and for so doinge this shalbe your sufficient warrant. 

To the Provost Marshall of the 
Garrison of Oxofi. 

a Graves, or Greaves, was Fellow of Merton and Professor of Astronomy. His 
case occupies many pages of the Register, French and he having mutually accused 
each other of helping the King to obtain the Merton treasure. Various other pec- 
cadilloes with the courtiers and Queen's confessor are laid to Graves's charge (see 
below), and he seems to have been instrumental in the ejection of Sir Nathaniel 
Brent by the King. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 129 



June 6. 1648. A Summons to Dr. Langbane, Provost of Queenes Jane 6, 1648. 

n n A (P. 139.) 

Colleage. a 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, hereby require you to make 
your personall appearance before us at the President's Lodgings in 
Magdalen College, betweene 4 and 5 of the clocke in the after- 
noone of this present 6 of June, to answere such Questions as shall 
be demaunded of you. 

Answers of some Members of severall Colledges not formerly (P. 140.) 

June 6, 1648. 
given. 

John Good, of Bal: Coll: (P. 140.; 

My humble reply to the Question proposed by the Visitors is that 
I am not fully satisfied in some perticulers concerninge this Visita- 
tion. 

Sebastian Nash, of Bal: Coll: To this present Visitation and 
Government I shall soe farre submitt as herein I shall not be guilty 
of perjury. 

James Lidford, of Magdallen Coll: 

I acknowledge the power of Parliament in this way of Visitinge. 

Henry Willis, Butler of Universitie Coll: 

I doe fully and wholy submitt to all lawfull authority, and this is 
the Answere of Henry Willis. 

Jo: Bryce, Coll: Mag: Mag r : Art: 

As farre as the oathes which I have taken at my matriculation 
and degrees in the Universitie, and my oathes at my admission and 
preferments in my Colledge will permitt me, I doe submitt to this 
Visitation and noe further. 

a Dr. Langbaine's answer is not given, but he submitted. His case was referred 
to in the note on Dr. Bathurst as that of a decided Royalist and Churchman, who 
yet thought it right to give way to the power of Parliament. See Introduction. 
CAMD. SOC. S 



130 



THE VISITORS 7 REGISTER. 



June 6, 1648. 



Merton Coll: 



(P. 141.) 



Marke Kinge, A:E: of Edmund Hall: 

I, Marke Kinge, doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in 
this Visitation, and to the Government of this Universitie. 

W m Huntley, of Queenes Coll: 

As for this present Visitation I shall willingly suffer all my 
Actions to be tryed by them, and to their censure I shall submitt. 

Roger Brent, of Merton Colledge : 

I, Roger Brent, doe submitt to the authority of Parliament and 
this Visitation. 

Nath: James, Butler of Merton Colledge: 

I beleeve a Parliament hath power to visit this Universitie, and I 
doe submitt. 

Jo: Blackman, Porter of Merton Colledge : 
I doe submitt. 

Austen Boxley, of Merton Colledge : 

I, not yet understandinge the Question, desire to be guided by 
the Warden and Masters of that Colledge in which I am a servant. 

William Noble, Cooke of Merton Colledge : 

I submitt to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Tho: Tyas, Master of Arts, Christ Church : 

I know not how I should submitt to this Visitation, and not 
oppresse my conscience with that sin of perjury. 

Baldwyn Acland, of Exeter Colledge : 

I will in all humility submitt to this Visitation when I shalbe 
satisfied that I may.* 

a In spite of this negative answer Acland remained in his place till 1651, when 
he declined the Engagement, and retired with his pupils among whom was young 
George Bull to Somersetshire. Nelson attributes much of Bull's subsequent 
eminence to the teaching of Acland, a man " very considerable for his learning 
and piety, zealous for his sovereign when so many of his subjects and friends for- 
sook him, and true to the interest of the Church in her most afflicted circumstances " 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 131 

Josiah Lane, Corp: Christ: Coll: June 6, 1648. 

I humbly conceive the authority wherby this present Visitation is 
carried on to be lawful^ and therefore submitt to it. 

Geo: Clarke, Fellow of Merton Colledge : 

I submitt to the power and authoritie of Parliament in this Visita- 
tion: given under ray hand. 

These answeares have been returned, the last return was made 
June 14th : vide pag: 148. 

The answeares which are not yet returned begin at pag: 155. 

I, William Borlace, doe submitt unto the authority of the Parlia- Sept. 20, 1648. 
ment in this Visitation. [Interpolated.] 

Ordered: (P. 142.) 

. , . . ... June 6, 1648. 

I hat all who doe not clearely, and without any condition or 

reservation, submitt, shalbe retourned to the Committee of Lords 
and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie as guilty of not 
submittinge to the authority of Parliament. 

Ordered : 

That Mr. Wilkinson be hereby desired to make retourne of all 
those Answeres which have beene presented to the Visitors since his 
last retourne. 

> 

(Life of Bull, Works, vii. 9). He had been senior Proctor in the eventful year 1641. 
It is remarkable that a man of such principles should have found so much favour 
with the Visitors as to call forth the Order which appears below, a week after 
permission had been given to Exeter to elect its own Rector. That Order certainly 
suggests Acland to the Fellows as an acceptable candidate, and appears to be 
another instance of a nearer approximation between the learned and religious men 
of both parties than is generally supposed to have existed. Perhaps Acland did 
not desire the office. We do not hear of hiifteceiving any votes. The election fell 
upon John Conant, the uncle of the John Conant who has been already noticed ; 
but he, not wishing to reside, declined in favour of his nephew, the candidate of the 
minority, who was soon afterwards elected. (See Conant's Life and Boase's Reg. 
Exon.) 



132 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 6, 1648. Ordered: 

That all who lay clayme to any Fellowshipp, Scholarshipp, place 
of power, trust, or advantage in the Universitie of Oxford, or any 
Colledge or Hall therein respectively, doe within 15 daics repaire 
hither to this Universitie to performe their duty and undergoe this 
present Visitation, as they and everie of them will Answere the 
contrary. 

June 6, 1648. Ordered: 

That the Keyes of John Baptists Colledge be kept in the hand of 
Mr. Webb, a Fellow of the said Colledge. And that Mr. Webb take 
care, in the absence of Mr. Cheynell, for the preservation of the 
peace, securinge the evidences, bookes, and goods, orderinge the 
affaires, and receavinge the dues of the said Colledge, and in case 
hee finde any opposition or receave any affront, upon complaint to 
the Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, the souldiery of this garrison 
are desired to send Mr. Webb sufficient ayde to secure the goods, 
evidences, and books, and to remove all such persons as doe disturb 
the peace of the Colledge, or hinder this Order from takinge its due 
effect. 

(P. 143.) June 6, 1648. 

Ordered : That, accordinge to the Orders which wee have 
receaved from the Right Honorable the Committee of Lords and 
Commons for the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxford, Mr. 
Croucher, Mr. Goade, Mr. Creede, and Mr. Walwyn, be deprived of 
all power, priviledge, and profitts of their respective places and 
offices in John Baptist's Colledge, and expelled the Universitie for 
their high contempt of the authority of Parliament. And the 
souldiery of this garrison are Jiereby desired to see this Order put 
in execution, in case they, or any one of them, refuse to yeild 

a " A person very scandalous, as by the generality accounted." (Annals.) This 
may or may not be true. 



THE VISITOKS' REGISTER. 133 

obedience to it within the tyme which is commonly allowed men in June 6, 1648. 
the like case to remove from hence. 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, takinge into seriouse con- 
sideration the great paynes of our officers, and their small or noe 
benifitt receaved in and by their respective places : It is this day 
Ordered, That upon the yssuinge out of everie Order for the 
admission of any Fellow or Schollar into any Colledge or Hall in 
this Universitie of Oxofi, elected by us, the Visitors of the said 
Universitie, that everie Fellow shall pay Five Shillings, and everie 
Schollar 3 s 4 d for their respective Orders: which somes we hereby 
admitt our said ^officers to demaund and take accordinge to the said 
proportions. 

Dr. Sanderson removed, 1. Non- Submission. Dr. Sanderson. 

June 14, 1648. 2. Expulsion. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Eeformation of 
the Universitie of Oxon. 

Whereas the Answeres of Dr. Fell, Dean of Christ Church, and 
others, the Prebendaries of Christ Church in Oxford, refusinge to 
submitt to the authoritie of Parliament for Visitinge the said Uni- 
versitie, were referred to this Committee by Spetiall Order of both 
Houses of Parliament to heare and determyne, and to apply effectuall 
remeadies as the cases should require : Upon full hearinge and 
debate of the said Answeres it was resolved that the matter thereof 
was an high contempt and denyall of authoritie of Parliament; and 
farther resolved, that Dr. Sanderson was guilty hereof. And that, 
for an effectuall remeady, the said Dr. Sanderson be removed from 
his place of Prebendary of Christ Church and Eegius Professor of 
the Universitie of Oxford. And whereas, upon further considera- 
tion, this Committee thought fitt and ordered that their former 
Vote should be suspended in hope of his submission to the autho- 



134 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 14, 1648. ritie and conformitie to the Orders and Ordinances, of Parliament 
for the Reformation of the Universitie: Now upon hearinge the 
Report of the Visitors (which is), That the said Dr. Sanderson hath 
not all this while given any satisfactorie testimony of his Sub- 
mission : It is therefore ordered that the last Vote of this Committee 
concerninge the suspension of the said Dr. Sanderson be taken off 
and revoked, and the former Vote concerninge his removall doe 
stand and be confirmed. 8 FRAN: Rons. 

(P. 147.) Junii 14, 1648. 

Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon. 

Whereas this Committee have thought fitt and ordered that D r 
Sanderson for his high contempt, and denyall of authoritie of Par- 
liament be removed from his place of Prebendarie of Christ-Church, 
and Regius Professor of the Universitie of Oxford : It is ordered, 
that it be recommended to the Visitors at Oxford to put M r Robert 
Crosse, of Lincolne Colledge, into the said places of Collegiate 
Prebend: of Christ Church and Regius Professor of Divinitie in 
the Universitie of Oxford. FRAN: Rons. 

(P. 148.) Expulsion. 11 

June id, 1648 Magdalen Coll: 

Lodowicke Mason. Jo: Worthingeton, 

Josias Banger. demy: Master of Arts. 

* Geo: Alexander. Stephen Boughton. 

Jo: Brice. Geo: Wake, Fellow. 

Slade, Cooke. 

a Dr. Robert Sanderson. The life of this great man by Isaak Walton has made 
his history too familiar to require further notice. Perhaps he may share with 
Hammond the highest place amongst the learned Royalists of this period. With 
Sheldon, Hammond, and Morley he attended Charles I. to the last; at the Restora- 
tion he became Bishop of Lincoln. 

b This is the list referred to at p. 131. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 135 



St: Johns Coll: Je 6, 1648. 

Edm: Tillesley. William Taylor, Butler. 

Queenes Coll: 
Randall Sanderson. Edward Wilkinson. 

Corpus Christi Coll: 
Jo: Clerke, Bacc: Art: 

Alsouls Coll: 

Samuell Fisher. Hen: Birkehead. 

John Win. Charles Edwards. 

Universitie Coll: 
Henry Willis, Butler. 

Trinitie Coll: 

Mathew Skinner. William Radford. 

Walter Ettricke. 

Junii 14, 1648. 

Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 
Universitie of Oxori. 

Ordered : That the persons abovenamed, who are certified to this 
Committee by the Visitors not to have submitted to the authoritie 
of Parliament in this Visitation, be removed, and deprived from 
their places in their respective Colledges, and expelled from the 
Universitie. 

Concordat cum Originali, FKANC: ROUSE. 

RA: AUSTEN. 



136 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 27, 1648. [By the Visitors! . 

(P. 149.) L J 

June 27, 1648. 

Ordered by the Visitors: That the Belman of the Universitie be 
forbidden to goe about in such manner as was heretofore used 
before or at the funerall of any Members of the Universitie. a 

June 27. 1648. 
An Order prohibi tinge sale of the wood belonginge to Alsoules 

Colledge. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon hereby require you 
stricktly to prohibite and hinder the cuttinge, sellinge, and carryinge 
away of any wood or underwoode belonginge to Alsoules Colledge 
in Oxon upon any pretence whatsoever, and to returne the names 
of such as presume to cutt, sell, or carrie away any woods, or 
lycence any person or persons to carrie away any woods that is 
already cutt, unto us the Visitors of the Universitie aforesaid. 
And you are hereby required and enabled to commaund the former 
woodman, who consented to the sale of any woods belongeing to 
the Colledge aforesaid, to repaire to Oxford and pay in all moneyes 
(which hee hath receaved for any wood or underwood) unto Dr. 
Palmer, Warden of Alsoules, accordinge to an Order of the Lords 
and Commons assembled in Parliament bearinge date the 21 of 
Aprill, 1648. And hereof you, and euerie of you respectively, are 
not to faile, as you will answere the contrary at your perill. 

To George Becke entrusted with the oversight (for preserva- 
tion) of all woods and underwood, copses and woodlands 
belonginge to Alsoules Colledge in Oxon. 

a " This was purposely to prevent the solemnity that was to he performed at Dr. 
Radcliffe's funeral, lately dead. For it must be known that it hath beene the 
custom, time out of mind, that when any head of house, doctor, or master of consider- 
able degree, was to be buried, the University bellman was to put on the gown and 
formalities of the person defunct, and with his bell go into every College and Hall, 
and there make open proclamation (after two tings with his bell): That forasmuch 
as God had been pleased to take out of the world such a person, he was to give 
notice to all persons of the University that on such a day, and at such an hour, he 
was solemnly to be buried," &c. (Annals.) No traces of these customs have survived. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 137 

June 29, 1648. , t 

(.r. 150.) 

Whereas by severall Orders of the right honorable the Committee 
of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie of 
Oxford : It hath beene resolved, That all and everie person and 
persons, whose names are underwritten, be deprived and removed 
from their respective places in their severall Colledges, and expelled 
the Universitie for their high contempt of the authoritie of Parlia- 
ment: And the execution of the Orders aforesaid have beene 
referred to us the Visitors of this Universitie : 

Wee doe therefore hereby require all and everie the persons 
whose names are underwritten forthwith to remove accordingly. 

And in case any person or persons refuse to obey and remove, 
the Souldiery of this Garison are, by Order of the Lords and 
Commons aforesaid, desired to cause the said Orders to be put in 
execution. 

Christ- Church. 

Ric: Howe. Thomas Terrent. 

Walter Dayrell, Ric: Allestrey. 

Ralphe Towneson. Mr. John Kinge, Auditor, 
John Caricke. non-appearance. 

Giles Waringe. 

Magdalen Colledge. 

Abraham Forman. Andrew Searles. 

Mr. Lawe. Mr. Duncombe. 

Mr. Drope. Tho: Home. 

Hughe Holden. James Browne. 

John Taylor. Mr. Boughton. 

Tho: Pierce. Geo: Alexander. 

N: Childs. Tho: Clutterbooke. 

Edward Eaton, A:B: John Drake. 

H: Yerbury. John Slade Cooke. 

CAMD. SOC. T 



138 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 29, 1648. J esus Colledge. 

Mr. Flower. 

Wadham Colledge. 
Mr. Pyne. 

Lincolne Colledge. 
Mr. Webberley. 

Pembrooke Colledge. 
Mr. Bowles. 

(P. 151.) Exeter Colledge. 

Hen: Tozer. Jo: Barbone. 

Jo: Bigwood [Bidgood]. William Webber. 

Jo: Bery. Robert Teige. 

Alhoides Colledge. 

Hen: Barker. Hugh Boham. 

Jo: Middleton. Mr. Fisher. 

Merton Colledge. 

Mr. Broade. Mr. Owen. 

Mr. Leigh. 

Brase Nose Colledge. 

Byrom Eaton. Ric: Eaud. 

Ralphe Rawson. 

Oriell Colledge. 
Mr. Duncombe. 

St: Jo: Coll: 
Tho: Winyard, Ba: Art. Edmund Tilsley, M.A. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 139 

Baliall Colledge. 
Mr. Feidinge. S r Clement. 

Corpus Christi Colledge. 

Mr. Stratford. Tymothy Shute. 

Mr. Sanderson. Gamaliell Clarkeson. 

Trinity Colledge. 

Sir Banger. Mathew Skinner. 

Mr. Box. Walter Ettricke. 

Sir Pownall. "William Bad ford. 

New Colledge. 

Mr. Lucas. Mr. Henry Barker. 

Mr. Gardiner Mr. Rowlandson. 

An Order prohibitinge an Election in Exeter Colledge. a June 29, 1648. 

[Exeter.] 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, doe hereby stricktly inhibite 
and forbid all and everie of the Fellowes of Exeter Colledge from 
assemblinge togeather to make any election, or any Fellow or 
Fellowes, Scholar or Scholars into the Society or Colledge aforesaid, 
upon any plea or pretence whatsoever, as they will Answere the 
contempt of severall Orders and Ordinances of Parliament. 
To Mr. Martine, Senior Fellow upon the 
place in Exeter Colledge. 

a This and the following Order were issned in order to prevent Elections of 
Scholars, which should, by Statute, be made the next day. With reference to the 
first, Mr. Tozer, who had been expelled on May 26, was now imprisoned for refusing 
to surrender the College keys and books, but was afterwards released on condition 
that the said keys and books should not be conveyed out of the College. Decisive 
orders were necessary; for on this very day, June 29, Dr. Radcliffe having died 
three days previously, "the Society [of Brasenose], takeing no notice that the 
Visitors had entered Mr. Greenwood Principal, put up a citation on their door, as by 



140 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



June 30, 1648. 

(P. 152.) 
[Wadham.] 



June 30, 1648. 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, doe hereby stricktly inhibite 
and forbid all and every of the Fellowes of Wadham Colledge from 
assemblinge togeather to make any election of any Fellow or 
Fellowes, Scholar or Scholars into the Society or Colledge aforesaid, 
upon any plea or pretence whatsoever, as they will Answere the 
contempt of severall Orders and Ordinances of Parliament. 

To the Subwarden or Senior Fellow, and the rest 
of the Fellowes of Wadham Colledge. 



[Lincoln.] June 30, 1648. 

Whereas Mr. John Taylor hath beene recommended to us by a 
spetiall order of the Committee of Lords and Commons for the 
Reformation of the Universitie of Oxofi, that hee might be elected 
and admitted unto some voyd Fellowshipp in Lincolne Colledge : 

Wee, the Visitors of the Universitie, with the consent of the 
Rector of Lincolne Colledge, have elected and doe hereby order, 
that the said Mr. Taylor be forthwith upon sight hereof admitted 
into the Fellowshippe of Mr. Houghton, late Fellow of Lincolne 
Colledge, in Oxofi, and require Dr. Hoode and all the Fellowes of 
the said Colledge for to admitt the said Mr. Taylor as aforesaid, 
that hee may actually enjoy all and singuler the profitts and 
priviledges of a Fellow in the Society aforesaid ; and that this our 

Statute they were required, to summon the Fellows to election. The Visitors there- 
upon send for Mr. Thomas Sixsmith, and two more Fellows of that House, to 
command them to surcease and submit to their new Principal, Mr. Greenwood ; but 
they gave them fair words, went home, and after four days choose among themselves, 
in a Fellow's chamber, at the west end of the old library, Mr. Thomas Yate, one of 
the Society." (Annals.) The right of election was vested in the six senior Fellows> 
whose names were Ralph Byrom, Thomas Church, Edmund Highfield, Robert 
Jones, John Newton, and Thomas Sixsmith. Yate was immediately superseded by 
Greenwood ; but at the Restoration the election was held to be valid, and the 
" Fellows' Principal " was " restored." See Introduction. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 141 

Order may be produced for the benefite of Mr. Taylor upon all June 30, 1648. 
occasions, wee require the Rector and Fellowes aforesaid to cause 
this our Order to be entred into the Register of the said Colledge. 



July 5, 1648. (P. 153.) 

Resolved, that Dr. Hoyle, a Dr. Stanton, b Mr. Greenewood, c 
Mr. Wilkins, d Mr. Langley, 6 Mr. Cornish/ Dr. Palmer, g Proctor 
Crosse, h Proctor Button, 1 Mr. Hancocke, j Mr. Owen, k Mr. Copley, 1 
and Mr. [Anthony] Clifford, 111 be desired to be a Committee for the 
examination of all such as are candidates for any Fellowshipp, 
Scholarship, or other place in this Universitie, and that any three 
of them (soe some Head of an House or one of the Proctors be 
present) have power to approve such as they shall judge fitt to be 
preferred. 



July 5, 1648. 

Ordered, that Lodowike Mason beinge expelled from Magdalen 
Colledge and this Universitie by order of the Lords and Commons 
for the Reformation of Oxford, doe forthwith remove and depart 
from the Colledge aforesaid and this Universitie. 

a Master of University and Professor of Divinity. b President of Corpus. 

Principal of Brasenose. d Warden of Wadham. 
e Of Pembroke College, one of the seven Preachers of 1646. 

f Of New Inn Hall, one of the seven Preachers. * Warden of All Souls. 

h Professor of Divinity, 1648. ' Prebendary of Ch. Ch. and Public Orator. 

1 Of Exeter College, a Delegate to the Visitors. 

k Of Lincoln College, a Delegate to the Visitors. 

1 Of Merton College, a Delegate to the Visitors. 

m Of Exeter College, a Delegate to the Visitors. 

This was a very competent Committee. That there was a temporary necessity for 
superseding the Statutes must, from the point of view of the Visitors, be admitted. 
The results justified the selection and the subsequent action of the Committee. 



142 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 5, 1648. July 5, 1648. 

Ordered, that Mr. Proctor of Exeter Colledge be suspended from 
all power, priviledge, and profitts of his Fellowshipp, for his 
contempt of the authoritie of Parliament in not appearinge before 
us the Visitors upon sufficient summons. 

(P. 154.) July 6, 1648. 

Ordered, that since Mr. Chibnall, formerly of Magdalen Colledge, 
is put out of his Fellowship for his contempt of the authority of 
Parliament, hee is thereby disabled from receavinge any rents 
belonginge to the Colledge, and to have nothinge to doe with any- 
thinge of the aforesaid Colledge. 

It is therefore ordered that all Tenants, Baileiffes, Woodmen, 
Collectors, and other officers belonginge to Magdalen Colledge, be 
kept from cominge to Mr. Chibnall. 

To the Provost Marshall of the 
Garrison of Oxon. 

July 6, 1648. 

Ordered by the Visitors that the Buttery Bookes of everie 
Colledge be brought to us forthwith upon sight hereof. 

(P. 155.) The Answere of Tho: Sutton, of Corpus Christi Colledge,* 

SSI"*" July, 7, 1648. 

It is not any guilty feare of an enquiry to be made into my 
actions by the established law of the land, but only a conscientiouse 
regard to those Colledge Statutes which by solemne oath I stand 
engaged inviolably to observe, that necessitates my refusall of 
submission to this your present Visitation. 

Cor: C: Coll: J O s: Barber, his Answere: The severall Statutes of our house (to 

an inviolable observation of -which I am bound by oath) expresly 

forbiddinge me, I cannot comply with this Visitation without 

open violence to my Judgement and conscience. 

a This is the list of answers mentioned at p. 131, as "not yet returned" on June 6. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 143 

John Fisher, of Queenes Colledge. July 5, 1848. 

This is the Answere of me John Fisher (Master of Arts and [For] more 
Chaplaine of Queen's Colledge), and which I shall acknowledge as [Q ueen ' sCo11 -] 
myne, that I cannot without perjury submitt to this Visitation, pa: 170. 
And therefore I will not submitt. Ita est. 

JOHN FISHER. 

I, Thomas Johnson, beinge fully resolved, doe willingely submitt Corp: Chr: 
to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation, and doe humbly j * : 14 164g 
acknowledge my former error in denyinge to submitt hereunto. [Interpolated 

THO: JOHNSON. 

I doe hartily submitt to this present Visitati'on. Corp: Chr: 

JAMES HAYES. 

I submitt to this Visitation. Corp: chr: 

WILLIAM WINDHAM. Coll: 

July 7, 1648. a (P. 156.) 

Whereas, by severall Orders of the right honorable Committee of 
Lords and Commons for reformation of the Universitie of Oxford, 
it hath beene resolved, That all and everie person and persons 
whose names are underwritten be deprived and removed from their 
respective places in their severall colledges, and expelled the Uni- 
versitie, for their high contempt of the authoritie of Parliament. 
And the execution of the Orders aforesaid have beene referred to 
us the Visitors of this Universitie : Wee doe therefore and for other 

a Two days previous to this Order, on July 5, an Order from the Lieutenant- 
Governor of Oxford was puhlished hy beat of drum at every College, to the effect 
that "in consequence of divers affronts to the soldiery of this garrison, as firing at 
the guard, and causing alarums in the city," all whose names had been publicly 
posted up as expelled should depart that day from Oxford on pain of being treated 
as spies. On July 11, the Notice of July 5 having been repeated at each College by 
a guard of soldiers and beat of drum, and supported by the Visitors' Order of July 7, 
''the most part obeyed, but some undergoing the brunt were imprisoned, whilst 
others absconded for several weeks." (Annals.) It is here that Wood makes the 
reflections on the harshness of the clerical Visitors, as compared with the laymen, 
which have been noticed in the Introduction. 



144 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 7, 1648. sufficient reasons hereby require all and every the persons whose 
names are underwritten forthwith to remove accordingely. And 
in case any person or persons refuse to obey, and remove, the 
souldiery of this Garrison and by Order of the Lords and Commons 
aforesaid desired to cause the said Orders to be put in execution. 

New Colledge. 

Mr. Jo: Beesley. Mr. Tho: Gillingeham. 

Mr. Robert Bainham. Mr. Robert Boman. 

Mr. John Dummer. Mr. Christopher Turpin. 

Mr. Ric: Halloway. Mr. Gilbert Withers. 

,Mr. Ambrose Blake. Mr. Hen: Complin. 

Mr. Gilbert Coles. Mr. Anthony Robinson. 

Mr. Hen: Hobs. Mr. Tho: Alexander. 

Mr. John Price. Mr. Hen : Aylworth. 
Mr. John Marshall. 

Christ Church. 

Mr. Staninough. Mr. Ric: Hill. 

Mr. Dolbin. Mr. Robert Whitehall. 

Mr. Tho: Hill. Mr. Christ: Lowder 

Mr. Geo: Smith. Mr. Sam. Jackson. 

Mr. John Hilman. 

Brase Nose Colledge. 
Mr. William Surges. 

Magdalen Colledge. 

Mr. Walter Stonehouse. Mr. Hen: Jones. 

Mr. Jo: Nurse. Mr. Francis Drope. 

Mr. Jo: Worthingeton. Mr. William Collis. 

Mr. Coppinger. S r Deane, Bacc: Art: 

Mr. Phillips. Mr. Humphrey Symson. 

Mr. Ric : Bartlett. Mr. William Dureton. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 145 

Universitie Coll edge. July 7, 1048. 

Mr. Obadia Walker. Mr. Tho: Silvester.* 

Mr. Hen: Watkins. 

Queenes Colledge. 

Mr. Pitt. Mr. Peirson. 

Mr. Charles Musgrave. James Buchanan. 

S r Gibson. 

St. John's Colledge. 

David Hichins, B.A. Mr. Hen: Osbaston. 

Mr. Edward Slater. Wm: Taylor, Butler. 

Stephen Pemble. 

Oriell Colledge. 

Mr. Kic: Sanders." Mr. Phillip Bouch. 

Mr. Sherinton Sheldon. Mr. Hen: Chamberlaine. 

Jesus Colledge. 

Mr. Tho: Wilkins. Mr. Geo: Evans. 

Mr. John Hughes. Mr. James Penry. 

Mr. William Price. Mr. Theodorett Bassett. 

Corpus Christi Colledge. 

Mr. Tho: Drury. Mr. Tho: Teakle. 

Mr. Jo: Betts. Mr. James Metford. 

Mr. Geo: Halsted. Mr. William Stampe. 

Mr. Geo: Kinde. Mr. Jo: Stapleton. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Hen: Glover. 
Mr. Jo: Clarke. 

a " Soon after restored on his compliance." (Annals.) 

b " Afterwards complying, was restored to his Fellowship in 1652 " (Ib.); but by 
the College books he does not appear to have been restored till 1660. 
" Complying, was restored to his Fellowship 1650." (Ib.) 
CAMD. SOC. U 



146 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



, July 22, 1648. 

[Interpolated 

in P- 157 -1 These 3 were expelled. 

S r Jennings, ~| 

Tymothy Parker, I- Corp. Chr. a 

Mr. Fulman, J 

(P. 158.) A mis et modis to Mr. Gilbert, Fellow of Lincolne Colledge. 

July 12, 1648. 

Whereas you have beene cited by severall summons and per- 
sonally sought by our Officer, who could not finde you, wee the 
Visitors of this Universitie, doe now cite you Omnibus viis et modis, 
to make your personall appearance before us on Fryday next, at 
the Warden's Lodgings in Merton Colledge, betweene 8 and 11 of 
tne clocke in the fourenoone, to Answere to such Questions as 
shalbe demaunded of you. 

July 12, 1648. A Summons to all the Members of the Universitie who have not as 

yet given in their Answers. 

Whereas severall summons have beene set up to cite all and everie 
Officer and Member of this Universitie, and the respective Colledges 
and Halls therein, to appeare before us, and yet divers have not as 
yet appeared: these are stricktly to require all who have not as yet 
appeared and given in their Answers to us, to make their personall 
appearance before us at the Warden's Lodgings in Merton Colledge, 
upon Fryday next, beinge the fourteenth of this instant July, 
betweene the hours of 8 and 1 1 in the fourenoone. And in case any 
that are now in the Universitie shall goe forth of towne, or els stay 
in towne, and not personally appeare before us at the tyme prefixed, 

a Eulman and Parker had " blotted " and " torn out " the name of Dr. Stanton, 
the new President of Corp. Chr. Coll., which the Visitors, on July 11, had entered in 
the Buttery Book, vice Dr. Newlin. William Fulman was the well-known anti- 
quarian. (Ath. Oxon. ii. 624.) Wood remarks that these three Corpus men were 
now the only persons expelled for some months. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 147 

wee shall forthwith returne their names to the Committee of Lords July 12, 1648. 
and Commons for the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxford, 
and certifie that they refuse to appeare before us. 



The Answere of Tho: Brathwayt, of Queenes Colledge : ( 

3 ' July 13 th , 1648. 

What the authentic of Parliament is, or how farre it extends, I 0= Coll: 
professe seriously I am ignorant: for this Visitation, as it is beyond Answers [see] 
my power, soe likewise it is beyond my will to oppose it in relation pa: 
to my selfe, seeinge I hope I am able to give a good accompt of my 
actions before any impartiall authoritie. 

John Bayley, New Colledge, Soc: I am expressly bound by the N: Coll: 
Statutes and Oathes of New Colledge, whereof I am a Member, in 
noe wise to admitt of any Visitors who are actuall Members of this 
Universitie, and therefore humbly conceive if this obligation which 
lyes upon me were presented to the honorable Houses of Parliament 
they would not require my submission to the Visitation. 

The Answere of Jo: Hill, Senior Cooke of C.C.C. : C: C: C: 

Sirs, if it please you I shall acknowledge Dr. Staunton as 
President put in by the authoritie of both Houses of Parliament, 
but, under favor, I cannot acknowledge him as President accordinge 
to the Statutes of the Colledge, for that I am altogether ignorant of 
them. 

The Answere of Henry Price, Junior Cooke of C.C.C. : 

Sirs, If it please you I shall acknowledge Dr. Staunton as 
President put in by the authority of both Houses of Parliament: 
But, under favor, I cannot acknowledge him as President accordinge 
to the Statutes of the Colledge, for that I am altogether ignorant of 
them. 

The same Answere, verbatim, is given by John Parne, Butlor C: C: C: 
of C.C.C. 



148 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 13, 1618. And by Tho: Seymor, Manciple C.C.C. 
And by Tho: Booden, Portor of C.C.C. 
C: C: C: And by William Harrison, Groome of C.C.C. 

(P. 171.) Edward Hisrhfeild : I doe with all humility acknowledge that I 
Brasenose * 

Coll: understand not what the power of Parliament is in Order to the 

Visitation of this Universitie, yet accordinge to that light which 
God hath given mee, my endeavor and care hath beene hitherto soe 
to demeane my selfe as one who desires to render to everie one 
their due: my conscience is cleane from actinge to the prejudice of 
that power, soe farre as made knowne to mee in any perticuler. If 
any thinge may bee informed against mee (which I hope cannot) 
I am within the power, and under the commaund, of those who are 
appoynted Visitors, to be delt with accordinge to their discretion. 



ul Vf,' i 648 ' Rich: Higgs, of Queenes Colledge: I shall with all readinesse 
u: Colledge. ... 

and humility submitt to the Visitors of this Universitie, ordayned 

by the honorable Houses of Parliament, as farre as possibly I may 
without prejudice to my conscience. 

Bras-Nose I will either actively or passively submitt to the authoritie of 

Parliament in this Visitation soe farre as the Lawes of God, the 
Lawes of the land, the Statutes of the Universitie, and my owne 
conscience will give mee leave. JASPER SCOLES, 

Commoner of Brazen Nose Coll. 

Ch: Ch : J ? John Busby, Student of Christ Church, will (as I am bound 

by the Law of God and man) reverence and obay my superiors and 
Governors, and likewise observe those sound Statutes which are 
enjoyned by the place, which Orders if I shall peremptorily necglect, 
I will undergoe any ingenuouse punishment which you (as I doubt 
not, discreetly and moderately) shall inflict upon mee. 

Mag: Coll: I have to my utmost abilities endeavoured the understandinge of 

this Question, and am sufficiently instructed from the sufficiency of 
others, not to lett my affections soe farre prevaile over my judgment 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 149 

as not to be desirous to conceive the best of this Visitation, but yet July 14, 1648. 
I am not convinced that I can doe it with a good conscience in ^ P< 172 '^ 
regard of the oathes I have formerly taken. After conviction I am 
ready to submitt. RiCHf BASKETT, Art: Mag: 

E. Coll: Mag: 

I, Tho: Lewis, Student of St. Jo: Bapt: Coll: doe in conscience Jo: Bapt: Coll 
submitt to this Visitation authorised by authoritie of Parliament. 

Benjamyn Cooper: 1 shall not deny or oppose the power of Par- Merton Coll: 
liament, but, not knowinge what their power is in the Universitie 
concerninge this Visitation, I cannot give any positive Answere to 
this Question. 

Tho: Fiefeild, Butler of Christ Church: Christ Church 

I shalbe ready to submitt, soe farre as doth concerne mee, in the 
place I am to officiate. 

Tho: Hawkes, Butler of Christ Church for Bread : Ch: Ch: 

I doe submitt to this Visitation. 

Edward Farmer, Fellow of New Colledge : New Coll. 

Whereas I conceive myselfe obliged by many perticuler Oathes, 
expressed in our Colledge Statutes, for the Non-Submission to this 
present Visitation, I hope you will judge soe favorably in this case 
that my Answere doth not tend to obstinacy, but meerely to con- 
science. 

Geo: Scriven, Bacc: Art. Ch: Church. 

I will submitt to this Visitation, soe farre as I can without 
prejudice to my conscience with those former oathes which I have 
taken. 

Samuell Speede, Student of Christ Church: I beinge bound by Ch: Church, 
oath and conscience to acknowledge noe other Visitor of this 
Universitie but the Kinge, cannot without breach of both submitt. 



150 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Exeter Coll: 

Bernard 

Gealard. 



' 16 f 8< I doe fully resolve to obay all Orders whatsoever are or shalbe 

Ch: Church. . i t . TT i -r i 

instituted in this Universitie, and I doe not doubt but my behaviour 
wilbe such that noe exceptions shall by any meanes be taken. 

JOHN BROWNE. 
(P. 173.) Tho: Cole : I doe submitt to all my Governors, and shall desire 

C: Church. .-,.- 

that my lire and conversation past may be examined by you the 

Visitors, and shall soe demeane myselfe, that noe exceptions shalbe 
taken agains my behaviour. 

New Coll: John Maylard: I conceive that I cannot submitt to this Visita- 

tion, by reason of divers oathes taken by mee publiquely in the 
Universitie and my owne private Colledge. 

This proposition is soe generall and large, and beinge as yet a 
stranger to the proceedings of the Visitation and Universitie, for 
the present I cannot retourne any other Answere then this: I will 
submitt to the power of Parliament in the Visitation of Oxford soe 
farre as lawfully I may, if it be agreeable to the lawes of the 
land, not contrary to the Statutes, liberties, and priviledges of this 
Universitie, or against the Statutes of Exofi Colledge, the Oath of 
Supremacy or allegeance, the Protestation, or the Oathes which I 
have formerly taken, either in the Universitie, or Colledge, which I 
am bound in conscience inviolably to observe till I am pers waded 
in conscience to the contrary. 

BERNARD GEALAKD, 

Fellow of Exeter Colledge. 

J: Walter, Manciple of Christ Church : 
1 doe submitt to whatsoever shall concerne mee in the office I 
am to officiate. 

WadhamColl- Seeinge many learned men (which are better skilled in the 
Richard Mayo. j aweg an d Statutes of the Universitie then myselfe) have given a 

denyall to the proposed Question, I, followinge their rules, have 

thought fitt to deny it my selfe. 



Chr. Church. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 151 

John Riland : I, John Riland Fellow of Magdalen Colledge July 14, 16-48. 
doe submitt to this Visitation. Ma g ; Coll: 

Rich: Higgs: I shall, with all readinesse and humility, submitt Queens Coll: 
to the Visitors of this University ordained by the honorable Houses 
of Parliament as farre as possibly I may without preiudice to my 
conscience. 

Edward Beare, Student of Christ Church : Chr: Church. 

I cannot, without manifest breach of severall former oathes, 
submitt to this Visitation. 

John Bartin, Bachlor of Arts: Doe submitt to this Visitation. Exeter Coll: 

Tho: Throkmorton: I will not be soe traiterous to my Kinge as Bal: Coll: 
to acknowledge the pretended right and authority of his enemies. 

John Gillifloure: When I am put into my place againe which I 
have formerly enjoyed, whereby I am made a Member of the 
Universitie, I shall humbly submitt to the authority of Parliament 
in this Visitation. 

I, Symon Broadwater, Cooke of Oriell Colledge, submitt to the Oriell Coll: 
authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

I, Edward Hall, Baily of Christ Church, or Carter, doe not ch: Church, 
question the power of Parliament, but doe acknowledge their 
power. 

William Collier, Butler : I referre myselfe to the Master and Pembrooke 
Fellowes, and will submitt as farre as it concernes mee in my place. 

Tho: Turner, Cooke, giveth the same Answere. Pembr. Coll. 

William Flaxney, Barber: New Coll: 

Soe farre as I may, without breach of my oath," I shall humbly 
submitt to this Visitation. 

Fran: Yonge: No: 8 beinge the day of the annuall Visitation of Oriel Col: 
the publique Library (where the Vice-Chancellor, Reg: Professors, 



152 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 14, 1648. and Proctors of this Universitie are the Visitors), I shalbe very 
wi Hinge to make my humble Answere to whatsoever charge shalbe 
laid against me; in the interim I shalbe ready to make Answere to 
whatsoever shalbe objected against mee. 

I doe submit to the power of Parliament in this Visitation. 

THO: FIFIELD, Butler. 



Chr: Ch: 



NT 



Exet: Coll: 



Ex: Coll: 



Ch: Church. 



Oriell Coll: 



Merton Coll: 



Ch: Church. 



Brasen Nose 
Coll: 

Brasen Nose 
Coll: 



Jeremy Oakeley : As farre as it may consist with Oxford Articles, 
and the many oathes which I have taken as a Member of this 
Kingedome, this Universitie, and my Colledge, I shall submitt to 
this Visitation. 

Edw: Serle: I doe humbly submitt to the authority of Parlia- 
ment in this present Visitation. 

William Hardinge, Cooke of Exeter Colledge : 
I understand not the Visitation, nor the power of it: they are 
matters too high for me. 

Charles Anslow: I Charles Anslow, Student of Christ-Church, 
cannot submitt to this Visitation without perjury: I say I cannot. 

Tho: Weston: I doe submitt myselfe to the power of this 
Visitation. 

Samuell Clarke: I submitt to the power of the Parliament in 
this Visitation. 

William Carpender: I shall be willinge to have my life and 
manners examined by the Visitors appoynted by the Parliament, 
and doe premise that I will demeane myselfe civilly, actinge 
nothing prejuditiall to their proceedings. 

Ralphe Byrom : I dare not submitt to this Visitation, because 
whatsoever is not of faith is sin. 

Tho: Church: I am not satisfied how I can submitt to this 
Visitation, without incurringe manifest perjury. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 153 

Robert Cripps : I submitt to the authority of Parliament for this July 14, 1648. 
Visitation. Mert:Coll: 

Edward Dickinson : I doe submitt to this Visitation. Mert: Coll: 

Josias Prickett: I will submitt to the legal proceedings in your Mert; Coll: 
Visitation. 

I, William Bleaw, Sexton of Christ Church, doe submitt to the Ch: Church, 
authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Geo: Dixon : I doe submitt to the Government of this Visitation. 

William Wilkins: I, William Wilkins, one of the Students, Ch: Church. 
Butler of Christ-Church, doe submitt to the power of Parliament 
and this Visitation. 

I, Rich: Porter, one of the Porters of Christ- Church, doe submitt (P. 176.) 
to the power of Parliament and this Visitation. 

Edward Stanley: I humbly desire I may not be forced to submitt New Coll: 
to the power of Parliament in this Visitation, which if I should 
doe as I conceive I should be guilty of perjury. 

Hen: Hawley: I referre my selfe to the Articles concerninge the Mert: Coll: 
surrender of Oxon. 

Jo: Kingsley: I humbly conceive that I manifested my sub- Pemb: Coll: 
mission by waitinge on the Worshipfull Mr. Langley, as present 
Master of Pembrooke Colledge, to whom 1 shall for the future as 
formerly acknowledge myselfe servant, beinge Member of the said 
Colledge. 

Hugh Willis: I humbly desire that I may not be forced toN ew Coll: 
perjure my selfe by submission to the authoritie for this Visitation, 
which to doe were to violate my conscience. 

Hen: Nopes, Butler of New Coll: New Coll: 

I submitt to the power of Kinge and Parliament. 

CAMD. SOC. X 



154 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 14, 1648. 
Erase Nose 
Coll: 



New Coll: 



New Coll: 



New Coll: 



William Brewer, Com: I will submitt to the authoritie of Parlia- 
ment in this Visitation, soe farre as lawfully I may, beinge guiltlesse 
of the breach of the lawes of God, the lawes of the land, and the 
Statutes of this Universitie. 

Symon Coleman, Organist: 

I conceive myselfe obliged in conscience, as a Member of our 
Colledge, not to submitt to this present Visitation. 

Theodore Goulston, Socius: The Universitie oathes and oath 
taken to our Colledge Statutes, I conceive, doe binde me not to 
submitt to this Visitation. 

John Newbery, Bacc: Art: 

I conceive that the Universitie oathes, and oath taken to our 
Colledge Statutes, doe binde mee that I cannot submitt to this 
Visitation. 

(P. 177.) Hen: Stringer : As I belonge to New Colledge, I concurre in 

Answere with the Society of that house, that I cannot by our locall 
Statutes submitt to any Visitors that are actually of the University. 
As I have a capacity in the University I have labored to informe 
myselfe concerninge the Question proposed, but by reason of some 
doubtfull terms in the Question I cannot yet satisfie my conscience 
what to Answere, and therefore I humbly desire a little longer 
respite to consider. 

Chr: Church. Eichard Watkins, in Art: Magist: 

I doe wholy submitt to the legall authoritie of Parliament, and 
shall give an Accompt of my Actions unto the persons appoynted 
(by the said authority) to receave it. 

New Coll: Fran: Beyley : The oath which I have taken (as beinge a Member 

of New Colledge) doth directly bind mee not to submitt to your 
Visitation. 

Ch: Church. Fran: Markham: As I am a Member of this Universitie I referre 
you to the Delegates for my Answer. As I am a Member and 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 155 

Student of Christ Church I have sought to satisfie my judgement, Joly 14, 1648. 
but as hitherto I am not satisfied (since our Kinge is our only 
Visitor) that I may in conscience submitt. 

John Vincent : I, John Vincent, Student of Christ Church, am Ch: Church, 
not of such ripenesse of judgement as to discerne all that may be 
required of mee in the Question, but in this, as in all other, I am 
conformable to whatsoever the publique lawes of this Realme shall 
require or command ; and thus much I know, I am to obay my 
superiours, wherefore whatsoever Government shalbe established in 
this Universitie I will not oppose, as also such Governours as shalbe 
over the Colledge in which I shall reside I will behave my selfe 
under, without offence to any ; for I came hither only to employ my 
tyme in studyinge good learninge and religion ; if I doe otherwise 
I am lyable to whatsoever punishment my misdemeanors shall 
deserve. 

Jo: Porter, Art: Bac: (P. 178.) 

I doe submitt to this present Visitation soe farre forth as it is c ^; 

agreeable to the lawes of the Kingedome, the Statutes of this 

Universitie, and consistent with the King's just right. 

Rich: Witt: I conceive that I am bound by the oathes taken to New Coll: 
the Universitie and our Colledge Statutes not to submitt to this 
your Visitation. 

I, Nicholas Jay, Baskett-bearer, of Ch: Church, doe not know Ch: Ch: 
what belongs to the Visitation of the Universitie, but doe ac- 
knowledge a Governor, and will endeavor to doe my service which 
belongs to me to doe. 

I, John Browne, Students' Cooke, of C: Chur: doe not know what Ch: Chun 
belongs to the Visitation of the Universitie, but I doe acknowledge 
a Governor, and will endeavor to doe my service which belongs 
to me. 



156 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July u, 1648. Tho: Hudson, Head Cooke of Christ Church: I doe submitt to 
the authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

Hart Hall. Kobert Harper, Cooke of Hart Hall: I doe submitt to the authority 

of Parliament in this Visitation. 

New Coll. Eich: Pepper, Under Butler of New Colledge: I cannot in con- 

science submitt to this present Visitation unlesse I should render 
myselfe guilty of perjury. 

Christ Church. I, John Tucker, humbly submitt to this Visitation, and crave 
your favors in preferringe me as a poore Schollar. 

Wadham Coll. These are to certify that I, Hen: Bartlet, Master of Arts, and of 
Sept. 29, 1648. t ^ e g oc i ety o f Wadham Colledge, doe cheerfully submitt unto the 
power of Parliament in this present Visitation. 

[Do.] I, Robert Webber, doe cheerfully and willingly submitt to the 

power of Parliament in this Visitation, which I had before this 
expressed had not I necessarily been detained in the country. 

No [v.] 9. [Do.] Josias Banger: I will submitt to the authority of Parliament in 

[Mag: Coll:] ^Visitation. 

(P. 179.) William Clunn, one of the Clerks of New Colledge : I cannot in 
conscience submitt to this Visitation, now present, unlesse I should 
perjure myselfe. 

New Coll: John Hungarford, Ba: Divinity: 

I am expresly bound by the Statutes and oathes of New Col- 
ledge, whereof I am a Member, in noe wise to admitt of any Visitors 
who are actually Members of this University. And I humbly con- 
ceive, if this obligation which lyes upon mee were represented to 
the honorable Houses of Parliament, they would not require any 
submission to your Visitation. 

Mag: Hall. Walter Powell: I doe freely submitt to the authority of Parlia- 

ment, and to this present Visitation in Oxford, beinge an Under- 
graduate in Magdalene Hall. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 157 

Samuell Smith, Fellow of Queenes Colledge: July 14, 1648. 

Consideringe that the high and honorable Houses of Parliament Sam: Smith, 
have declared that they will constantly endeavor to preserve and 
defend his Majestie's person and authority, and that they have not 
any thoughts or intentions to diminish his Majestie's just power and 
greatnesse, I shall with all readinesse and humility submitt myselfe 
to the power of Parliament in this present Visitation, in order 
to a happy and much desired Reformation both in Church and 
State. 

> 

William Huntley : I doe submitt to and acknowledge the authority Queens Coll: 

of this present Visitation. 

Hen: Huntley : I willingly submitt to the authority of this Q= Coli: 
present Visitation. 

Tho: Fletcher : I feare I shall offend against the power of Parlia- Mag: Coll: 
ment if I submitt to these Visitors, because they are all, or most of 
them, Clergie men. 

Robert Clerke: I submitt to this Visitation accordinge to the Mag: Coll: 
Articles of Oxon. 

July 15. 

I doe acknowledge you to be Visitours of this University so farre Cookes. 
as this Visitation is not repugnant to the oathes which I have taken 
to be true to the King and the Statutes of our Colledge. 

THOMAS TOMS, 
Undercooke of New Colledge. 

The same answeare is given by Bartholomew Finch, Cook of New Coll: 
New Colledge, and Edward Selwood, Cook of St. Johns. St: Johns Coll: 

Richard Dowley, Bac: Art: Demy of Mag: Coll: submits. Mag: Coll: 

George Porter, demy of Magd: Coll: doth submit. Mag: Coll: 

Tho: Welch doth submit; [the] Cooke of Trinity Coll: [Trinity.] 



158 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 14, 1648. 
Chr. Church. 



Mr. Babar: 

Quest: Do you submitt to this present Visitation by these 
Commissioners, which are sent by imediate authority of Parliament, 
to visit, regulate, and reforme this Universitie of Oxon, and all the 
Colledges and Halls therein? 

Doe you acknowledge my Lord of Pembrooke to be Chancellor 
of this Universitie, and Mr. Reynolds to be Dean of Christ Church 
and Vice-Chancellor of this Universitie, accordinge to the Ordinance 
of Parliament and recommendation of the Earle of Pembrooke, 
Chancellor of this Universitie ? 

To the Questions propounded unto me Apr: 3, 1648, I make 
this Answere, That I am not satisfied concerninge them, and there- 
fore humbly desire to be excused. JOHN BASER. 

Richard Mondy, Porter of Christ Church : 

I doe submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation. 

New Coll: I, Robert Townsend, Fellow of New Colledge, acknowledge the 

1648. ' power of Parliament in this present Visitation, and humbly submitt 
[Interpolated.] thereunto. 



(P. 181.) 
Chr: Church. 



(P. 190.) 



[Summary of foregoing (imperfect).]' 
Christ Church Colledge. 
Jo: Busby 
Geo: Scriven 
Sam: Speed 
Edw: Beare 
Fr: Markham 
Jo: Baber 
Jo: Walter 



Submitt. 



Tho: Cole 
Tho: Hudson 
Rich: Watkins 
Rich: Porter 
Will: Wilkins 
Edw: Hall 
Tho: Hawkes 
W m : Bleaw 
Geo: Dixon 

a Though evidently a summary of the preceding answers, several names do not 
appear. It has not been thought necessary to print the copy of these negative answers 
which appears on p. 212 of the Register. The only difference is that the name of 
Dr. Stringer is omitted in the latter place, he being dealt with separately. 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



159 



Magdalen Colledge. 

Jo: Ryland j 

Ric: Dowley > Submitt. 

Geo: Porter 



Ric: Baskett 
Tho: Fletcher 
Chr: Taylour 
W m : Heard 
Jo: Tuchin 



Neg: 



New Colledg 

Jo: Bayley 
Ed: Farmer 
Jo: Maylard 
W m : Flexney 
Jer: Oakeley, Cap: 
Ed: Stanley 
Hugh Willis, Cap: 
Hen: Nobes 
Symon Coleman 
Theodore Gulston 
Jo: Newberry 
Hen: Stringer, D r 
Fran: Bey ley 
Ric: Witt 
Ric: Pepper 
W m Clum, Clerke 
Jo: Hungerford 
Th: Toms 
Barth: Finch 



e. 



> Neg: 



Brase Nose Colledge. 



July 14, 1648. 



Edward Heighfeild 
Ral: Byrom 
Tho: Church 
Jo: Porter 
Wm: Brewer 
Jasper Scoles 



Neg. 



Oriell Colledge. 



(P. 19U 



Fran: Yonge: Neg. 
Symon Broadwater, 

Cooke 
Tho: Weston 



Submitt. 



Jo: Bapt: Coll. 

Edw: Selwood \ 
Goodwyn Swift ) Neg. 
W: Roy J 

Sam: Smith: Submitts. 



Pembrcoke Colledge. 



Oct. 2<, 1648. 
[Interpolated.] 



Wm: Collier 
Tho: Turner 
Kingsley 



Neg. 



160 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 14, 1648. Baylioll Colledge. 

Tho: Throckmorton : Neg. 



Trinity Colledge. 
Fran: Dod: Submitts. 



Exeter Colledge. 
Bernard Gealard } 
William Hardinge I 
Jo: Bartin ") 
Ed:Searle I Submitt ' 



(P. 213.) 



Merton Colledge. 

Sam: Clerke 
: Crips 



Edw: Dickenson 
Josias Pricket 
Hen: Hawley ] 
Ben: Cooper: Neg. 



Submit. 



Corp: Ch 
Tho: Sutton 
Jo: Barker 
Jo: Hill 
Hen: Price 
Jo: Parry 
Tho: Seymor 
Tho : Bowden 
Wm : Harrison 



Coll. 



Neg. 



Queens Colledge. 
Jo: Fisher "j 

Tho: Brathwayt ] 

Sam: Smith "j 

Wm. Huntley V Submit. 

Hen. Huntley I 



Magdalen Hall. 
Walter Powell : Submitts. 

Hart Hall. 
Robert Harper : Submitts. 



Aug 1, 1648. 
At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxon : 
Ordered : 

That the persons aforesaid, who are certified by the Visitors not 
to have submitted to the authorise of Parliament in the Visitation, 
be removed an d deprived from their places in their respective Col- 
ledges and Halls, and expelled the Universitie. 

FRAN: Rous. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 161 

[By the Visitors.] Jul 7 14 > 1648 - 

( P 192 } 

The Visitors desire Mr. Wilkinson to make report to the honora- 
ble Committee of Lords and Commons of these perticulers. 

1. That some they have ejected after they were actually removed 
have retourned againe into Oxofi, and that others doe stay neere 
about the towne to the danger of the place : and to desire some 
remeady. 

2. That some General Order be desired about places which are 
voyd otherwise than by ejection: As also about undue Elections 
which have beene made since the Parliament's inhibition. 

3. To complaine of conveyinge away of money es, plate, scales, 
evidences, registers, [rentalls] books of accompt, and other [like] [The words in 

1" 1*1 i n ~\ 11111 OTilCKCtS fll'C 

things which concerne the state of the severall colledges contrary additions in a 

to oathes and Statutes. c ,? y J (p ; 198 ? ) ' 

dated Aug. 4, 

4. To report the desires of the Visitors and Delegates of the which it has 
Universitie concerninge the Insignia, viz. : Bedles' staves and scales, thought* neces- 
and scales manuall, and of the Chancellor's Office. sary to print.] 

5. To present the names of such who have not yet appeared upon 
Summons of the Visitors [in this manner]. 

That severall Orders and Summons have beene made by the 

Visitors. 

1. May 26: That all schollars, officers, and members of this 
Universitie, of what ranke, degree, or quality soever then present 
in the Universitie should within 7 daies upon paine of expulsion 
bringe in a direct Answere to the Question whether they doe sub- 
mitt to the authority of Parliament in this Visitation. 

2. June 6 : That all who lay claime to any fellowship, schollar- 
shipp, place of power, trust, or advantage in the Universitie of 
Oxford or any Colledge or Hall therein respectively, doe within 
15 daies repaire to the University to performe their duty and under- 
goe this present Visitation. 

3. July 12: That all who have not appeared upon severall (P- 19 3 -) 
CAMD. SOC. Y 



162 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 14, 1648. former summons should appeare on Fryday next followinge, beinge 
the 14th day, or their names should forthwith be retourned to the 
Committee of Lords and Commons as refusinge to appeare: And 
that notwithstandinge their Orders the persons after named have 
not hitherto appeared before the Visitors since the Order made 
by both the honorable Houses of Parliament, April 21, 1648. 

Concerninge these persons to certifie : 

1. That divers of them have beene absent beyond the sea. 

2. That others have beene absent in the kingdome, some in 
remote places, others in London, and in other places not farr distant. 

3. That others have beene present in the Universitie, since the 
summons, but did not appeare. 

(P. 198 b.) [Names of persons reported to the Committee of Lords and 

Commons.] 
Trinity Colledge. 
Mr. Box. 
S r Douch. 
Mr. French. 
Mr. How 

Mr. Hawes Bursars. 
Mr. Heymor 
Mr. Meese. 



Wadham 
Mr. Attkins. 
Mr. Blanford. 
Mr. Burter. 
S r Baker. 
Mr. Dingley. 

Estrote. 
S r Gifford. 

Mr. Goodridge, long absent. 
S r Skywiffe. 
Mr. Manninge. 



Colledge. 

S r Micharlson. 
Merlaine. 
Mr. Phillips. 
Mr. Strangewayes. 

Hall. 

Jerrnyn. 
Dr. Sugge. 

Sheppard. 
S r Thomas. 

Tucker. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



163 



University e Colledge. 



Mr. Radcliffe 
Mr. Richardson 
Mr. Day 
Mr. Yonge 



Fellowes absent 
many yeares. 
Schollars of the 
House. 



John Stone, Library keeper. 

Pembrooke Colfedge. 
Mr. Whitweeke, the pretended Master. 
Mr. White weeke 
Mr. Darby 
Mr. Carey 
Mr. Whitewicke 
Mr. Daffy 
Ds. Whitweeke 
Ds. Wyatt 
Ds. Brickendine 
Ds. Blisset 

Bew. 

Paine. 

Corpus Christi Colledge. 



Socii : 



Schollers. 



Dr. Hide. 

Mr. Wrench. 

Mr. Sparke, a longe tyme 

sike: 

Mr. Newell. 
Mr. Greaves. 
Mr. Hillersden. 



Mr. Hay wood. 
Mr. Samwayes. 
Mr. Speedinge. 

Holloway, 

Bould. 

Home. 
The Steward. 



July 14, 1648. 
(P. 198 c.) 



Merton Colledge. 

Dr. Turner. Mr. Greaves. 

Crofts: gave the oath of secrecy to those that were in combina- 
tion against the garison. 



(P. 198 e.) 



164 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July i-t, 1618. Harwood, Postmaster Smith. 

Duuvile 



Barkley 



many yeares absent. 



Balioll Colledge, 

Atfeild: Scholler. Coles, Scholar. 

Mr. Trimnell. Mr. Good. 

Mr. Thickins. Mr. Palmer. 

Mr. Bailiffe. Mr. Savage. 

Mr. Crouch. Mr. Spurway. 
S r Clement. 

Oriel Colledge. 

Mr. Home T 

T j t ellowes : 
Loyd 

Bennett - n n 

TT fellow Commoners: 

Hart 

Mr. Albin 
S r Pawley 

Hardinge 

Twittee 

(P-i9Sf.) St. John's Colledge. 

Dr. Wilde 
Mr. Crowder, in France. 

Mr. Warner , 

~ ~, beneficed men. 

Cuffe 

Mr. Stevenson ) in Armes against the 

Swelling j Parliament. 
S r Pulley, married and beneficed. 

Smith, beneficed. 

Harding, in Armes against the Parliament. 

King 



Commoners. 



T ( married. 

Ley \ 

Mr. Heacocke present, but liee never appeared. 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



165 



Magdalen Colledge. 
Mr. Langton. 
Clay. 
Digle. 
Harris. 
Potman. 
Jennyngs. 
Flood. 
Hunt. 
Rogers. 
Dale: sen: 
Langton: jun: 



July 14, 1648. 



Brice. 
Gates. 
Webb. 
Palmer. 
Ds. Janson. 
Toffe. 
Boles. 

Pennyngeton. 
Chamberlin. 
White. 
Osbaldestone. 



Cletherow. 

Mr. Cheeke, Phylosophy Reader. 
Emanuell Heath, in Towne but never appeared. 

Lincolne Colledge. 

Mr. Chalfront, absent beyond S r Marshall, beyond sea. 

the sea 2 yeares. Mr. Robinson, absent 3 yearcs. 

Mr. Gilbert. Mr. Whetstone. 
S r Gibbs. 



(P. 198g.) 



John Busby. 
Geo: Scriven. 
Sam: Speede. 
Edward Beere. 



Christ Church. 

Francis Markham. 

John Baber. 

John Walter: Manciple. 



New Colledge. 



John Bayley. 
Edward Farmer. 
John May lard. 
William Flexney, Barber. 
Jeremy Oakeley: Chap: 



Edward Stanley. 
Hugh Willis: Cap: 
Hen: Nobles or Nobes. 
Symon Coleman, Organist. 
Theodore Gulstone. 



166 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 14, 1648. 
(P. 198 h.) 



(P. 198 i.) 



John Nubury. 
Fran: Bayley. 
Ric: Witt. 
Rich: Pepper. 

Edward Selwood. 
Goodwin Swift. 

Tho: Sutton. 
John Barker. 
John Hill. 
Hen: Price. 



William Cunne: Clerke. 
John Hungerford. 
Tho: Toms. 
Earth: Finch. 

John Bapt: Coll: 

W: Roy. 

Corp: Chr: Coll: 

John Parr. 
Tho: Seymour. 
Tho: Bowden. 
William Harrison. 

Magdalen Colledge. 

William Hearne, cook. 
John Tuchin. 



Rich: Baskett. 
Tho: Fletcher. 
Christ: Taylor. 

Pembrooke Colledge. 

William Collier. Kingsley. 

Tho: Turner. 

Balioll Colledge. 
Tho: Throckmorton. 

Brazen Nose Colledge. 

Edward Heighfeild. John Porter. 

Ralfe Byrom. William Brewer. 

Tho: Church. Jasper Scoles. 

Merton Colledge. 
Benjamynn Cooper. 

Queenes Colledge. 
John Fisher. Tho: Brathwayte. 

Exeter Colledge. 
Barnard Gealard. William Hardinge. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 167 

Aug: 1, 1648. jniy H, 1648. 

Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 
the Universitye of Oxori: 

Ordered : 

That the persons aforesaid who are certified by the Visitors not 
to have submitted to the authoritie of Parliament in the Visitation 
be removed and deprived from their places in their respective Col- 
ledges and Halls and expelled from the Universitye. 

FRAN: Rous: 

[By the Visitors.] 

A Certificate concerninge Dr. Lawrence.* 
Whereas Dr. Lawrence hath engaged himselfe to observe the Dat: July 14 th , 

1 CAQ 

Directory in all ecclesiasticall administrations, to preach practicall 
Divinity to the people, and to forbeare the preachinge of any of 
those opinions which (hee hath formerly preached or printed, and) 
the Reformed Churches have generally condemned: We doe 
hereby testifie, and declare upon his request, for the satisfaction of 
all whom it may concerne, that the learned Doctor aforesaid hath, 
without any salvo or reservation, submitted to the authority of 
Parliament in this present Visitation of the Universitie of Oxon; 
and beinge desirouse to recede from the Universitie, and to betake 
himselfe to some ecclesiasticall employment in the Countrie, wee 
thought fitt to certifie the perticulers above written under our 
hands. 

Ed: Reynolds. Christopher Rogers. 

Jo: Wilkinson. F: Cheynell. 

Hen: Wilkinson. 

* This Order is repeated, with some additions, on Aug. 3 (p. 181). Thomas 
Lawrence, D.D., Master of Balliol and Margaret Professor, is greatly praised by 
Wood for his learning (Ath. Ox. III. 437). He had formerly been Chaplain to 
Charles I. He seems to have resigned his offices, in which he was succeeded by 
Cheynell (May 19, 1648), and Bradshaw (July 21, 1648). At any rate he lived in 
poverty and obscurity till 1657. 



168 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 14, 1648. July 14th, 1648. 

f-p 182 ^ 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, sufficiently authorised by 
an Order of the Lords and Commons, bearinge date Aprill 21, 1648, 

have, with the consent of the Governor of Colledge, in 

Oxon, elected to be Fellow of the Colledge 

aforesaid, and doe hereby require Mr Senior Fellow 

upon the place, forthwith upon sight hereof, to admitt the said 

Mr into a Fellowshipp now voyde in the Colledge 

aforesaid, that hee may actually and presently enjoy all and singuler 
the profitts and priviledges of a Fellow in the said Colledge. And 
wee doe further enjoy ne the Senior Fellow aforesaid to cause this 
our Order to be entred into the Register of the said Colledge. 

(P. 159.) The Names of such Persons as have sent their excuses to the 

July 17, 1648. Visitors for not appearinge to give in their Answeres : 

Mr. Yates, of Brazen-Nose. 
Mr. Blackbourne, of Brazen-Nose. 
Mr. Shepherd, Oriell Colledge. 
Mr. Arris, Bal: Colledge. 
Mr. Quinn, Ch: Ch: 
Geo: Porter, Demy, Mag. Colledge. 

(P. 160.) An Order for setlinge of Fellowes, Schollars, &c. in their 

July 18, 1648. Colledges: a 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, sufficiently authorised by 
an Order of the Lords and Commons, bearinge date Aprill 21, 1648, 
have elected A. B. to be Fellow in Colledge, in 

Oxon, and doe hereby require the Senior Fellow upon the place, 
forthwith upon sight hereof, to admitt the said A.B. to be Fellow 
of the Colledge aforesaid, that hee may actually and presently enjoy 

a This form is substantially a repetition of the previous one of July 14, with the 

omission of the words " with the consent of the Governor of College, in 

Oxon." The Visitors, on second thoughts, determined to act for the present without 
reference to Heads of Houses. 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



169 



all and singular the protitts and priviledges of a Fellow in the said July 18, 1648. 
Colledge. And wee doe further enjoyne the Senior Fellow to cause 
this our Order to be entred into the Register of the said Colledge. 



THE NAMES OF SUCH AS ARE CHOSEN INTO 
COLLEDGES. a 



New Colledge. 

July 18, 1648. Daniell Danvers 

Syddenham 
S r Nest 

Ra: Rymer \ Fell: 
S r Morton 
S r Traite 
Hudson 

Glyd: Child at Winton. b 
Stephens, Sen: 
Johnson. 
Huddy. 
North. 
Risley. 
Huntley. 

Mr. Sprigge, Steward. 
Hann. 

Carter, Butler. 
Ben: Cooper, fell: 



Swynocke, Chapl: 
Hichcocke. 

Jo: Michaell, Child at Winton. b 
Dennis. 
Sharocke. 
Sympson. 
Tho: Leech 
Mich: Wells 
Obed: Wills 
Timothy Banister 
Lane 
Hughes 

Jo: Gunter, Bac: Leg: 
Jones, Bacc: Art: t 
S r Cooke 



Fell: 



S r Kent 
S r Pellarn 
S r Torapson 
Jo: Shefeild 
Winnington 



Fell: 



(P. 184.) 



Jan. 19, 

[1648-9.] 
Jan. 24, 
[1648-9.] 

March 5, 
1648-9. 



June 1, 1649. 



Jnne 5, 1649. 



Jane 6, 
[1649.] 



a This list is so arranged in the Register as to admit of later entries being added 
from time to time. 

b A synonym in ordinary use for " Schokr of Winton." 
CAMD. SOO. Z 



170 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



Fell: 



Chapl. 



June 16, 1649. Jorden 

Stephens 
Frend 
S r Newton 
S r Bromwich 
June 22, 16-49. Mr. Jones, Manciple. 

Mr. Jennings, Under Butler. 
Math: Jellyman, Groorae. 
Mr. Quelch, Porter. 
Lister 
Tickell 
Butler 
Allen 
Noise 
Onsley 

Tim. Hart, Clerke 
Pampion 
Kinge 
Harris 

July 5, 1649. Rich: Huggins, Second Cooke. 
Ed: Warren, Sexton. 
Jo: Blake, Basketbearer. 
Sept. 4, 1649. Mr. Withers, readmitted upon an 
Order from the Committee for 
Eeformation of Oxon. 
Dr. Saltingstone. 
Edmund Baker. 
Dr. Collins. 
Mr. Allen. 
Nath: Humphryes. 
Brooke Bridges. 
Tho: Farefax. 
Mr. Germy. 
Jo: Johnson. 



Fell: 



Chapl: 



Quer: 



Elected April 
2", 1650. 



Stephen Charnocke. 
William Hiccocks. 
Tho: Tanner. 

Steede, Chapl: 
Marke Hildsley, Fell: 
David Raynor, Fell: into Mr. 
Huddys place. 



Elected April 
2* 1 , 1650. 



April 22, 1650. 



Stud: 



Christ Church. 

Rich: Russell 
Edw: Veale 
S r Donbainn 
Tho: Vincent 

Danby 

Yardley 

Temple. 

Scott. 
S r Hancocke. 

Atterbury. 

Ward. 

Bedford, Auditor. 



(P. 185.) 
Sept. 29 th , 
1648. 



Bacher. 
S r Silsby. 

Crompton. 

Willis. 
Antho: Ratcliffe. 

Seagoree. 
Vincent Denn. 



Oct. 10, 
[1648.] 



Ward. 



March 5, 1648. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



173 



March 1, 1649. 


S r Tecle, of New Coll: elected Barksdale Oct. 10, 1648. 




Chap: into Ch: Church, Constantine Adams 




March 1, 1649. Pet: Gillinge 


July 29, 1650. 


Penwarden 
Jackson. p orter 




Philip Babington. Rider \Fe\\: 




An g e11 ' Banger 




Harding. Ward 




Maudit - Rains I March 5, 
Sam: Bourne, Chap: Hickman Jj t 1648 -^ 




Athert.on 


Dec. 24, 1650. 


William George. Ed: Reynolds* July 21, 1648. 




Allrn 






4X*KSU 

Magdalen Colledge. Salloway 




May 25, 1648. 


Mr. Wilkinson Woodriffe 






Josua Crosse \ Appletree 






Stephens 


Gayle 






Farrell 


Palmer 






Sandbrooke 


Crooke 






Kinge 


Jo: Vincent 






Stringer 


Jo: Moore 






Winston 


Bloore 


Demys: 




Cracroft 


Welden 






Sickes 


Fell' Sam: Nicholls, sen: 


(P. 186.) 




Plumbe 


Pinckney 






Holines 


S r Vaughan 






Thackham 








S r Vaughan 


Cruttenden 
Jennings 


Aug. 6, 
[1648.] 


Oct. 10, 1648. 


Wootton 


Jo: Cowley 






Haughton 


Cobb 






Fish 


Soley 






Baron 


Osburne 





* Soon afterwards made Fellow of Magdalen; son of the Vice-Chancellor. He 
was afterwards Archdeacon of Norwich. 



172 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Dec. 1, [1648.] 
Oct. 29, 1648. 



July 1, 1648. 
Oct. 18, 1648. 



Demys: 



Oct. 27, 1648. 



Oct. 18, 
[1648]. 

Sept. 13, 
[1648]. 

July 29, 1649. 



Hen: Parslow 

Will: Hopkins 

S r Nicholls, Demy in 

the place of S r 

Franklin 

S r Hickman, Demy in 
the place of S r 
Porters 

Digby 

Mr. Boult, Cooke. 
Mr. Cooke, Butler. 

Zouch 

Knight 

Barry 

Smithsby 

Osburne 

Garland | 

Kent \ 

Hopkins \ 

Curten ( 

Cowdrey ( 

Hunt 

Powell, Clerke. 

Spilbery 

Kinge 

Attwood 

Hooke 

Almon 

Milner 

Parslow 

Carter, Horskeeper 
David Fogge, 2 d Butler 

Heborne, 2 d Cooke 

Squire, Porter 

Nicholls 



Jennyngs, Fell: 
Edward Reynolds, Fell: 



Aug. 8, 1649. 
Jan. 18, 1649. 



Demys: 



Quer: 



Clerks. 



Quer: 



Sept. 21, 1648. 



Corpus Christi Colledge. 

S r Billingsley i p u . 
Sam: Byfeild J 
Rich: Byfeild, Schol: 
Will: Gardner | ^ ,, 

Burgesse j 
Beniamyn Way, Schol: 

Whitehorne, Fell: Deane 
Ezek: Webb, Schol: 
Will: Ford, Schol: 

Ladiman, Fell: 
Josia Lane, Schol: 
Jo: Lisley, Schol: 
Jo: Sayer, Schol: 
Josia Ballard. 
Nath: Vincent, Quer: 

Nelson, Schol: 
Jo: Prous, Fell: 
Rich: Abbotts, Fell: 
Jo: Dod, Fell: 
Jo: How, Steward. 
Will: Adams, Sen: Cooke. 
Ed: Hawes, Jun: Cooke. 
Nath: Wells, Butler. 

John Langley, Manciple. Oct. 2 d , 1648. 

Jo: Milward, Fell: Vice- President. 

Stephens, Fell: 

Tho: Gilston, Fell: Oct. 26, 1649. 

Elisha Bourne, Fell: Oct. 29, 1649. 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



173 



Oct. 11, 

[1649.] 



Oct. 29 r 1649. flaky, Schol: 

Whettham, Schol: 
Ed: Disney, Schol: 

May 24, 1649. S am: Ashurst. 

Thorneton. 
Tho: Maulthouse. 
Wandricke. 
Anderson. 
Koe, Fell: 
Ford, FeU: 
Sanderson, Fell: 
Raynor, Schol: 
Tidcombe, Fell: 
Wight, Schol: 



Oct. 23 
[1649.] 



(P. 187.) Alsoules Colledge. 

July 18, 1648. Mr. Zanckey 
Rouse 



Oct. 3, 

[1648.] 



Ian. 22, 
;i648-9.J 



Wm: Hamelton 
Tho: Harley 
Tho: Smithsby 

Upton 

Scott 

Siddenham 

Hill 

Geo: Cooke 
Jo: Brockhurst 

Hunt 

Johnson 

Kingo 

Powoil 

Dove i 

Whitlocke j 



Fell: 



Fell: 



Fel: 



S r Harford \ March 8, 

Newton J C 1648 

r\ T> i TUT -i March 29, 

Geo: Beck, Manciple. [1649.] 

Josua Sprigge,preelected June 22, 
1649 
Harris 
Bery 
S r Millington | 



Q uer: 



June 18, 1649. 



S r Pett 

Mr. Barsnett 

Mr. Appletree [Fell:] 

Mr. Boules 

Mr. Lee, Fell: 

See a spetiall Order, pa: 292 
Jo: Osborn, [Fell:] 
Mr. Upton, Fellow, elected Jan: Jan. 14, 1653. 

14, 1653. 

Mr. Vincent, Fell: Jan: 14, 1653. 
Mr. King, Fell: Probation: Aug: 

25, 1654. 



Sept. 18, 1649. 

Jan. 4, 1649. 
Sept. 12, 1650. 



Universitie Colledge. 

Tonge 
S r Woodward ,, 

Wakeley 
S r Gayle 
Hen: Home 

Buresse 

Hulley 

Bee 

Geery 

Mott 

Peard. 

Chamberlaine. 



Oct. 17. 

[1648.] 



Schol: 



174 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Oct. 17, 
[1648.] 

Aprilll2,1649, 



Aprilll2,1649, 



Nov. 6, 
[1649.] 
Nov. 12, 1649. 



Jan. 4, 1649. 
July 31. 

Dec. 5, 1651. 
Sept. 1, 1654. 



March 11, 
1648. 



Fell: 



Schol: 



Braine, Byble Clerke. 

Silvester. 

Burscough 

Ds. Price 

Ds. Buris 

Ds. Jones 

Peter Adams 

Rowland Stedman 

Thomas Cupper 

Nathan Jacob. 
Norton. 

Mr. Hampson. 

Mr. Bennett. 
Brickenden. 

John Kemster. 

Tho: Jennings; his election by 
the Colledge is confirmed by 
the Visitors June 24, 1650. 

Samson Eaton, Fell: 
Terrey, Fell: 

Anth: Fidoe, Fell: 
Basnet, Schol: 

Daniel Gestios, Schol: in Nathan 
Jacob's place. 

Mr. Griffith, Fell: 



Tho: Puller, Fell: 
Babar, Schol: 
Meese, Fellow 
Sutton, Schol: 
Petipher, Fell: 

Mr. Grenell, Fell: 



Brazen-Nose Coll. 



Fell: 



Trinity Colledge. 

Wirge, Fell: 

Weldy, Fell: 
Tho: Moore 1 
Tho: Phillipps } Schol: 
W m Goffe, Fell: 

Smart, Schol: 



Hoyle 

Dan: Greenewood 
Sam: Bruen 

Williamson 

Corkes 

Kirsham 

How, Byble Clerke. 

Eaton, Fell: upon condition 
hee leave his living 
before Easter. 

Higginson. 

Deane. 

Ashton. 

Dupper alias Ducker. 

Sutton. 
Tho: Weston. 

Walker. 

Heskins. 

Purfrey. 

Gilman. 

Rich: Adams. 
S r Gerard ^ 
S' Bursgo j Fell: 

Ridgway, Fell: 



Dec. 12, 1650. 

Sept. 12, 1650 
Dec. 27, 1649 
Dec. 12, 1650. 
Jan. 22, 1650. 



(P. 188.) 
July 18, 
[1648.] 



Oct. 17, 
[1648.] 



Jan. 15, 
[1648-9.] 

Jan. 24, 
[1648-9.] 



May 29, 1649. 
Aug. 8, 1649. 



Nov. 6, 
[1649.] 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



175 



Nov. 6, 
[1649.] 



Fell: 



St. Johns Colledge. 

Gorges 
Brace 
S r Paris 
S r Bachelor 
S r Edwards 
S r Hoult 
Mr. Humberstone. 
Mr Fowler, elected Fell: March 

13 th , 1649. 

Mr. Basnett, Oct. 12, 1650. 
Mr. Gregory Smith, Fell: Aug. 

16, 1654. 
Joseph Taylor, Schol: Jan: 26, 

1656. 



Nath: Till Adams 
Samuel Turner 



Schol: 

July 5, 

1653. a 



Davis, Bradford,Wills, and Chid- An S- 1( >> 1648 - 

ley, Fell: 
Rob: Hancocke. 
Anth: Jett: Cooke. 
S r Maisters, Fell: in the place of 

Mr. Berry removed. 
Sclad, Fellow in the place of Mr. 

Proctor. 
S r Eaton in the place of Mr. 

Polewheele. 



Michaell Dollinge. 



Oriell Colkdge. 

Nath: Burges. 

Wm. Bragge, Treasurer sen: 

S r Gibbons 

Lumacks [Lomax], Treas: jun: 

Easton, Bursar. 

Leafes. 

Weston. 

Longe. 

Dickes. 

Mr. Tho: Upton, of C.C.C. Fell: 
Mr. Way, ofC.C.C. Fell: 
Sam: Carter, Fell: 
Mr. Wolcombe, Fell: 



March 5, 

[1648.] 



(P. 189.) 
Oct. 3 d , 1648. 



Exeter Colledge. 

April 24, 1648. Conant, Fell: b 

Peter Fyatt. 
Fran: Howell, Fellow and Greeke 

Reader. 
Ed: Searle, Fell: and Moderat: in 

the Chappell. 



a It is doubtful, from their place on the Register, whether these two Scholars 
belong to St. John's or Exeter; but probably to the former. 
b Samuel, nephew of Dr. John Conant, Rector in 1649. 



Oct. 27, 

[1648.] 

Oct. 30, 

[1648.] 

Oct. 17, 1653. 
Novemb. 1653, 
Feb. 6, 1653. 
Aug. 23, 1654. 



176 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Aug. 23, 1654. 



Oct. 16. 



Scholl: 



Wadham Colledge. 

Dalender 
Hatley 
Christopher 
Wyatt 
Nicholls 
Jerrard 
Hall 
Baker 
Manninge. 
Tho: Lawrence 

Webber 

Willis 

Bragge, Schol: 

Rathband 

Lee 

Vaughan 

Hodges 

Wright 
Walter Pope 

Boden l 

Graves J 

Atkins, Schol: 



Fell: 



Fell: 



Fell: 



Fell: 



Pembrooke Colledge. 

Aug. 11,1648. S r Lane 

S r Tompkins 
Rob: Steele ) . . 
Potter | Sch l: 
Jo: Hoy, Fell: 
Paul D'Arand. 
Jo: Powell. 
Pet: Jersey. 



Oct. 10. 
[1648.] 



Roswell, Schol: 
Brownesword. 
Fouke, Schol: 
Potter, Fell: 
Robert Parr, Schol: 
John Hall, Schol: 

Hall, Fell: 
Jo: Huntbahr, Schol: 



Lincolne Colledge. 

Jo: Bernard - 

rp , ^ Fell: 
1 aylor J 

Jo: Curtin, Fell: 

Mr. Woods. 

Geo: Hitchcock. 

William Home, Manciple. 



Oct. 16, 
[1648.] 

Jan. 4, 1649. 



Feb. 11, 1649. 
April 22, 1650. 
July 24, 1650. 
Oct. 1, 1656. 



Feb. 11, 1649. 

Feb. 13, 1649. 
Sept. 19, 1650. 

Nov. 25, 
[1650.] 

Feb. 6, 1653. 



Me? ton Colledge. 

Copley, Morall Phylos: Lect: Oct. 3, [1648]. 

Trevor \ 
S r Franke 
S r Dickinson 
S r Wood 
S r Franklin 

Harvey 
Geo: Child 

Bricknell 

Edward Roode, Postmaster, 
John Arnold. 

vid: pa: 190* [for a second list] . 



Oct. 10 th , 1648. 



Postmaisters. Aug. 6, 1649. 



Nov. 12, 1649. 
Feb. 15, 1649. 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



177 



Octob. 27, 
[1648.] 



(P. 190.) Jesus Colledge. 

Oct. 12, [1648.] Owen Price, Schol: 
Eyres. 
Tawke. 
Will: Cockes. 
Browne. 
Forward. 
Lloyd. 
Jonathan Roberts. 

Jones. 
Fran: Wilcocks. 

Brice. 

Sam: Jones, of P.C. 
Timothy Thomas. 
Hen: Bucreet [Du Creetz]. 
Charles Edwards, Schol: 
Nicholas Pypon, into a Jersey 

place. 
April 1, 1652. Samuel Jones. 



Fell: 



Taubators. 



Queenes Colledge. 
Oct. 30, [1648.] s r Fhillipp, New Inn Hall. 

S r Bedford 

S r Barksdall 

S r Foxcroft 

Avery Tompson 

Tho: Collinson . 

James Farrars. L 

Tho: Brathwayt. 

Jan. 17, 1650. William Rawlins, Taubator. 
Nov. 18, 1661. James Rich, Fell: 

CAMD. SOC. 



Balliol College. 

Goade, Fell: 

Freind, Fell: 

Dickins, Exhibit: 
Ferdunces, Exhibit: 

Maynard, Schol: 

Shefeild, Schol: 
Rowland Stedman, Schol: sen: 

Brockett, Schol: 
Sam: Stedman, jun: Schol: 
Jo: Petty, Schol: 

Browne, Schol: 

Oxenbridge. 
Mat: Power -| 

Bennett j ] 

Hoymes ") , 
Lovells } Schol: 
S r Newton | 
S r Swinnock / Fell: 
Wm. Vickins. 

Mr. Holmes, in Poore's place, 
Fell: and Standen Schol: in 
Mr. Holmes' place. 



Nov. 18, 1651. 



Merton College. 
[A second list.] 

Mr. Howell. 
Mr. Nicholls. 
Mr. Abbotts. 
Mr. Powell. 
S r Willowby. 
S r Maund. 
S r Pavier. 
2 A 



Oct. 6, 1649. 



Oct. 22, 1649. 



July 25 th , 1650. 



(P. 190*.) 
Nov. 12 th , 1649. 



178 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



Nov. 18, 1651. gr Hully 

S r Sterry. 
S r Hurst. 
S r Crips. 
Geo: Prickett 
Steph: Richmond 
Wm. Stanes 
Fran: Moore 
Wright 
Wm. Johnson 



(P. 196.) 



Postmasters 
elected Jan: 
17, 1650. 



Leister 
P . 

bam: Beiron 

TV. c i 
Iho: boley 

Wm. Izard 
Mr. Moseley into Mr. Brent's 
place Jan: 22, 1650. 



Postmasters 

elected Jan: 
^ 

17 ' 



Aug: 1, 1648. 

Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 
the Universitie of Oxon. 

Ordered, 

That the souldiery in Oxofi be desired to cause the Orders of 
this Committee to be executed, for removinge of those that are 
expelled the Universitie, five miles from the Universitie. 

Resolved, 

That those places which are voyd may be filled by the Visitors, 
in those Houses where there are not Electors enough submittinge 
to the authority of Parliament. 

Resolved, 

That those persons that were present at the Universitie, since 
the summons, and did not appeare, are under contempt. 

Resolved, 

That those that were in London, and in places not farre distant 
from Oxford, and did not appeare, are under the like contempt. 

Ordered : That those persons not appearinge, be removed, and 
deprived from their places in their respective Colledges, and Halls, 
and expelled from the Universitie. 

FRANCIS Rous. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 179 



Aug: 1, 1648. Aug. l, 1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of (P. 202.) 
the Universitie of Oxford. 

Whereas severall Answeres of Doctor Fell, Deane of Christ Church 
and pretended Vice-Chancellor, Heads of Houses, Doctors, Proctors 
and others of the Universitie of Oxofi, refusinge to submitt to the 
authority of Parliament for visitinge the said University, were- 
referred to this Committee by a speciall Order of both Houses of 
Parliament, to heare and determyne, and to apply effectuall 
remedies as the Cases should require: Upon full hearinge and 
debate of the said Answeres, it was resolved That the matter 
thereof was an high contempt and denyall of authoritie of Parlia- 
ment : and further resolved, that for an effectuall remeady thereof 
the persons guilty of this contempt be removed from their places 
respectively : Now upon hearinge the Report from the Visitors at 
Oxofi touchinge Dr. Henry Stringer, whose Answere is, That as 
hee belongs to New Colledge hee concurrs in Answere with the 
Society of that house, and that hee cannot by the local! Statutes 
submitt to any Visitors that are actually of the Universitie : It is 
now resolved, that the said Doctor Stringer is guilty of high con- 
tempt, and denyall of authority of Parliament: And that for an 
effectuall remeady thereof the said. Doctor Stringer, pretended 
Warden of New Colledge in Oxofi, be removed from the said Col- 
ledge, and is hereby required to quitt the said place, and all 
emoluments, rights, and appurtenances thereto belonginge : And hee 
who supplyes the Vice Warden or Senior Fellowe's place in the said 
Colledge is hereby required to publish this Order to the whole 
Society, and such others as may be concerned therein. 

FRANCIS Rons. 



180 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Aug. 2, 1648. Aug. 2, 1648. 

(P. 197.) Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxon : 

Ordered : a 

1. That those who are of kin to the Founder of New College 
shalbe preferred first to the places voyd in that Colledge, they sub- 
mittinge to the authority of Parliament. 

2. That schollars of Winchester Colledge shall next be admitted, 
they submittinge to the authority of Parliament. 

3. That those that are superanuated schollars of Winchester 
shalbe admitted in the next place, they submittinge to the authority 
of Parliament. FRANCIS Rous. 

Aug: 4, 1648. 
At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxford. 
Ordered : 

That it be referred to the Visitors to put in execution the power 
which they have for the removinge scandalouse persons from their 
places in the Universitie of Oxford. FRANCIS Rous. 

Aug. 4, 1648. Aug: 4, 1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for reformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon. 

Mr. Button Whereas it appeareth to this Committee and was accordingely 

Prebend: of resolved, That Dr. Henry Hamond, b one of the Prebendaries of 

Christ Church, At .\ '.fi r, 

and Universitie Christ Church in Oxon, was guilty of high contempt and denyall of 

Orator. authoritie of Parliament : And for an effectual remeady thereof, it 

was also resolved, That the said Dr. Hamond be removed from 
beinge Prebendary of Christ- Church, and Orator of the Universitie, 
and that Dr. Edward Corbitt be a Collegiate Prebendary of Christ- 

a The proper order was that, in default of (1) and (2), those might be elected who 
had formerly been one year at Winchester College. 
b For Hammond, see Introduction 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 181 

Church and Orator of the Universitie in the place of the said Dr. Au S- 4 > 1648 - 
Hamond : This Committee being informed by the Visitors at Oxori 
that the said Dr. Corbitt hath relinquished the said places, doe now 
order, That Mr. Ralph Button be and hereby hee is constituted 
and established a Collegiate Prebend, of Christ Church and Univer- 
sitie Orator, and shall enjoy and have all the power, rights, emolu- 
ments, roomes, and lodgings, by any Statute, custom, or right 
formerly belonginge to the said Dr. Hamond : and the Fellows and 
Scholars, and others of or belonginge to Christ Church are to take 
notice hereof: and this Order is to be entered in the Register of 
Christ Church. FRANCIS Rons. 

[By the Visitors.] (P. 191.) 

L J J Aug. 3, 1648. 

A Certificate concerninge Dr. Lawrence. 

Whereas Dr. Tho: Lawrence hath engaged himselfe to observe 
the Directory in all Ecclesiastical adminstrations, to preach practicall 
divinity to the people, and to forbeare the preachinge of any of 
those opinions which the Reformed Churches have condemned: 
Wee doe hereby testifie and declare, for the satisfaction of all 
whom it may concerne, That the learned Doctor aforesaid, hath, 
without any salvo or reservation, submitted to the authority of 
Parliament in this present Visitation of the Universitie of Oxford. 

And because the Dr. is desirouse to recede from this Universitie, 
and to betake himselfe to such ecclesiasticall imployment abroad, 
as shall be thought fitt by such as are in authority, for a man of his 
parts and learninge, wee have certified the perticulers above written 
under our hands. 

Ordered by the Visitors : That the Butler of Oriell Colledge be Aug. 3, 1648. 
required to bringe the Buttery Booke of the Colledge to Mr. Vice 
Chancellor, who is hereby desired, and authorised, to enter into 
the said Booke the name of Mr. William Bragge, lately chosen 
Fellow into the said Colledge by the Visitors, accordinge to an 
Order of both houses of Parliament bearinge date Aprill 21, 1648. 



182 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Aug. 3, 1648. Eesolved by the Visitors : That all officers of Colledges and Halls 

(P. 195 ) . ... 

in Oxford, who have not submitted to this present Visitation, shalbe 
deprived of their places and offices, and noe longer execute the 
same. And the Heads and Fellowes in the said Colledges and 
Halls are required to take notice hereof; and to cause the same to 
be observed accordingely. 

Aug. 10, 1648. Aug: 10 th , 1648. 

Whereas divers of the senior Fellows of St. Johns Colledge in 
Oxon have not submitted to (and are therefore expelled by) the 
authoritye of Parliament: Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie, 
sufficiently authorised to regulate the Universitie, and all the Col- 
ledges and Halls therein, consideringe that the Colledge aforesaid 
is to be governed by the President and tenne seniors of the said 
Colledge or the major part of the seniors aforesaid, doe hereby 
appoynt Mr. Webb, Mr. Inkersell, Mr. Lownes, Mr. Needier, Mr. 
Wells, senior, Mr. Gorges, Mr. Wells, junior, Mr. Brace, S r Basnett, 
and S r Gunter, or any seaven of them, to take care of all the 
affaires of St: Jo: Baptist Colledge, in the absence of Mr. Cheynell, 
President of the said Colledge: and doe hereby authorise them to 
punish such as are irregular, accordinge to the wholsome Statutes 
and lawdable decrees of the Colledge aforesaid. 

Aug. 10 th . 1. French and Boxe of Trinity Colledge were this day expelled 

that House and the Universitie, for their contempt of the authentic 
of Parliament. 

2, Chudley, Davis, Bradford, and Wells, were this day elected 
into Exeter Colledge. 

Josua Crosse, Procter, was this day chosen one of the 13 Seniors 
in Magdalen Colledge in Oxon. 

Aug. 11,1648. Voted this day: That Peter Fiatt shall not be Senior to the 
(P. 195.) Masters of Art that were since chosen into Exeter Colledge. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 183 

Sept. 13, 1648. Sept. 13,1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation (P. 200.) 
of the Uhiversitie of Oxford. 

Whereas it was formerly ordered by this Committee that Mr. 
Henry Cornish be a Collegiate Prebend of Christ Church in Oxon 
in the place of Doctor John Wall, late Prebend thereof, and re- 
moved for his high contempt and denyall of authoritie of Parlia- 
ment: And whereas upon the submission of the Dr. Wall to this 
Committee it was resolved : That the said Doctor Wall be a Col- 
legiate Prebend of Christ Church in the place of Doctor Sanderson, 
who was likewise removed by this Committee for his high con- 
tempt, and denyall of authoritie of Parliament, as by the said 
Order bearinge date lAugusti more fully appeares : Now upon the 
humble desire of the said Doctor Wall to this Committee, that hee 
may be restored to the place which hee formerly had before the 
Visitation of the Universitie, it is resolved and ordered that the 
former Orders of this Committee for establishing Mr. Cornish in 
the place of Doctor Wall, and the establishinge Dr. Wall in the 
place of Dr. Sanderson, be revoked : And that the said Doctor John 
Wall be restored to, and is hereby established a Collegiate Prebend 
of Christ Church, in the place which he formerly enjoyed: And 
shall hold and possesse all rights, emoluments, profitts, roomes, and 
lodgings thereto belonginge: And that Mr. Henry Cornish doe 
hold and enjoy the rights, emoluments, profitts, roomes, and lodg- 
ings of Dr. Sanderson in lew thereof: And the officers whom it 
may concerne are to take notice hereof. FRAN : Rons. 

Sept. 14, 1648: (P. 199.) 

Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation 
of the Universitie of Oxon : 

Whereas severall Answeres of Dr. Fell, Deane of Christ Church 
and pretended Vice Chancellor, Heads of Houses, Doctors and 
others of the Universitie of Oxon, refusinge. to Submitt to the 



184 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. 14, 1648. authoritie of Parliament for Visitation of the said Universitie, were 
referred to this Committee by a spetiall Order of both Houses of 
Parliament to heare and determine, and to apply effectuall rcmea- 
dies as the cases should require: Uppon full hearinge and - ; 3bate 
thereof it was resolved: That the matter of the said Answers was 
an high contempt, and denyall of authoritie of Parliament. And 
further resolved, That for an effectuall remeady thereof the persons 
guilty of this contempt be removed from their places : Upon hear- 
inge a Report of the Visitors touchinge Dr. Henry Stringer, who 
beinge asked by them whether hee submitts to the authority of 
Parliament, reply es: (1) That as he belongs to New Colledge hee 
concurres in Answere with the Society of that house : That hee 
cannot by their locall Statutes submitt to any Visitors that are 
actually of the Universitie : (2) That as hee hath a capacity in the 
Universitie hee hath labored to in forme himselfe concerninge the 
Question proposed, but by reason of some doubtfull termes in the 
Question cannot yet satisfie his conscience what to answere: and 
therefore hee humbly desires a little longer respite, which Answere 
hath beene adjudged by this Committee for an high contempt and 
denyall of authority of Parliament : It is ordered by this Committee, 
That the said Dr. Henry Stringer be removed from the place of 
Greeke Lecturer in the Universitie of Oxofi : And accordingely the 
said Dr. is required to yeild obedience. 

FRANCIS Rons: 

Sept: 14: J648: 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation 

(5f the Universitie of Oxon : 
Ordered, 

(P. 206.) That the Heads of Houses and Prebendaries of Christ Church, 
displaced by authoritie of Parliament, doe remove from the Uni- 
versitie and precincts thereof within foureteen daies after notice 
hereof: And the Visitors are to make knowne this Order to them 
accordingely. FRANCIS Rous: 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 185 

Sept: 14: 1648. Sept. 14, 1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Keformation (P- 206.) 

of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Ordered : That the Heades of Houses and Prebendaries of Christ 
Church displaced by authoritie of Parliament doe remove from the 
Universitie and precincts thereof within fourteene dayes after notice 
hereof, and the Visitors are to make knowne this Order to them 
accordingly. FRANCIS Rons. 

Sept: 14: 1648. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon. 

Whereas severall answeres of Dr. Fell, Deane of Christ Church 
and pretended Vice-Chancellor, Heades of Houses, Doctors, Proc- 
tors, and others of the Universitie of Oxon refuseing to submitt to 
the authoritie of Parliament for Visiting the said Universitie, were 
referred to this Committee by spetiall Order of both Houses of 
Parliament to hear and determine, and to apply effectuall remedies 
as the cases should require: Upon full hearinge and debate ( p - 207 -) 
thereof, It was Resolved and ordered that Mr. Robert Waringe, 
Senior Proctor of the said Universitie, beinge adjudged guilty of 
high contempt and denyall of authority of Parliament, should be 
removed from his Proctor's place in the said Universitie of Oxford : 
and deliver up the bookes, and other things belonginge to his 
office, to the Visitors, to be kept by them till further Order, as 
by the said Order bearinge date 20 Jan: 1647, may appeare: Now 
upon hearinge the Report from the Visitors that the said Mr. Robert 
Waringe doth possesse the place of History Reader in Oxford, And 
hath not submitted to the authority of Parliament, nor delivered 
upp the Insignia of his office of Proctor accordinge to the said 
former Order of this Committee, and beinge chosen into the said 
place of History Reader when the Universitie was under Visitation, 

CAMD. SOC. 2 B 



186 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. u, 1648. and contrary to the Articles of the Surrender of Oxford, as by a 
Letter from his Excellency the Lord Generall Fairefax is declared: 
It is Ordered by this Committee that the said Mr, Waringe, pre- 
tended History Header of the Universitie of Oxford, be removed 
from the said place : And hereof the said Mr. Waringe is required 
to take notice, and to yeiid obedience accordinge. 

(P. 209.) Septemb: 14: 1648. 

Dr. Du Molyn At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Keformation of 
History TT . . . ^ 

Header of the the Universitie of Oxon: 

"University 

admitted by Whereas it appeared to this Committee That Mr. Robert 
OrtTS^Sh Waringe, the pretended History Reader of the Universitie of Oxford, 
1648. hath not submitted to the authority of Parliament in the Visitation, 

nor delivered upp the Insignia of his office according to a former 
order of this Committee, being thereunto required when he was 
Proctor of the said Universitie, and being chosen into the said place 
of History Reader by Doctor Fell, pretended Vice- Chancellor and 
Heades of Houses when the Universitie was under Visitation, and 
contrary to the Articles of the Surrender of Oxon as by a Letter 
from the Generall is declared : And whereas it was this day resolved 
by this Committee that for an effectuall remedy hereof the said 
Mr. Robt: "Waring, the pretended History Reader, be removed from 
the said place, and that Dr. Lewis Du Molyn, a recommended upon 
good testimony for a person of piety and learning, be History 
(P. 210.) Reader: It is Ordered by this Committee that the sayd Doctor 
Lewis Du Molyn be, and hereby he is constituted and established, 
History Reader of the said Universitie of Oxon in the place of the 
said Mr. Robert Waring, pretended Historic Reader, and shall enjoy 
and have all profitts, priviledges, advantages and benefitts by any 
Statute, custome, or right, belonging to the said place. 

FRAN: Rons. 

a Lewis Du Moulin, M.D. son of the more celebrated Peter Du Moulin, a volu- 
minous author, and, according to Wood, " a fiery, violent, and hot-headed Inde- 
pendent." Fasti, ii. 128. He died 1680. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 187 

September 14: 1648. Sept. 14, 1648. 

/p 217 ^ 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Keformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon : 

Whereas this Committee formerly ordered that Mr. Kobert Crosse Dr. Hpyle, 
of Lincolne Colledge be .Regius Professor of Divinity of the Uni- p ro ff^r. 
versitie of Oxon, in the place of Doctor Sanderson removed by 
Order of this Committee for his high contempt and denyall of 
authoritie of Parliament; a letter of the said Mr. Crosse beinge 
produced and read before this Committee, wherein hee desires that 
the said place may be conferred upon another : It is thought fitt 
and ordered by this Committee that Dr. Josua Hoyle, Maister of 
Universitie Colledge, bee, and hereby hee is appoynted, Regius 
Professor of Divinity of the said Universitie of Oxon, and shall 
take and receave all profitts, priviledges, and benefitts thereof to 
his owne use as they shall grow due to him for the performance of 
the said place, provided that the place of Prebendary of Christ 
Church lately belonginge to the said Dr. Sanderson, wherein Mr. 
Henry Cornish is established by order of this Committee be pos- 
sest and enjoy'd still by the said Mr. Henry Cornish to all intents 
and purposes, with all the rights, profitts, and priviledges there- 
unto belonginge and dependinge.* 

FRANCIS Rous. 

Sept. 30 [20], 1648. (p. 204.) 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Sept. 20, 1648. 
Universitie of Oxon: 

Whereas it is Ordered by this Committee that the Heads of 
Houses and Prebendaries of Christ Church displaced by authoritie 
of Parliament doe remove from the Universitie and Precincts 
thereof within Foureteene daies after notice thereof: It is thought 
fitt by this Committee that Dr. Shelden doe offer to the Visitors 

For Hoyle, see Introduction. For Crosse, see p. 3. 

* 



188 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. 20, 1648. \vhere hee desires to reside, And the Visitors are to certifie the 
same to this Committee with all convenient speede. a 

FRANCIS Ecus. 

(P. 205.) At a meetinge of the Visitors this 20th of Sept: 1648. 

It is this day Ordered: That William Jones and Clement Halsey, 
formerly Almesmen b of Christ Church, upon their petition and 
certificate of their good affection to the Parliament, be restored to 
their former places and rights by the Deane and Prebendaries of 
the said House. 

( p. 201.) Sept, 25, 1648. 

Sept. 25, 1648. This day the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon constituted and 
confirmed George Bradshaw, Master of Arts, and Fellow of Balioll 
Colledge, in the said Universitie, Head or Master of the said Col- 
ledge, accordinge to an Order of the Committee of Lords and 
Commons, bearinge date 21 July. 1648. 

Sept. 25, 1648. Also this day Mr. Nathaniell Carter was chosen Butler of New 
Colledge, accordinge to the desire and recommendation of the 
Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Uni- 
versitie of Oxon: 

a For the proper date of this Order see p. 190. The comparatively courteous 
nature of the communications held with the uncompromising Sheldon must he 
supposed due to the skill he had evinced in his dealings with the Visitors, as well 
as to the place he had taken as acknowledged leader of his party, and his popu- 
larity with them. In the Wood MSS. F. 35, there is abundant evidence of the 
deference paid to Sheldon by the University, as might be expected from his well- 
tried independence of character, dexterity, and dignified manners. See also below; 
and Worthies of A.S. p. 196 (where, however, " houses " should read " horses "). 

b The Christchurch Almshouse has very lately been dissolved. The buildings 
are at present appropriated to the residence of the treasurer of Christchurch. 

8 The delay which had occurred in settling the new Master may be accounted for 
by the notices of the old one (pp. 169, 181). We have no information as to the 
motives of Dr. Lawrence in resigning and submitting; but the second certificate 
may have had some effect in creating the actual vacancy. There was still a diffi- 
culty somewhere ; for it was not till Oct. 20 that the Order for Bradshaw's Ad- 
mission was given. In that Order his appointment is said to have been made by an 
" Ordinance of Parliament;" it is not registered. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 189 

Present of the Visitors : Sept. 25, 1648. 

Sir Nathaniell Brent. Mr. Mills. 
Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Cheynell. 

Dr. Kogers. 

[A Copy of an Order of 1645 by the House of Commons.] (P. 208.) 

8 Januarij, 1645. 

At the Committee of the House of Commons for Examinations. 

It is this day Ordered : That Mr. John Kinge of Aldbury in the A Copy of an 
County of Surrey, who this day appeared before the Committee, 
and shewed sufficient Certificate of his takingethe Nationall Covenant, 
be discharged from any further attendance : and that the restraints 
upon his rents be taken off, and he be permitted to receave the 
same without further trouble as formerly. MYJLES CORBETT. 

Sept. 25: 1648. (P. 200.) 

This day the Visitors restored Dr. John Wall a and establish't him 
a Collegiate Prebend of Christ Church in the place which he 
formerly enjoy 'd accordinge to the Order imediately folio winge 
[Sept. 13: See p. 183]: and desired Sir Nathaniell Brent and 
Mr. Mylles to enter his name in the Buttery Booke, and to see the 
said Order effectually executed. 

At a meetinge of the Visitors. 
Sept. 25, 1648. 

Ordered : That all the allowances and dues of the persons under- 
named, not havinge appeared, or submitted to the authority of 
Parliament in the Visitation, be suspended, and detayned from them 
untill further Order: And the Master, Bursers t and other Officers 
of the said Colledge are required to take notice hereof, and to forbeare 
the payment of such allowances or dues to them accordingely. 

a Dr. John Wall, Canon of Ch. Ch. 1632, "a qnaint preacher and severe student "; 
a benefactor of the City of Oxford. (Ath. Ox. iii. 734.) His portrait is accordingly 
in the Council Chamber of the City. 



190 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. 25. 1643. Mr. Hen: Whightwicke * j Felloweg of p embrooke 

Mr. William Darby College. 

Mr. Tho: Gary 
Mr. Tho: Whightwicke, Jim: 

Mr. Hen: Wyatt: Ba: Art: , ,, c ^ , , 

,, _, -r . i T Scholl: of Pembrooke 

Mr. .bran: rJnckendme ~ , 

Mr. Rich: Dew C lled S e ' 

Mr. Robert Payne 

(p 205 x At a meetinge of the Visitors this 28th of Sept. 1648. 

It is this day Ordered: That Dr. Reynolds Vice Chancellor of 
this Universitie of Oxon have full power and authority from the 
Visitors aforesaid to enter the name of Nath: Burges into the 
Buttery Booke of Oriell Colledge, by spetiall Order: And to this 
end the Butler of the Colledge aforesaid is to waite upon the Vice 
Chancellor in the execution hereof with his Buttery booke: 

[Certificate concerning Dr. Sheldon.] 
Sir, 

Sept. 28, 1648. Whereas wee receaved an Order from the honorable Com- 

(P. 204.) mittee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie 

of Oxon bearinge date Sept: 20th 1648, concerninge Dr. Sheldon, 

that he should offer to us where he desires to reside : Wee hereby 

certifie, That Dr. Sheldon has been acquainted with that Order, 

and thereupon hath signified his humble desire contayned in this 

inclosed paper under his hand, which wee humbly leave to the 

consideration of the honorable Committee : to whom wee pray you 

to present the same: Soe wee remayne, 

Sir, 

Your humble Servants, 
Ed: Reynolds. Nath: Brent. 

Jo: Wilkinson. Christ: Rogers. 

Jo: Mylles. Hen: Wilkinson. 

Fran: Cheynell. 

" See page 6. 



THE VISITOR'S REGISTER. 191 

At a meetinge of the Visitors the 29th of Sept: 1648. Sept. 28, 1648. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie sufficiently authorised ty 
authority of Parliament have given (to John Martine Fellow of 
Exeter Colledge) full power and authority to receave the Kerits 
due and belonginge to fixeter Colledge aforesaid. 

Sept. 29, 1648. 

Resolved: That Dr. Sugg of Wadhatn Colledge be removed from Se P*- 29 > 1648 - 
the said Colledge for his contempt of a speciall Order for his 
personall appearance before the Visitors. 

Resolved: That Wm. Harding, Cook of Exeter Colledge, be re- I 
moved from his said place for his misdemeanor and contempt of 
authoritie of Parliament: And further resolved that Anthony Jett, 
for his great sufferings and good affection to the Parliament, doe 
execute the said Cooke's place in the Colledg aforesaid. 

Memorand: That upon some proposals by the Delegates con- C^- 206 
cerning the Steward's place of New Colledg it was taken into con- 
sideration and concluded that an Order made by the Committee 
of Lords and Commons concerning the recomendation of Mr. Sprigg 
to be Steward of the aforesaid Colledge, that his case and business 
should be reported to the said Honorable Committee with the next 
Reports from the Visitors. 

Memorand: That the Inhibition made Aprill the 15th, 1648, 
for the publique use of Common Prayer, be put in present execution 
in Christ Church Colledge and Jesus Colledge in more perticuler: a 

Memorand: That one Wm. Adams for his good desert be re- 
membred for the next Colledge Cooke's place in the gift of the 
Visitors. 

Oct. 2, 1648. 

Whereas wee understand that the Vicaridge of Home Church in Oet 2 1648. 
the County of Essex is now voyd by the death of the Vicar of the An Answ. to 
said Parish, and that the guift thereof is in the Warden and Mr. Corbitt's 
Fellowes of New Colledge in Oxon: In respect of the present and ^p 2 07.) 

a See Introduction. 



192 THE VISITORS' REGISTEE. 

great unsettlement of the said Colledge, wee the Visitors of the 
Universitie of Oxon, upon certificate of the honesty and abilities of 
one Mr. Whittacre a the younger, doe, as farre as in us lyes, 

appoynt him 'to officiate in the said Vicarage: In testimony 
whereof wee have hereunto subscribed our names: 

Ed Reynolds. Nath: Brent. 

Jo: Wilkinson. Chr: Rogers. 

Jo: Milles. Hen: Wilkinson. 

Fr: Cheynell. 

(P. 208.) Resolved: That all Elections since July 2 d , 1646, accordinge to an 
Oct. 2, 1648. Order of the Committee of Lords and Commons, be voyd, and of 
none effect. 

Ordered: That Mr. Henry Whightwicke of Pembrooke Colledge, 
procuringe his Submission (to the authoritie of Parliament in this 
present Visitation), attested by good and sufficient wittnesses in the 
countrie where he now lives, Ordered to be accepted of and 
approved. 

Ordered: That Colonell Pindersson of Christ Church, upon his 
personall submission to the Visitors, be confirmed Student of Christ 
Church. 

Mr. Forman Ordered : That it be reported to the Committee of Lords and 
Chibnall Commons that it is the sense of the Visitors that Mr. Forman of 

Magdalen Colledge have the liberty to stay two monthes at Ifley, 
neere Oxford. 

Ordered : That Mr. Chibnall be enlarged, puttinge in good security 
for his appearance. 

Oct. the 2 nd , Wee the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe upon good 

1648- and sufficient groundes remove and displace Mr. John Holloway 

from being Steward of New Colledge : and in his roome and stead 

doe hereby constitute and appoynt Mr. Wm. Sprigg to officiate 

and execute the place of Steward in the said Colledge : and that 

a Whittacre was not a Member of New College. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



193 



he enjoy all and singuler the rights, profitts and priviledges of the Oct. 2, 1648. 
said place, and to this end and purpose doe enjoyne the members 
of the said Colledge to take notice hereof, and to settle him in the 
said place, as alsoe to cause this our Order to be entered into the 
Register of the said Colledge. 

Ordered, That Mr. John Kinge, Auditor of Christ Church, be (P. 209.) 
removed for his contempt: And that according to the Order of the Oct 3 
Committee of Lords and Commons for Oxon, Mr. Samuell Bedford 
execute the said place, and enjoy all the benefitts of and belonginge 
thereunto. 



Non-submission. 



PERSONS REMOVED FROM THEIR PLACES : a 
Corp: Christ: Coll: 

Mr. Newlyn, Steward, for Non-appearance. 

Jo: Hill, Senior Cooke 

Jo: Parnes, Butler 

Tho: Seamer, Manciple 

Hen: Price, Junior Cooke 

Tho: Bowden, Porter 

Mr. Wrench, Fell: 

Mr. Speedinge, Fell : 

Mr. Thos: Sutton, Fell: 

Mr. Barker, Fell: 
Bolde 
Warr 
Fountaine 

Mr. Samwaies, Fell: 

Mr. Haywood, Fell: 

S r . Lydall, Sch: 

S r . Eales, Chaplin: 

a Wood ascribes the delay which had occurred in the expulsion of the following 
persons, partly to the circumstance that the Visitors were getting in their tithes, 
and partly, with more probability, to the insurrection of the Royalists in England, 
Scotland, and Wales, sometimes called the Second Civil War. He describes a plot 
laid in Oxford itself in July by certain scholars, privileged persons, and citizens, 
for the relief of Colchester; its discovery and consequences. (Annals.) 
CAMD. SOC. 2 C 



Scho: Elections null. 



Johnson; Home; 
Tonstall ; Lawrence ; 
Holloway 



Sch: 
Elec: 
null. 



Upon the Order of the 
Committee of Lords and 

Commons, 
Oct: the llth. 



(P. 162.) 
Oct. 2, 1648. 



Oct. the 3 d . 



194 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Oct. 3, 1648. 



Alsoules Coll. 
Oct. 2. 



Mr. Hen. Button, Fell: 
Coldharn, Sch. 

Mr. Berkenhead : from his Fellowshipp, and 

Moral Phyl: Lect: a 
Mr. Baldwyn, from Fell:" 



Mr. Tho: Darell, Fell: 
Mr. Tho: Smith, Fell: 



Non-submitters. 



Mr. Nappyer, Fell: 

Mr. Newman, Fell: 

Mr. Gorge, Fel: 

Mr. Crofte, Fel: 

Mr. James, Fel: 

Hollingsworth, Butl: Manciple. 



Mr. Hungerford 

Mr. Talbott 

Mr. Dorrell 

Dr. Bassett d 
Norton 
Culpaper 



Upon the Order of Lords 
and Commons: 



June 18, 1649. Mr. Harrington. 

Mr. Bagley. 

See: pa: 150: 156: 212: 118. 

a Sir John Birkenhead for he was knighted at the Restoration was a man of 
some mark. His ephemeral writings had largely served the Royal cause in the war ; 
and " the Loyal Poet " of Charles II.'s reign was not only an active pamphleteer 
but an important Member of Parliament and champion of the Church. (See W. of 
All Souls, p. 200, Grey's Debates, and the Parliamentary History.) 

b Baldwin "kept his place afterwards by application to Kelsey, Deputy-Governor " 
(Annals), or rather, according to Ath. Ox. iv. 334, Kelsey's wife. 

c See W. of All Souls, and Monument in cloisters of All Souls. 

d See Life of Dr. Mansell, by Sir L. Jenkins, p. 29. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



195 



/"p -I /o \ 

Mr. Hollywell, Steward : Non-appearance: vid: pa: 151: 156. New Coll. 

Oct. 2, 1648. 

Mr. Maylard 
Mr. Gulston 



Mr. Tichburne 

Mr. Blincow 

Mr. Newberry 

Mr. Barton 

Mr. Crake 

Mr. Trimnell 

Mr. Rives, sen: in Armes 

Mr. Woolley 

Mr. Fowkes 

Mr. Jones 

Mr. Heigham 

Mr. Hungarford 



New College. 
May 26 Jnly 



5, 1649. 



Outed upon the Order of 
Committee: May 26 : and 
June 1: and June 16: 
1649: 



Fel: 



Chapl: 



Beaw 

Stanley, Jun. 

Warrener 

Read 

Okeley 

Coleman, Organist 

Clunn, Sexton 

Knollis, Clerke 

Pepper, Underbutler 

Leech, Manciple 

Smith, Porter 

Shaw, Groome 

Finch, Under Cooke 
in New Coll: re- 
moved: and Tombs, 
Basket bearer 



June 22: 1649. 



July 5th, 1649. 



196 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Christ Chnrch. 
Oct. 2, [1648]. 

" Oct. 13. 



July 29th, 
1650. 



Wadham Coll. 
Oct. 2, [1648]. 



Sept. 29. 



Upon the Order of the 

Committee of Lords 

and Commons. 



Mr. Kinge, Auditor : Non- 
appearance 

Dr. Mayne, Student 

Mr. Llewellen, Student 

Mr. Weaver, Chaplin 

Mr. Byon 

Mr. Underwood 

S r Love 
Nicholas 
Blaze Carell 

James Heath 

Adam Littleton 

Mr. Norgate 

Henry Gregory 

Francis Dixon > 

Mr. Canopias, Chaplin. a 

Mr. Bennell: upon scandall, and Nonsubmission. 

Mr. Bennett: removed Dec: 24: 1640 [? 1649], for Non- 
appearance. See pag: 150: 156: 

Seaverne 
Heylin 



Bennell 

Busby 

Bartley 

Washbourne 

Markham 

Mr. Atkins, Fellow 
Mr. Strangeway, Fellow 
S r Michaelson, Schol. 
S r Huish, Schol. 
D r Sugge, Fellow. 



Upon the Order of the 
Committee. 



Upon the Order of the 

Committee of Lords 

and Commons. 



n Canopias, or Conopius, became Bishop of Smyrna, circa 1650. (Annals.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



197 



Tho: Carey: for his Non-appearance and his enjoyment a Pemb. Coll. 
benefice contrary to the Statute of that Colledge. 

Mr. Darby: for his contempt. 

Mr. Hen: Whitwick, Sen : for his high contempt. 



Mr. Langton, Sen. 
Mr. Clay 
Mr. Digley 
Mr. Harris 
Mr. Lloyd 
Mr. Rogers 
Mr. Dale, Sen. 
Mr. Clitheroe. 
Mr. Wake, Fellow. 

Mr. Langton 
Christ: Taylor, 2 nd Butler 
Jo: Touchin, 3 d Butler 
Wm. Hern, 2 nd Cooke 
Emanuell Heath, Horse- 
keeper 

Mr. Oates \ 
Mr. Palmer 
Mr. Webb 

Boules 

Pennington 
S' Bayley ) 
Mr. Chibnall, Fellow. 



Mag. Coll. 
Oct. 10. 



Fellowes ejected upon an 
Order of the Committee 
of Lords and Commons. 



Oct. 16. 



Oct. 20th. 



Vid: pa: 118: 
Lodoweeke Mason: Upon the Order of the Lords and pa: 153. 

Commons. 

Mr. Cox: removed Aprill 5th. 
Jennings | July 29th, 
Bassett 1 1649. 



198 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



(P. 165.) 

Oriell Coll. 



Oct. 30th. 



Exeter Coll. 
Oct. 11. 



(P. 166.) 
Jesus Coll. 

Jan. 15, 1648. 



St. John's 
Coll. 



Oct. 16th, 
1648. 



Balioll Coll. 
Oct. 20. 



Mr. Chambers 
Mr. Boucli 
Mr. Sanders 
Mr. Sheldon 



Fellows. 



Upon the Order of the 

Committee of Lords 

and Commons. 



Mr. Home, Fellow 
Mr. Lloyd, Fellow 

Mr. Berry, Fellow 

Mr. Proctor, Fellow 

Mr. Polewheele 

Mr. Willett. 

Mr. Hardinge, Cooke: removed. 



Upon the Order of the 

Committee of Lords 

and Commons. 



Upon the Order of the 
Committee of the Lords 
and Commons. 



Hen: Pue: Schol. upon certeficate of 3 yeares absence from 

the Colledge, and his enjoying a liveing in the Country. 
Mr. Brevin: a Outed upon the Order of the 16: No: last. 

Dr. Wild 
Dr. Edwards 
Mr. Milward 
Mr. John Jennings 
Mr. Robert Jennings 
Mr. Arthur Puckrige 
Mr. Mawes 
Mr. Aston 
Mr. Crowcher. 
Mr. Gisby. 
Mr. Goad. 
Mr. Creede. 
Mr. Osbaston. 
Mr. Walwyn. 

Thickins, Fell: 

* This is the famous divine, Dr. Daniel Brevint, Jersey Fellow; afterwards 
Dean of Lincoln. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



199 



Mr King, Fell: 
Mr. Byrome, Fell: 
Mr. Roberts, Fell: 
Mr. Church, Fell: 
S r Porter, Bible Cler: 
Jo Newton, Fell: 
Rich: Hill, Fell: 

Mr. Ratcliff 
Mr. Woodhead 
Mr. Day, Sch. 
Stone, Bible Cler: 

Young 
Goldwell 

Hanson 
Dale 



(P. 167.) 
Brazen Nose 
Coll: 
Oct:17,[1648.] 



Upon the Order of the Com- 
mittee of Lordes and Commons. 



Fellows. 



Sch: Non-appearance. 



Non-appearance. 



Aug: 8: 1649: 



Universitie 
Coll. 

Oct. 17. 



Oct. 17, 1648. 



Mr. Purway, Fellow: Non-submission, and marriage: Oct: 26. Balio 

Tn (P. 168.) 

Lvans \ 

Atfeild 

Okeley 



Sch: Non-appearance. 



Mr. Poore : removed July 25th, 1650, upon severall Articles 
of misdemeanors proved upon oath. 

Mr. How 

Mr. Walker 



Non-appearance Oct: 26. 

] Nov. 2: 
Peirson, Fellow: Non- Submission. 

Taubators. [Taberdars] 



Trinitie Coll: 



Jo: Pate: Schollar. 
Mees: Schollar 



Gregg 
Fletcher 



Nov. 2: 

Qneenes Coll: 
(P. 169.) 

Oct. 30. 



200 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Merton Coll: 
Oct. 30th, 1648. 

Aug: 6: 1649. 



Oct. 13: 1649. 



Jan. 16, 1650. 



v. p. 339: 



Jan. 22, 1650. 

Oct. 3, 1648. 
(P. 208.) 



Mr. Nich: Howson, Fellow ; 
Robt: Bostock, Postmaister ; 
Silvester Switser, Post- 
master 



Mr. Graves, Fellow, and from his Mat: Lect: in the Uni- 

versitie, a see pa: 262. 
Dr. Turner, Fellow. b 

Eemoved upon Order of the 
Committee of Lords and 
Commons, for Non- sub mis- 
sion. 

Mr. Sayer: removed from his Fellowshipp for drunknesse, 
Non-submission and malignancy. 
Blanke 
Wright 
Ampler 
Phillips 

Postmasters; removed upon 
lorneton ^ ,. 

\ Elections contrary to an 

Order of Parliament. 
Pnckett 

Myers 
Stanes 
Moore 
Richmond 
Mr. Brent removed for scandalouse behavour. 



Oct. 3, 1648. 

Ordered, that the revenues of the severall Lectures belonging to 
this Universitie of Oxofi, and due since the vacancie of the said 
Lectures, beimployed to buy Bedle staves for the Universitie; And 
the remainder of the said revenues to goe unto the satisfying the 
Register and other officers now attending the Visitors. 

a Or Professorship of Astronomy. 

b Removed also from his Professorship of Geometry. Turner had been dis- 
tinguished in connection with the Laudian Statutes and Cycle. He had afterwards 
served in the war as a volunteer under Sir John Byron, and been taken prisoner. 

c " This as to the staves was not done; for, if I am not mistaken, they got four or 
five about two years after." (Annals.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 201 

October 3, 1648. Oct. 3, 1648. 

(P. 211.) 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxon: 

Whereas the House of Commons by their Order bearinge date 1 Vid: pa; 215. 
July, 1648, have ordered: That noe Masters or Heads of any Col- 
ledges or Halls, or Schollars, or other persons be admitted into any 
Mastershipp, Governorshipp, Fellowshipp, Schollarshipp, or office, 
or place of preferment or advantage in the Universitie of Oxon: 
And if any such thinge have beene donne is declared to be voyd: 
This Committee, takinge the same into consideration, doe order, 
that the said Order of the House of Commons be effectually pro- 
secuted: And if any thinge hath beene donne contrary to the 
said Order and declaration, that it be forthwith certified to this 
Committee. 

FRANCIS Rons. 

[By the Visitors.] (P. 209.) 

Ordered : That the Vice Chancellor enter the name of Nathaniell 
Carter as Butler of New Colledge into the Buttery Booke of the 
said Colledge : And that an Order be drawne up to that purpose. 

Ordered : That Thomas Thorneton of Queenes Colledge be recom- 
mended to the next voyd scholarship in Corpus Christi Colledge. 

Ordered: That Meredeth Jones and Edward Bucknell be re- 
membred for their good desert for the first Manciple or Butler's 
places that shalbe voyd and in the disposall of the Visitors. 

Oct. 10. 

Resolved: That the Order of the Committee of Lords and Com- Octob. 10. 
mons for the chusinge of Mr. Proctor Button Prebend of Christ ^ 213 , 
Church, and Universitie Orator, be put in execution and his name 
entred into the Buttery Booke of Christ Church aforesaid. 

Ordered: That the submission of Robert Clerke, Demy of Mag- 

CAMD. SOC. 2 D 



202 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Oct. 10, 1648. dalen Colledge, be retourned with the first to the Committee of 
Lords and Commons. 

Ordered : That Mr. Addams, Vice President of Jesus Colledge, 
submittinge one of the first to this Visitation, and thereupon chosen 
one of the Delegates to the Visitors, That his case be certified to 
the Committee of Lords and Commons for this Universitie, with 
the first. 

Ordered: That Mr. Kerrey and Mr. White, entringe into 20 01. 
bond to the Vice Chancellor for Mr. Chibnall Fellow of Magdalen 
Colledge his appearance, and upon sealinge and signinge thereof 
the said Mr. Chibnall is to be released from imprisonment, till 
further Order. 

(P. 2H.) Ordered : That Mr. Pipond, recommended by Captaine Meservey 
for the Jersey place in Jesus Colledge, be taken into consideration 
upon Fryday next, with others for the said Colledge. 

Ordered: That Henry Southam-upon his Petition, and recom- 
pence of his losses, for his good affection be remembred in order 
for some place in the guift of the Visitors. 

Ordered: That the Lodgings of the Auditor of Christ Church, 
which Mr. Kinge enjoyM as Auditor, be delivered to Mr. Samuell 
Bedford, now Auditor in the said Colledge; and in case any dif- 
ference should arise about the deliverie of the same, that the Deane 
and Prebendaries have full power to decide the said difference. 
For Dr. Ordered: That Dr. Du Mullyns, upon his Petition, be dispensed 

w ^ ^ or k* s rea dinge tne present Terme as History Eeader; 
saveing his first Lecture. 

Oct. 11. 

Oct: the llth. Ordered: That the Vice-Chancellor enter the name of S r Gybbons 
into the Butterie booke of Oriell Colledge as Fellow of the said 
Colledge. 

Ordered : That upon a Petition and certificate of Tho: Lathe, late 
Almsman of Christ Church, [he] be reistablished in his said place 
of Almsman in the said Colledge. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 203 

Ordered: That Kaynor be remembred for the next Schollarshipp Oct. 11, 1648. 
in Corpus Christ! Colledge, or another place elswhere. 

Oct. 12. 

Ordered by us the Visitors : That noe person or persons in this Oct: 12: 1648 - 
Universitie of Oxon who have not submitted to the authoritie of 
Parliament in this Visitation shalbe Tutors, or beare any office vid. pa. 250. 
that belongs to Schollars, or have any Vote in the Universitie, or Nonsnbmit- 
in any Colledge or Hall therein : And the Heads and Fellowes G^offices 6S ' 
of the severall Colledges and Halls, and all such as are concerned 
therein, are required to take notice hereof and to cause that our 
Order be observed accordingely. 

Ordered : That the aforesaid Order be executed forthwith in the 
severall Colledges and Halls in this Universitie. a 

Ordered : That Mr. Bragge, S r Burges, and S r Gibbons, elected Octob. 12th. 
Fellowes of Oriell Colledge by the Visitors (in the roome of Mr. 
Sanders, Mr. Chamberlaine, and Mr. Selden), be by spetiall Order 
placed in their chambers. 

Whereas upon an Order of the House of Commons bearinge date (P. 215.) 
July 1: 1648: As also by an Order of the Committee of Lords and Oct: 13: 1648 - 
Commons for Reformation of this Universitie, bearinge date the 3 d ^ k ^^i r tc 
Octob: 1648, all and everie person and persons who have beene elections 
elected into any Mastershipp, Governorshipp,Fellowshipp, Schollar- j^ ly j 16 4 8t 
shipp, or any office, in any Colledge or Hall in this Universitie of v id: p: 211. 
Oxon, since the first of July aforesaid, their elections shalbe null 
and voyd to all intents and purposes: It is now resolved and 
ordered by the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, that accordinge 
to the Orders of the Committee of Lords and Commons, the said 
Order be effectually prosecuted, and that this Order be affixed in 
the severall Colledges and Halls in this Universitie. 

Ordered : That these Questions be reported to the Committee of 
Lords and Commons. 

See note to p. 243. 



204 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Oct. 13,1648. 1 : What shall be donne with those who have not "appeared, and 
the Visitors cannot be iuformed where they are, or with those who 
are beyond sea and without distance? 

2: What shalbe donne with such as have given negative Answeres, 
whose names are not to be found in the Catalogue of the 
Visitors ? 

3: It is Ordered: That the names formerly omitted concerninge 
the aforsaid persons shalbe sent up, and certified to the Committee 
with the first reports. 

Memorand: That Mr. Appletree's sonne be remembred for the 
next schollar's place in Corpus Christi Colledge. 

Oct. 16. 

Oct: 16th. Ordered : That Mr. Lamphire and Mr. Maylard, Bursars of New 
Colledge, should make their personall appearance before the Visitors 
to morrow in the afternoon between the houres of 3 and 6 at the 
President's Lodgings in Magdalen Colledge. 

(P. 216.) Ordered: That Mr. Townesend, and. Mr. Stevens, Fellowes of 

Oct: 17: 1648. New Colledge, be, and hereby are appoynted in this vacancy to 

New Colledge. officiate as Bursars of the Colledge aforesaid : And are further 

enabled, and desired, not only to collect, and receave all Rents, 

and performe the whole office of Bursars, but likewise to take care 

of all the scales, bookes, wrytings, evidences, and goods, which 

belonge to the said Colledge. 

And wee doe hereby give notice to all the Tenants of New 
Colledge, That they pay all rents, and dues payable to New 
Colledge, to Mr. Townesend and Mr. Stevens, or either of them, and 
to noe other. 

Ordered: That whereas it hath beene alledged by Mr. Rouse, 
Library keeper to the Universitie, that Oriell Colledge is indebted 
to him the some of sixtie pownds : It is ordered by the Visitors 
upon the truth of his said information, that his case be considered 
with the first, when any satisfaction is made by the said Colledge 
in that kinde. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 205 

It is this day Ordered: That Mr. Lamphire and Mr. Maylard and Oct: 17: 1648. 
Mr. Tichbourne doe not receave any moneys from this day, as O rd: .con- 

J J J cerning the 

Bursars of New Colledge. Bursars of 

Secondly: That they give an accompt of what they have already New: Coll> 

receaved to Mr. Townesend and Mr. Stevens, who are hereby 

appoynted to take their accompts. 

Thirdly: It is Ordered: That when the tenants of New Colledge 3: 

come in, they bringe their acquittances to Mr. Townesend and 

Mr. Stevens, to compare them with the Leiger Booke of the said 

Colledge. 

Fourthly, That the said Leiger Booke (to avoyde any error) be 4: 

kept in a box, or chest, with three keyes, to be kept, one by Mr. 

Lamphire, and the other two by Mr. Townesend and Mr. Stevens, 

and the booke not to be used but when all are present. 

Oct 18, 1648. 

It is this day ordered that Daniel James, Head Butler and Qct: 18:1648: 
Manciple of Magdalene Colledge, be suspended from the sayd (P- 217.) 
places in the said Colledge: and that another be appoynted by the 
President to supply and execute the said places, until the Com- 
mittee of Lordes and Commons at London determine the said 
business. 

Oct. 20, 1648. 

Ordered: That Mr. Townesend, Mr. Stevens, or either of them, be (p. 218.) 
hereby authorised to breake open the Bursary and Audit house of Oct: 20: 1648: 
New Colledge, or any other place of the Colledge aforesaid, where the thT^nraar^of 
scales, bookes, evidences, wrytings or any goods of the Colledge New Colledge. 
are, or should bee, that they may secure and preserve them, and be 
thereby enabled to discharge that trust which is reposed in them as 
Bursars, for the benefitt of the Colledge aforesaid. 

Memorand: That Mr. Berrie's sonn be remembred for a Querister's 
place. 



206 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Oct p 20 20i 648 ' Whereas Mr> Geor g e Bradshaw, late Fellow of Ballioll Colledge, 
Mr. Brad- is by an Ordinance of Parliament bearinge date July 21, 1648, con- 



stituted Master of the Colledge aforesaid: It is this day Ordered: 
Bal: Coll: That the Vice Chancellor of this Universitie be hereby desired to 
admitt the said Mr. George Bradshaw into the Mastershipp of Bal- 
lioll Colledge, that hee may be settled and confirmed accordingely : 
And wee doe hereby require all and everie Fellow, Schollar, officer, 
and member of the said Colledge to take notice hereof, and yeild 
obedience unto Mr. Bradshaw as Master of the said Colledge ac- 
cordinge to the Ordinance aforesaid. 

Oct. 23, 1648. Orders of Recommendations from the Committee of Lords and 
(P. 219.) Commons received 26 Oct. 1648, by the Visitors. 

Benjamin Ordered That Benjamin Flower, sonn of Mr. Roger Flower, 

Flower for a Minister of Castle Combe in Wiltshire, whoe hath been at Cam- 

Students place . . 

in Xt: Church, bridge about 2 yeares and half, be recommended to the Visitors at 

Oxon for a Student's place in Christ Church in Oxon. 

FRANCIS ROUSE. 

Oct. 23. This Committee, taking into consideration the sufferings and 

King's sonn services of Sir Robert King, doe Order that a Sonn of the said Sir 

for a fellow- Robert's be recommended to the Visitors at Oxon, and the Warden 

Soules. of All-Soules Colledge, respectively, for a Fellowshipp in the said 

Colledg when any shall hereafter be voyd. 

FRANCIS ROUSE. 

Oct:23: Upon motion made to this Committee in behalf of Mr. Vincent 

fora Student's Cupper, whoe hath eight children and suffered much for the Par- 

place in Xt: Hament: It is Ordered : That Tho: Cupper his son, who is of 9 

termes standing in the Universitie, and now of New- Inn-Hall, be 

recommended to the Visitors for a Student's place in Christ Church. 

FRANCIS Rous. 

Oct: 24 1648: At the Committee of Lords and Commons for regulateing the 

Universitie of Oxon : 

(P. 218.) Ordered : That Dr. Sheldon haveing divers business committed 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 207 

to his trust, may follow those businesses in any place, except within Oct. 24, 1648. 
five miles of the Universitie of Oxon, or in the Isle of Wight: 
Mr. Kich: Newdigate of Grayes-Inn, undertakeinge for his ap- 
pearance before this Committee upon fourteen dayes warning, 
notice thereof being left at the Lodging of the said Mr. Newdigate 
in Grayes Inn. 

[By the Visitors.] Oct. 26, 1648. 

Upon consideration of an Order of the Committee of Lordes and Oct. 26, 1648. 
Commons for regulateing the Universitie of Oxon bearing date the 
24th of this instant Octob: It is Ordered: That Dr. Sheldon be 
released of his confinement, and all restraint by any Order or 
Warrant (of the Visitors) is hereby taken off. 

Whereas Dr. Sheldon since his removeall from All-Soules Col- [Order of 
ledg hath taken some horses which belong to the said Colledg ' ^ 
without the consent of the Bursar, or leave from Dr. Palmer, the 
Warden of the Colledg aforesaid: These are to desire you to send 
some of your officers to seize the horses, and returne them to the 
present Bursars for the service of the Colledge. 

Ordered: That this Order for seizing the horses from Dr. Sheldon To Lieutenant 
is hereby reversed and discharged, by and with the consent of Dr. GovernoVoi ' 
Palmer, Warden of All-Soules Colledge. Dec. 18. Oxon: 

Oct 26. 

Whereas we did formerly appoynt Mr. Martyn to supply the ( p - 219 -) 
place of Sub-Rector in Exeter Colledge: Wee doe hereby *fy SnO^ 6 *^ 
and confirme all that the said Mr. Martin hath done in obedience concerning 
to our Orders : and Mr. Martin being called to another employment kdg^Sub-" 
in the said Colledge, and one of his seniours retourned to the Col- Rector, 
ledge : Wee doe hereby appoynt Mr. Mawdit, Fellow of the said 
Colledge, to be Sub-Rector, and by these presents authorize him to 
performe the office of the Sub-Rector in the Colledge aforesayd. 

Meoiorand : That Dr. Hoyle's case in respect to his small meanes Oct. 26, 1648. 



208 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Oct. 26, 1648. in Universitie Colledge, as alsoe of his Lecture of Begins Professor 
in this Universitie of Oxon, be reported to the Committee of Lordes 
and Commons for reformation of the said Universitie. 

Mr. Porter of Whereas doubt has been made whether Mr. Porter were declared 
Exeter Col- 
ledge, Coll: Non-socius at the last election of fellowes in Exeter Colledge: Re- 

socius^ n ~ s l ve d upon the Question : That he then was outed, and another 
legally elected by us the Visitors in his place. 



(P. 220.) 
Oct.27th,1648 

Ord: about 
Trinitie Coll: 



Oct. the 27th. 
An Order 
about 
Senioritie, 
vide p. 230. 



Oct. 27, 1648. 

Memorand : That S r Gibson be remembred for the next Fellow- 
ship in Corpus Christi Colledg. 

It is Ordered : That the Treasury of Trinity Colledge be broken 
open by the President and Fellowes of the said Colledge. 

It is also Ordered : That it be referred unto the President of 
Trinity Colledge aforesaid: whether it is fitt that Francis Dodd 
shall be removed from executeing the Manciple's place in the said 
Colledge or not. 

It is ordered (with the consent of the President of Trinitie Col- 
ledge) that Mr. Mathias Unett be Bursar, and Mr. Tho: Weildey, 
Dean in the said Colledge, to doe and execute all and every act or 
acts belonging to their severall places aforesayd. 

Whereas a doubt was this day moved concerning the right of 
seniority of such Fellowes and Schollers as have been elected into 
Exeter Colledg, in regard some whoe are juniors in the Universitie 
were first elected Fellowes and therefor challenge seniority as seniors: 
It is hereby declared and ordered: That all Fellowes and Schollars 
chosen by the Visitors shall take their senioritie in the severall 
Colleges into which they are chosen according to their respective 
seniorityes in the U niversity, and enjoy all previledges and ad- 
vantages of seniors accordingly, albeit they were not first elected 
or admitted into the said Colledges: And in case any question 
arise touching their seniorities in the Universitie, it is hereby 
referred to the Delegates of the Universitie, where the matter is 
now under consideration. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 209 

Whereas there was a reference from the Committee of Lords Oct. 30, 1648. 

and Commons for the Universitie of Oxon, concerning Mr. Con- Mr - Adams: 

licfcrciicG to 
stantine Adams his submission to the authoritie of Parliament in his Petition 

the Visitation of Oxon and his good affections to the Parliament: ?? ented Oc f 

... 10th, granted 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie doe hereby certefy that the this soth of 

said Mr. Constantine Adams did at the very first beginning sub- 
mitt to the Visitation, and hath ever since continued his good affec- 
tions to the Parliament. 

It is this day Ordered : that the Fellowes elected into Oriell Col- ( p - 221 -) 
ledg by authoritie of Parliament be permitted to peruse the Statutes 
of the said Colledg that they may be acquainted with the rule of 
that government under which they live : And that all the rentalls, 
corn-bookes, and all bookes of account which concern the state 
of that Colledg be forthwith upon sight hereof delivered unto Mr. 
Bragg, Mr. Eston, and Mr. Lomax, who are hereby appointed to 
receive them. 

To whom these presents may concerne. 

It is this day Ordered by the Visitors : That the Provost Marshall 0c 1 t L 3 8 . th ' 
of this garrison of Oxon attend the Fellowes elected into Jesus To the Pro- 
Colledge by authoritie of Parliament, to take possession of their vost Marsha11 - 
several Chambers in the said Colledge according to their seniorities. 81 

Ordered : That Mr. Vice- Chancellor be desired to pay or cause to Oct: 30th. 
be payd the sum of 13 out of the Universitie rents to our Regis- 
ter Mr. Newhous to satisfy him for the monies he hath disbursed in 
our service: Signed by Christoph: Rogers, Pro- Vice Chancellor, 
Robt: Harris, Jo: Mylles, Hen: Wilkinson, Fran: Cheynell. 

Memorand: That Hen: Nobes, Butler of New-Colledge his case Keportes. 
be reported with the first to the Honorable Committee of Lordes 
and Commons. 

a Several Fellows were appointed on Oct. 27. The Welsh College enjoys the 
unique distinction of requiring the aid of the Provost Marshal to establish the now 
comers. See Introduction. 

CAMD. SOC. 2 E 



210 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



Oct: the 31th. 
Reports. 



Nov: 2nd: 



(P. 222.) 

Nov. 2nd. 

Report: 



Nov. 2nd. 
Concerning 
Oriell: Coll. 

1: 



Nov: 2nd. 
I: 
2: 



Whereas it is evident that Joshua Hoyle, Regius Professor of 
Divinitie in this Universitie, hath no competent allowance to sup- 
port the honor and burthen of his place : It is this day Ordered : 
That Dr. Hoyle's case be effectually represented to the Honorable 
Committee of Lordes and Commons for the regulateing this Univer- 
sitie : And that there be some order made to save the Doctor aforesaid 
harmeless from those debts which are cast upon Universitie Colledge. 

Memorand: That Tho: Jones, Jo: Prichard, Wm: Thomas, 
Sam: Jones, Merton Colledge, are to be chosen into Jesus Colledge 
with the first, in case no just exception come against them in the 
mean time. 

Ordered: That nothing be done against Mr. Vaughan, Fellow of 
Jesus Colledge, till he be present to answere for himself what may 
be objected against him. 

Whereas that one Browne [has been] recomended by lettre from 
my Lord Fayfax to a place in New Colledge: Ordered that his case 
be represented to the Committee of Lordes and Commons for Oxon 
with the first, as also the state of New Colledge. 

The humble desire of the Provost and Fellowes of Oriel 
Colledge : 

That since 'tis the judgment of the Visitors that the Fellowes 
lately put in by their Order should have the perusall of the 
Statutes, which was never denied unto them, that the said Statutes 
be by them perused in a Collegiate manner as all other Fellowes 
have done. 8 

And that the Visitors will be pleased to consider how the offices 
of the Treasurer and Bursar may be executed without the prejudice 
of the Colledge. 

Resolved upon the Question : 

That the first of these desires is granted. 

For the second : That such as have been elected Treasurers or 

a This no doubt means in the College Chapel or Hall, where the Members met for 
the purpose. Colleges retained the practice of a public periodical reading of their 
Statutes down to quite recent times. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 211 

Bursars by the Visitors shall for the indemnitie of the Collcdg give Nov. 2, 1C48. 
the same securitie to the Colledg either by oath or otherwise as 
any other have usually done. 

It is this day Ordered : That the Batchelors shall shew all due Nov: 2ml. 
and accustomed respect and reverence to the Maisters: And the thTBatchflo 

Batchelors shall enioy all the priviledges and profitts of Fellowes fellowes 

. . . > ,1 i i T intheUni- 

in their respective Colledges, yet soe as that both Maisters and V ersitie. 

Batchelors shall be Probationers to the Visitors. 

It is this day Ordered by the Visitors: That Mr. Tozer of Exeter (P. 223.) 
Colledge have libertie to use his chamber in the said Colledge, as 
al soe that he enjoy a traveller's allowance'" 1 for the space of three 
yeares, unlesse he be called to any other place inconsistent with the 
said allowance : provided he quietly demean himself, and observe all 
Orders and Ordinances of Parliament without intermedling in the 
government or affayres of the said Colledge, further then his advice or 
directions shall be desired in accountes of that Colledge, for the ' 
advantage of those Fellowes and Members put in or approved by 
the Visitors in the said Colledge. 

Memorand : That Mr. Fisher, S r Denn : Clarck, and Carpender Nov. 2 nd . 
are pre-elected this day into Students' places, the first that falls voyd 
in the Colledge of Christ Church. 

It is this day Ordered by the Visitors: That the Treasurers and 
Bursar elected by their Orders into Oriell Colledge execute their 
several 1 offices according to the Statute of the said Colledg: And 
for the indemnitie of the Colledge put in statutable securitie. And 
lastly that such monies which shall be received by the said Officers 
belonging to the Colledg be kept under severall keyes in such 
manner as the Statutes direct and appoynt. 

11 An ingenious device for making use of Mr. Tozer, who was evidently very neces- 
sary to his college. A " traveller's allowance" was, originally, 6 13*. id. a year. 
(Boase's Keg. Coll. Exonl Ivi.) It was assigned by Sir W. Petre for the support 
of one Fellow on his Foundation, who was to reside four years at some foreign 
University, for the purpose of studying Civil Law or Medicine. It was soon after- 
wards, in Tozer's case, raised to an equality with that of the other Fellowships. 



212 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Nov. 9, 1648. Josias Banger, formerly put out for undue Election, was this day 
9 Coll- chosen againe into Magdalen Colledge. The places of S r Dugdale, 



S r Nicholls, S r Alford, Students of Christ Church, are declared voyd, 
they havinge beene absent divers yeares, and never appearinge to 
doe any exercise. 

Dec. 20'", 1648. Memorand : That Fryday next (beinge the 22 th of this instant 
Dec:) is appoynted for consideration of the businesse of Universitie 
Colledge in Oxon. 

(P. 224.) ft is this day Ordered : That Mr. George Gisby doe appeare upon 

Doc. 20*, 1648. Thursday the 28 th of this instant December at 3 of the clocke in the 

afternoone, before us the Visitors of this Universitie sittinge at 

Magdalene Colledge, and exhibite a true accompt unto us of all 

moneys which the said Mr. Gisby hath receaved or disbursed as 

Bursar of St. John's Colledge in Oxon. 

Mag: Coll: The like Order for Mr. Chibnall, once Bursar of Magdalen 

Colledge. 
Dec. 21, 1648. Memorand : That Mr. Dove be chosen into the next voyd Fellow- 

shipp in Alsouls Colledge. 

The like for Upon readinge a certificate on the behalfe of Walter Portlocke, 
Almsman of*' Alsman of Christ Church in Oxon: It is thought fitt, and Ordered 
Ch: Church. ( soe f arre as \ n us lyes), That hee be restored to his said Alsman's 

place, accordinge to his Patent. 

Dec. 22, 1648. Ordered by the Visitors: That the Orders which imediately 
follow, and were last sent downe from the Committee of Lords and 
Commons (in one of which there was a mistake, and in two of the 
others the name of the Chayreman was omitted) shall be sent up to 
Mr. House, who is desired by the Visitors to certifie the Order in 
which is a mistake, and to subscribe to the other two Orders. 

Nov. 16: 1648. 
Nov. 16, 1648. At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation of 

the Universitie of Oxon: 

Eesolved: That all those that have beene certified to this Com- 
mittee by the Visitors to have beene present in Oxon while it was 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 213 

a garrison against the Parliament, and have absented themselves Nov. 16, 1G48 

since Oxon was reduced to the authority of Parliament, without 

any statutable lycence, or have not renewed their lycence accord- 

inge to the severall statutes of their respective Houses, beinge within 

the Kiugdome of Engeland or Dominion of Wales, shalbe removed 

and deprived from their places in their respective Colledges and 

Halls, and expelled from the Universitie, and others put into their 

places. FRANCIS Kous. 

Kesolved : That all those that were present in Oxon while it was (P- 226.) 

, ,, ,. , No: 16, 1648. 

a garrison against the Parliament, and have absented themselves 

since Oxon was reduced to the authentic of Parliament, without any 
statutable lycence, or have not renewed their lycence accordinge 
to the severall Statutes of their respective Houses, beinge within the 
Kingedome of England or Dominion of Wales, shalbe removed and 
deprived from their places in the respective Colledges and Halls 
and expelled from the Universitie, and others put into their places. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation ofNovemb. 16, 

the Universitie of Oxon: 

Ordered : That the Visitors be required to tender the Negative 
Oathes a to the Maisters, Schollars, Fellowes, and Officers of the 
respective Colledges and Halls, and to certifie concerninge those 
that necglect to take the same. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation ofNovemb: 16, 

the Universitie of Oxon: 

Ordered : That none of those that have submitted since the First 
of September, and have not hertofore expressed some good affection 
to the Parliament, shalbe receaved as Submitters. 13 

FRANCIS Rons. 

ft The Negative Oath abjuring all connection with the King, his council, or officers, 
and submitting to the Parliament without reservation. 

b A decided accession of severity is observable in these Orders. The grand 
tragedy was drawing to its close, and the question of Oxford submission could no 
longer be trifled with. 



214 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Noyerab: 10, At a Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation of the 

Universitie of Oxon: 

Ordered: That Mr. Severne of Christ Church, S r Dropc of 

Magdalen Colledge, and Griffin, the Clerke a of Alsoules, beinge cer- 

(P. 227.) tified by the Visitors not to have submitted to the authoritie of 

Parliament, shalbe put out of their respective places, and others put 

into their places. 

[By the Visitors.] 

Dec. 22, 1648. Ordered by the Visitors: That Doctor Palmer, Warden of Al- 
soules, be desired to procure the Order mistaken, to be certified: 
And likewise Mr. Rons his hand to the other two Orders. 

Dec. 28, 1648. Ordered : That the late Beadles of this Universitie deliveringe up 
their severall staves to the Vice-Chancellor before the 14 th January 

Vid: pa: 273. next ensuinge, may live at their respective houses without moles- 
tation, they behavingo themselves peaceably. b 

Dec. 28, 1648. Ordered by the Visitors : That 
S r Phillipps. 
S r Bedford. 
S r Barksdale. 
S r Foxcroft. 



That these Names be entred into the Buttery Booke of Queenes 
Colledge to-morrow nexte, beinge the 29 th Decemb: 

Dec. 29, 1648. Ordered : That two Fellowshipp in Oriell Colledge shalbe left 
V'd- 1 An O d r vo y^ e O 11 regard of the debts of the Colledge), untill further Order, 
of this day: Ordered: That Mr. Woodhead shall have a chamber in Univer- 

pa i _>.). 

sitie Colledge, with consent of the Fellowes. 

8 There were two Griffins at All Souls, but both were College servants. This was 
the " mistake." 

b This concession to the peccant beadles produced no more effect than the previous 
threats. A year later the colleges are requested to " lend what sums of money they 
shall think fitt " in order to buy staves. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 215 

It is agreed: That Fry day next be appoynted for Universitie Dec. 29, 1648. 
Col ledge businesse. 

Ordered : That Mr. Willis, and Mr. Gealard's places in Exeter ( p - 228 
Colledge remayne voyde, till further Order. Dec - 29 > 1C48 - 

Ordered : That Mr. Dollingson be next chosen into Exeter Colledge 
when any place is voyd of which hee is capable : 

Ordered: That Mr. Culpaper and Mr. Norton, of Alsoules, be 
certified to the Lords and Commons not to have appeared to 
Answeare before the Visitors accordinge to Summons : And that 
Dr. Palmer, Warden of Alsoules, be desired to report the same to 
the Committee of Lords and Commons : 

Ordered by the Visitors: That the Vice-Chancellor be desired to Jan. 4, 1648. 
enter the name of Dr. Hoyle into the Buttery Booke of Christ 
Church Colledge. 

Ordered: That all proceedings in Mr. Wyatt's case of Pembroke 
Colledge be stayd, till the Maister of the Colledge be acquainted 
with it, and his Answeare receaved : And that Mr. Wyatt shall 
have allowance of Battles in the Colledge till the matter be deter- 
myned. 

Ordered : That the President of Trinity Colledge put forth (or Jau. 5*, 1648. 
cause to be put forth) of the Buttery Booke of the said Colledge Order to the 
the names of the persons hereafter mentioned, who are removed Trinl Coll 
from their places, accordinge to a former Order of the Committee 
of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxofi : 

Trinity College. 

Mr. How. 
Mr. Walker. 



M 

Meese. Jan . 



1648- 



Concerninge 
Ordered : That the suspension of S r Wyatt, Schollar of Pembrooke Sr Wyatt of 

Colledge, be taken off: And that hee be left to the Maister, and Colledge. & 



216 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jan. 5, 1648-9. Fellowes of the House to be admitted Fellow into the Abbingeton 
place (lately voyd by the death of Mr. Steede) accordinge to the 
Statutes of the House, unlesse cause be shewed to the contrary 
within this month : and in the meane tyme hee is to enjoy the 
profitts of his Schollar's place. 

Jan. 5 th , 1648. Whereas there hath beene complaint made of some error in 
About proceedinge about seniority in Exeter Colledge : Wee the Visitors 

soniontv in. 

Exeter Coll: hereby Order, That the Statutes of the House be brought before 
us, to be perused in that perticuler, upon Wednesday next, at two 
of the clocke in the afternoone, and such as are concerned therein 
are to attend accordingely. 

Jan. 10, 1648. Upon debate of Mr. Gyles' case (late Fellow of Magdalen 
Mr^GileTof Colledge) hee confessed : That hee bore armes before the surrender 
Mag: Coll: of Oxon : and that when he gave in his Answere to the Visitors 

reasons were shewed why noe more tyme should bee given for 

puttinge in his answere : 

Upon readinge the Lord Generall's Letter concerninge Mr. Giles : 
It is Ordered : That the truth of his case be forthwith drawne up, 
and presented to his Excellency togeather with Mr. Giles his uncivill 
behaviour towards the Visitors at the deliverie of the letter : 

Jan. 10, 1648. Articles were brought against Tho: Welche, Cooke of Trinity 

Mr n Weldfof Colledge: 1: That hee often said: That the Reformation intended 

Trin: Coll: j^y fae Visitors was a deformation : 2 : That hee often drinkes in 

the Celler of the Colledge more then hee puts on for in the Buttery 

Booke : Both which were proved against him by Mr. Phillips and 

Mr. Way, Schollars of the House : 

(P. 230.) Ordered: That Jo: Osburne, kinsman to Mr. Draper, shall have 
Jan. 10, 1648. t ^ e g rgt g cno ll ar ' g place that shalbe voyd, in the guift of the Visitors. 

Brazennose Ordered: That all those who were elected into Brazen Nose Col- 

Coll: ledge before Michaelmas last may receave those profitts from the 

tyme of their Election, though they were not admitted then. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 217 

Ordered : That a coppie of the paper representinge the state Jan. 15, 1648-9. 
of New Colledge be sent to the Lord Say: a and his Lordship 
desired to take the same into consideration : and likewise another 
coppie to Mr. Rous. 

Ordered : Upon the desire of the Fellowes of Exeter, that Mr. Jan. 15. 
Tozer his allowance (upon a former Order) be equall to the rest of 
the Fellowes of the said House. 

Ordered : That Thomas Welch, Cooke of Trinity Colledge, be Jan. 15, 1648. 
suspended from execution and benefitts of his office: And the 
articles and depositions in his case be certified to the Lords and 
Commons for the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxori. 

Whereas there hath beene much difference amongst Fellowes Jan. 19, 1648. 
and Schollars concerninge seniority in Colledges, for the remeadyinge vid: P a: 22 - 
thereof and prevention of the like for the future, it is hereby 
Ordered and concluded : That all graduate Fellowes and Schollars Concerninge 
chosen by the Visitors shall have and enjoy their seniority in their vid: pa^ 283. 
severall Colledges into which they are chosen accordinge to their 298. 

. i . i , . , . . it* i ' (Oct. 29, 1649.) 

seniority in their degrees, which is to be accompted trom their 
presentation: and such as are undergraduates shall take their 
seniority accordinge to their standinge in either of the Universities. 

Whereas there is shortly to be an Election of the Proctors of the (P. 231.) 
Universitie for the next yeare: It is Ordered: That all such as are Jan - 19 > 1648 - 
concerned therein in Alsoules Colledge, New Colledge, Exeter 
Colledge, and Queenes Colledge doe appeare before the Visitors 
on Wednesday next, that soe it may be determined which Colledge 
hath right to the turne of Proctorship for the next yeare. b 

8 Lord Say was of Founder's kin. and had been a Fellow of New College ; he was 
now a leading statesman. 

b This Order was necessitated by the irregularity of the previous year, when 
Joshua Crosse and Ralph Button had been made Proctors for the purposes of the 
Visitation, passing over New College and All Souls, which "malignant" Colleges 
could not then be trusted to provide fit men. The order of the Caroline Cycle was 
not strictly observed again till 1662. 

CAMD. SOC, 2 F 



218 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jan. 19, 1648-9. It is Ordered: That all those who lately committed the disorder 
Ch: Ch: Coll: drinkinge healthes in the hall at Christ Church be put 



out of Commons for a weeke, and loose halfe a weekes allowance 
before their names. a 

The Deane and Canons of Christ Church are desired by the 
Visitors to take some effectuall course for keepinge out of the hall 
at Christ Church the persons under named, viz. : 

Mr. Townsend. Mr. Dayrell. 

Mr. Jackson. S r Love. 

Jan. 22, 1648. To the honorable the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon: The 

humble Petition of the Fellowes of Exeter Colledge. 
Humbly sheweth, 

That whereas wee have receaved certaine information of the 
decease of Dr. Hackwell [Hakewill] b the late Reverend Rector of 
our Colledge, and have thereby an advantage of obtayninge some 
other, who may in the like relation to us become serviceable to God 
amonge us : Wee the Fellowes of the said Colledge, all of us either 
elected, or confirmed by you, beinge encouraged through the libertie 
you have ever graunted us of free accesse to this honorable Court, 
as also the sutable satisfaction wee have found from you in all our 
just and reasonable proposalls this way (which wee with thank- 
fulnesse shall ever acknowledge), humbly crave leave upon this 
present exigence to offer you this our request. 

(P. 232.) That you would be pleased, since wee are by your favor confirmed 
into all the priviledges of Fellowes, as also for that through God 
prosperinge the labour of your love towards us of this place, wee 
are now a number whose judgements and affections wee hope you 
have noe reason to distrust, in a settled and regulated estate, to 
declare your judgements for our right in the matter of electinge a 

" They and the whole table where they sat in Christchurch Hall, drank the 
King's health, standing up and bareheaded." (Annals.) 

b For Hakewill, a person of considerable note, see Boase'sEeg. Col. 
as also for the Fellows whose names appear at the foot of the Petition. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 219 

new Rector, and also to owne us in all right and statutable pro- Jan.i9,i64s-s 
ceedings in order thereunto. 

And your Petitioners as they shall pursue your Order in 
admittinge noe votes of such as have not submitted, soe for our owne 
parte seekinge not soe much our owne things as the things of Jesus 
Christ, shall willingely engage to give you all satisfaction, if soe be 
any exception should be against any person soe elected. 
And your Petitioners shall ever pray, &c. 

John Maudit, Sub-Eector. Peter Fiatt. 

Eobert Handcocke, Deane. Lewis Bradford. 

Francis Howell. Edmund Davis, 

Tho: Masters. William Chudleigh. 

Abraham Batten. Jonathan Wills. 

Sam: Conant. 

The Order thereupon. 

Forasmuch as Exeter Colledge is by Gods blessinge soe reformed Exeter Coll: 
and constituted in the Members thereof as that the Fellowes are in 
a fitt capacity to doe all such acts as concerne the good of that 
House, and they upon the death of their late Reverend Rector have 
petitioned the Visitors that they may proceede accordinge to the 
direction of their statutes to make an election of a new Rector : Wee 
the Visitors doe conceave this desire of theirs to be very just and (P. 233.) 
reasonable, which togeather with the said Petition wee doe humbly 
certifie, and submitt to the consideration of the honorable Com- 
mittee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie. a 

Ordered : That a Certificate be drawne up in Mr. Courtney's Jan. 22, 1648. 
case, and that Doctor Mills be desired to communicate the same 
to the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon. 

Ordered by the Visitors: That this be the Answere in Mr. Hollo- Jan. 24, 1648. 
way's case: 

a Exeter is the first college admitted to self-government. For some remarks on 
its history and condition see Introduction. 



220 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



M H 4 'll 648 " 9 ' ^ at * n re & ar d tne judgement was given in Mr. Holloway's 
case by the Committee of Lords and Commons, and not by the 
Visitors: The Visitors conceive they are not in a capacitye to 
restore Mr. Holloway to his place, nor to reverse, or suspend that 
judgement. But for satisfaction to my Lord Generall's Letter and 
Mr. Holloway's desire, they will transmitt the Petition and Letter, 
and proceedings in that businesse before us, to the Committee of 
Lords and Commons for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Proctors Ordered by the Visitors : That the Proctors for the yeare 1649 

shalbe nominated by New Colledge and Alsoules: provided that 
they nominate fitt persons and such as have submitted to the 
authoritie of Parliament in this Visitation. And that the next 
yeare Exeter Colledge and Queenes Colledge doe succeede in the 
same nomination : and soe afterwards the Elections to proceede in 
the Order of the Cycle. 

This was Ordered : That Mr. Francis Lownes, and Mr. Michaell "Wells, 

Dec. 29. Fellowes of Jo: Baptist Colledge in Oxon be, and hereby are, 

St. John's Coll: equally appoynted, and entrusted to receave, keepe, and expend 

the rents belonginge to John Baptist Colledge in a statutable way, 

as Bursars of the said Colledge. And that they have an equall 

share in the profitts of the Bursarship. 

(P- 234.) Jan: 25, 1648. 

Att the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Reformation 
of the Universitie of Oxon : 

Mr. Marshall, Whereas it appeared to this Committee and accordingely was 
New Coll. resolved, That Doctor Henry Stringer was guilty of high contempt, 
and denyall of authoritie of Parliament : and for an effectuall 
remeady thereof it was also resolved : That the said Doctor Stringer 
be removed from beinge Warden of New Colledge in the Universitie 
of Oxon: It is now resolved, by this Committee: That Mr. George 
Marshall be Warden of the said Colledge, and hereby hce is con- 



THE VISITORS' REGISTEB. 221 

stituted and established Warden thereof, to all intents and purposes, Jan. 25, 1648-9. 

and shall enjoy and have all the power, profitts, rights, emoluments, 

roomes, and lodgings, by any Statute, Custome, or Right, formerly 

belonginge to the Warden of the said Colledge : And the Senior 

Fellow in the said Colledge is hereby required to publish this Order 

to the Fellowes, Schollars, and others of the said Colledge, who are, (P. 235.) 

or may be concerned in the knowledge hereof: And the Fellowes, 

Schollars, and others of the said Colledge, are hereby required to 

receave, respect, obay, and submitt, to the said Mr. George Marshall 

as Warden of the said Colledge, as they will Answere the contrary 

at their perills : And that the former Order of this Committee for 

removinge Doctor Stringer, and this Order for establishinge Mr. 

Marshall Warden of the said Colledge, be entred into the Register of 

the said Colledge : 

FRANCIS Rous. 

[By the Visitors.] 

Ordered : That the Letter of recommendation concerninge Mr. CP- 234 
Acland be communicated to the Fellowes of Exeter Colledge. a Jan - 29< 

Ordered : That a Narrative of the businesse betweene Mr. Hoi- Mr. Sprig and 
loway and Mr. Sprigge be irawne up, and transmitted to the Com- 
mittee of Lords and Commons, togeather with Mr. Holloway's 
Petition, and the Lord Gen grail's Letter thereupon. 

Ordered : That Sympson of Magdalen Hall shall have the next 
Querister or Clerk's place that shalbe voyd in New Colledge. 



William Bew 
Ed: Allanson 



These two were presented to the Visitors as 
capable of the Proctershipp. b 



a See note to p. 130. 

b See note to p. 217. Both of these were rejected. Bew, or Beaw, was the Fellow 
of New College who afterwards became Bishop of Llandaff. Allanson was certainly 
not a Fellow of All Souls, and seems to have been the Fellow of New College men- 
tioned in p. 4, as one of the Delegates to Visitors. If so, it was unheard of that 
any College should have two Proctors. 



222 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

March 5"^ Ordered : That Wilmington, once Schollar of Winchester, beinge 
1648-9. examined and approved, submittinge to the Visitors, and bringinge 

(sic). l {Ris n a Testimoniall of his good conversation, shall be chosen into a voyd 

name was Fellowship in New Colledge. 

Henry Win- 

nington.] 

Mar. 5, 1648. Whereas by the Statute of Wadham Colledge, the Warden thereof 
Wadham * s re( l u i re d within one yeare after hee is admitted to that place to 
take the degree of Doctor in Divinity : And that Mr. Wilkins the 
present Warden is at this tyme in attendance on the Prince Elector, 
and cannot in regard of that service have tyme to doe his exercise, 
and all other things necessary unto that degree : It is therefore 
Ordered by the Visitors : That the said Mr. Wilkins be for this 
twelve monthes next ensuinge dispenced with for takinge the same 
degree. 11 

March 5 th ,! 648. Ordered: That Doctor Mansell doe forthwith give up the keyes 
Dr. Mansell. an( j sea ] es> an( j wn at other things hee hath in his hands that belongs 
to Jesus Colledge, into the hands of Mr. Roberts, the Principall of 
the Colledge : As also that Doctor Mansell doe make his accompts 
to the Principall, which doe concerne the Colledge, within these 14 
daies. b 

March 8, 1648. Ordered: That after Mr. Fulke's sonne and Mr. Hawe's sonne be 
sped, Mr. Dobson his sonne shall be remembred. 

a This Dispensation was in accordance with precedents, and so betokens a regard 
for academical order. The necessity for granting degrees by the fiat of Parliament 
had passed away, and the practice had indeed been but sparingly resorted to. For 
Wilkins' relations to his College, see below. In spite of the Warden's absence, 
Wadham was (along with Trinity) the next, after Exeter, Christchurch, and 
Merton, to be admitted to the privilege of electing its own Fellows. Numerous 
expulsions had made way for a large body of new Fellows and Scholars. 

b This must certainly not be taken as any delinquency on the part of Dr. Mansell. 
Not only, as is observed in his "Life," p. 16, did he "apply himself," after his 
ejection in May, 1648, " to state all accounts between himself and the College," but, 
even when "reformed," his College valued him so highly that in 1651 he was 
invited to occupy a room within its walls. See, further, note below. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 223 

Upon complaint made by the Register, and other Officers attend- Mar. 8, 1648-9. 
inge the Visitors, That divers Fellowes and Schollars admitted into 
Colledges have not paid the fees appoynted by the Visitors for the Kinge: Hitch- 
Orders of their admission : "Wee hereby Order, That the Manciple Banger: dis- 
of everie Colledge (with consent of the Head of the Colledge) shall penced with 

j j , c - T- 11 j c i. 11 j ii bv the Dele - 

aemaund, and receave (from everie r ellow, and bchollar, and others gates for two 
admitted into places that have not yet paid) such fees as were Tearmes - 
appoynted by a former Order: that is, 10 s from everie Fellow, 6 s 8 d 
from everie Schollar, and the like : or els shall sett the same upon 
their names in the Buttery Booke, and receave it of the Bursars of 
the respective Colledges, for the aforesaid Officers. 

It is declared and Ordered : That all Governors and Officers of (P. 236.) 
Colledges and Halls within this Universitie, doe take care to uphold March 8 th ,l648. 
the excercises and discipline in their severall Houses respectively, accordinto 
and governe accordinge to the perticuler Statutes and laudable Statute. 
Customes of the said Houses : and accordinge to such Orders and 
Injunctions as are and shalbe made in this Visitation for Reforma- 
tion by authoritie of Parliament : except in such spetiall cases of 
Statute where evident reason to be approved by the Visitors in order 
to the Reformation intended by the Parliament shall appeare to the 
contrary. 81 

Ordered: That upon Wednesday next the case be heard betweene March 15 th , 
Mr. Sprigge, and Mr. Hollo way, whereof Mr. Sprigge is to have 1648 - 
notice that hee may attend, and in the meane tyme draw a narrative 
of proceedings in the businesse, and bringe the same to the Visitors 
at the tyme prefixed. 

a This is an important Order of the Visitors, since it proves their desire to govern 
the University and Colleges according to their ancient Statutes. The "special 
cases " to the contrary were to be wholly exceptional, and there must be " evident 
reason to be approved by the Visitors." Five months later the need of a further 
organization for the purposes of the Visitation seems to have impressed itself upon 
the minds of the Visitors; and indeed, as early as April 5, they had determined to 
make special inquiries. See Introduction. 



224 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Mar. 15,1 648-9. Kesolved: That the aforesaid Order [of March 8j be sent to the 
Head of everie Colledge and Hall in this Universitie of Oxoii. 

March 21 th , Ordered by the Visitors : That Mr. Sprigg be desired to certefy 

Concerning under his hand to the Visitors whether he did not consent to the 
Mr. Sprigg and transmitting of a narrative of the proceedings to the Committee of 
Lords and Commons in the case betweene himself and Mr. Holloway, 
or that an Order to that effect was not made in the presence of him- 
self and Mr. Holloway, and no exceptions taken thereunto by him : 
And whether the Order of the Visitors for transmitting the said 
narrative, made the 29 th of Jan: last, were not after the reception of 
the Generall's second Lettre a to the Visitors. And such certeficate 
to be returned presently to the Visitors, or the next sitting of the 
Visitors, as he shall think best. 



March 21 th . 
Concerning 
Exeter Coll: 



(P. 237.) 



March 21 th . 



Upon consideration of a paper presented this day by divers 
Maisters of Art in this Universitie of Oxofi to the Visitors, and the 
earnest desire of divers Fellowes of Exeter Colledge there present, 
pressing the great debts b of the said Colledge, for some of which 
they are already sued to an extent, doe think fitt, and Order: That 
Mr. Willott and Mr. Gillard's Fellowshipps now voyd, and four Fel- 
lowshipps more, as they shall fall voyd, be continued and so remain 
voyd, till the Colledge be in capacity, by satisfying their present 
debts, to admitt of more Fellowes, and that the profitts of the said 
Fellowshipps be converted for the satisfying of the Colledge debts, 
and to no other use. 

Memorand: That John Kempster be remembred to be preferred 
to the next voyd Schollershipp in Universitie Colledge. 



a These letters are not entered in the Register. 

b Conant, when, shortly after this Order was issued, he became rector, "found the 
College oppressed with great debts, though honourably contracted in good measure 
by assisting the King in the late troublesome times." (Life, p. 11.) No doubt, the 
temporary suppression of Fellowships was the best way of dealing with the case. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 225 

Whereas the Visitors by a former Order thought fitt that the March 2l lh , 
Register and other Officers attending them should be payd their 
salaries out of the profitts of vacant Lectures* according to the 
direction of the Committee of Lords and Commons for regulating 
the Universitie of Oxford: and in pursuance thereof the Vice- 
Chancellor, by order of the Visitors, did accordingly pay the summ 
of thirteen poundes to the said Register for some disbursements Concerning the 
layd out by him in the said Visitation : It is now thought fit and office 

Ordered that twentie pounds be forthwith payd by the Vice-Chan- ing to the 

V isitors 
cellor out of the Mathematique Lectures to be disposed to the use of 

the said Register : And that the Convocation be moved to allow 
and order the same, and such further summes to be raised out of 
the profitts of vacant Lectures as aforesaid, to be disposed by the 
Visitors unto their said Officers in recompence of their great paines 
and long attendance, according to the directions of the said Com- 
mittee of Lordes and Commons. 

Mr. Carill of Christ Church upon his humble Petition shalbe 
elected, &c. 

Whereas John Caricke was lately removed from Christ Church March 29 th , 
for his Non-submission to the Visitation, but hath now made his Mr^Carrick of 
humble adresses to the Visitors and submitted to the Visitation: Ch: Ch: 
And also whereas his father hath spent much tyme in the service of 
the Parliament, wherein hee hath receaved many and dangerouse 
wounds to the hazard of his life, and hath now made his humble 
request to us in the behalfe of his sonne : It is therefore Ordered, 
That the said John Caricke shalbe admitted as Commoner into 
Christ Church, and upon his good behavior shalbe capable of further 

a Perhaps the Professors were not considered as useful as the Register. The 
University could do without the one, and not without the other. A whole year had 
elapsed since the Visitation commenced in earnest ; and such men as Wallis and 
Seth Ward were at hand. They were soon afterwards appointed. No doubt it was 
found more difficult to eject Graves and Turner than French ; and yet they were far 
more decided Eoyalists. 

CAMU. SOC. 2 G 



226 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



March 29, 
1649. 



(P. 238.) 



March 29 th , 
1649. 



March 29 th , 
1649. 

State of New 
Coll: 



favor for Election into a Student's or Schollar's place in the said 
Colledge or elswhere. 

Whereas divers Undergraduates have beene voted a into Fellow- 
ships in New Colledge : It is declared that all such which are or 
shalbe chosen into the said Colledge shall undergoe their yeares of 
Probationership accordinge to the Statutes, unlesse some spetiall 
cause to be approved by the Visitors shall allow a Dispensation to 
the contrary. 

Upon consideration of the case of Mr. William Huntly, beinge 
formerly chosen Fellow of New Colledge, and now desiringe to be 
admitted Fellow without undergoinge his yeares of Probationer- 
shipp: Forasmuch as hee alledges that for those two yeares and 
upwards he hath beene of Queenes Colledge and five yeares of Win- 
chester, and upon the Roll to have beene admitted into New Col- 
ledge: but by reason of these warrs hee hath lost three yeares 
tyme, which was most part spent in the service of the Parliament : 
It is thought fitt, upon these spetiall allegations, prooffe thereof 
beinge first made : That hee be forthwith admitted Fellow without 
undergoinge any Probationershipp. 

Ordered : That a letter be written to my Lord Say b to let him 
understand, that the state of New Colledge is yet very much 
unsetled, and that therefore, upon the desire of the Warden, the 
Visitors have ordered to represent the Condition thereof to the 
Committee, and to desire some such explication of their former Votes 
as by which they may be the better enabled to proceede to the 
speedy setlinge thereof: which representation they have yet thought 
needefull to offer first unto his Lordship that hee may thereupon 
doe what his wisdome and affection to that Colledge shall direct. 

That the spetiall cases of the servants of New Colledge be also 
retourned to the Committee. 

a Meaning " appointed." 

b Lord Say's position as quasi- Visitor of New College is explained in the note to 
p. 217. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 227 

Ordered : That Mr. Zankey, a Fellow of Alsoules, slialbe Sub- Marcl > 29 th , 

1649 
Warden in Alsoules Colledge in Oxford : and Mr. Siddenham 

a Zanchy, or Zankey, or Sankey, was a personage very characteristic of the times. 
Originally a Cambridge man, and now a colonel in the Parliamentary army and 
friend of Cromwell's, he appears at the head of the list of Fellows of All Souls, 
placed there by the Visitors in July 1648. Whether he had been there too short a 
time to acquire the full confidence of the Visitors, or whether his merits became 
more conspicuous when the King was dead, and Cromwell virtually at the head of 
affairs, it is curious that on Jan 24, 164f , All Souls, whose turn it was, should not be 
allowed a Proctor, or did not present one ; and yet that Zanchy should be made by 
the Visitors Subwarden of the College in March, 1649, and Proctor in April ; he 
having been appointed by the Proctors one of the Delegates in November, 1648. 
(Reg. Conv. T. p. 23.) As Snbwarden he received Cromwell at All Souls in May 1649, 

and as Proctor presented him for his degree, brevi sed accurata oratione 

corpore qfficiose prostrato. (Ib. p. 45.) But the change from camp to College was 
perhaps too violent. His Fellowship is declared "void " in 1653, and Oxford bears 
no more of the Colonel-Proctor. He had, in fact, scarcely resided at all, and had long 
ago gone off to Ireland, where he played a considerable part. Notices of him will be 
found in Cromwell's Letters, Whitelocke's Memorials, Prendergast's Cromwellian 
Settlement, and Sir Thomas Larcom's edition of Petty's Down Survey (Irish Archaeo- 
logical Society). Whitelocke frequently mentions him as successful in combats with 
the Irish, while commanding under Ireton, in 1650 and 1651, large bodies of troops; 
and he had an independent command in Tipperary. Henry Cromwell, who succeeded 
Ireton, knighted him; but this does not prevent his joining Lambert against Richard 
Cromwell, and demanding the recall of the members of the Long Parliament. He 
assists in putting down the Royalist risings, and is one of the Committee of Safety in 
1659. It is then that we find him begging Whitelocke to serve on the Committee with 
him as a counterpoise to Vane and the extreme Republicans. Soon after, he joins 
Monk, and declares for a free Parliament. His oratorical powers found wider fields 
of exercise than the University had afforded. In the Irish Parliament, and after- 
wards in the English (in 1658), we find him, in the most vehement, racy, and truly 
Cromwellian style, denouncing his deadly enemy, William Petty, the Oxford Pro- 
fessor, for alleged frauds and misdemeanours in carrying out his great, original 
Survey of Ireland. But Petty went his own way. They had measured one another 
before. He had in fact prevented Sir Hierom Zanchy from exchanging a tract of 
land which had fallen to him by lot, for some better land which he proposed to seize 
in true military fashion ; and the heinousness of the offence was increased by the 
circumstance that Zanchy was concerned throughout the Cromwellian Settlement as 
the agent for allotting the lands to the army. Petty successfully defied any one to 
prove the charges made against him. The Restoration separated the combatants. 
Zanchy died in obscurity in Ireland. From Sir William Petty, knighted in 1661, 
the great house of Lansdowne traces its descent. 



228 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

March 29, Senior Bursar: and Mr. Upton Junior Bursar: Mr. Birkenhead 
Deane of Arts: and Mr. Rouse Deane of Law. 

(P. 239.) Upon the desires mentioned in a Letter from the Master of 

M 5a ch 29t "' Universitie Colledge : Mr. Silvester shalbe readmitted into his 
Mr. Silvester. Exhibitioners place in the aforesaid Colledge. 

Aprill5;,l649. It is Ordered: That the Deane and Prebends of Christ Church 

Cb. S . 6rS D : i n tng i r n ext Election, if they thinke fitt, shall dispose of the vacant 

places in Christ Church to Maisters and Batchlors of Arts, for fur- 

nishinge the said Colledge with Tutors and such as are fitt to beare 

Office in the said Colledge. a 

Aprill 6 th . Ordered : That Dr. Mansell doe personally appeare before us the 

Mansel. Visitors on Thursday next beinge the twelvth day of this instant 

Aprill, to shew cause why hee hath not fulfilled the Order of the 

5 th of March last past, and to answere to such other Matters as 

shalbe then alledged and objected against him. b 

Aprill 5 th , 1649. Resolved: That the Colledges in this Universitie shalbe visited 

visited^ 6 ^ perticulerly to enquire of the manners of all the Members thereof, 

in relation to the severall Statutes that ought to be observed : And 

to enquire of whatsoever is contrary to the Reformation begunne 

and intended by the Visitors. 

Aprill 5 th , 1649. Ordered : That whereas [Thomas] Througmorton in Balioll 

of BalrofcoU- Colledge in Oxon, havinge beene formerly (by an Order of the 

Committee of Lords and Commons) expelled the Universitie for his 

high contempt of the authoritie of Parliament, and havinge also 

since behaved himselfe (in many perticulers) contemptuously towards 

the Visitors in neglectinge their comaunds and disregardinge their 

indulgence and favor which they shewed him in hope of his 

a Christchurch takes rank after Exeter, as the second to obtain independent 
action. 
b See note p. 222. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 229 

Reformation : and also affronted the Government of this Universitie : April 5, 1649. 
That hee shall therefore be expelled the Universitie, and forthwith 
depart the same upon his perill. 



April 10 1649. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for the Eeformation of (P. 244.) 

the Universitie of Oxon: Orders of the 

Committee for 



Upon the humble Petition of Richard Quelch, Fulke Stevenson, 
James Jennings, William Culley, Mathew Gelliman, William Grove, of Oxon. 
and John Blake, inhabitants in Oxon : and upon the certificate of 
the Maior and others in their behalfe: It is ordered: That the 
Petitioners be recommended to the Visitors of the Universitie of 
Oxon to be put into such places in New Colledge, or any other 
Colledge in the said Universitie, as now are, or shalbe voyd, and 
they shalbe judged capable of and able to discharge. 

FRAN: Rons. 



April 10: 1649. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 
University of Oxon : 

Ordered: That it be referred to the Visitors of the Universitie 
of Oxon and the Warden of New Colledge, respectively, to elect 
thirteene more, either Masters of Arts, Civilians, Bachelors of 
Divinity, or any other higher degree, into New Colledge, in the 
place of those that are or shalbe ejected by authoritie of Parlia- 
ment, for carryinge on of the Government of the said Colledge 
accordynge to Reformation, notwithstandinge the Votes of the 
Committee of the Second of August, 1648. a 

FRANCIS Rons. 

See p. 231. The Order of April 26th is almost identical with this of April 10th. 



230 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 10, 1649. April 10: 1649. 

(P. 245.) At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 

University of Oxon: 
Resolved : 

That all Fellowes, Scholars, or Officers of any Colledge or Hall 
in the University of Oxon that continued in Oxon while it was 
a garison against the Parliament, and have absented themselves 
since Oxford was reduced to the authoritie of Parliament without 
any statutable lycence, or have not renewed their lycence ac- 
cordinge to the severall Statutes of their respective Houses, shalbe 
removed, and deprived from their places in their respective Col- 
ledges and Halls, and expelled from the Universitie: And the 
Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon are to proceede herein accord- 
ingely. a 

FRA: Rons. 

Apr: 10: 1649. 

At the Committee of Lords and Commons for Reformation of the 

Universitie of Oxon: 
Ordered : 

That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe effectually put 
in execution the former Orders of this Committee for removinge 
Fellowes, Scholars, officers, and members from their severall places 
and offices in New Colledge in Oxon, respectively. 

FRAN: Rous. 

Apr: 26: 1649. 
At the Committee for Reformation of the University of Oxon: 

Ordered : 

That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe retourne to 
this Committee, at their next sittinge, the names of such officers 

a " This Order," says Wood, " was put in execution the middle of May following, 
making many more places yoid." (Annals.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 231 

and servants of New Colledge as were not entred into the Buttery April 26,1649. 
Booke of the said Colledge, and have given in their Answere to 
them whether they submitt to the authoritie of Parliament in the 
Visitation or not: And likewise the names of such of them as did 
not appeare upon summons. 

Concordat cum originali. 

ROBERT NEEDLER. 



Apr: 26: 1649. 
At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: (P. 246.) 

Ordered : 

That the House be moved that the Ordinance for ^Visitation and 
Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon may extend to Winchester 
Colledge, and that Mr. George Marshall, the Warden of New 
Colledge, be joyned with the Visitors: And Mr. Martin is desired 
to move the House therein.* 

Concordat cum originali: 

Ro: NEEDLER. 

Apr: 26: 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 

Whereas complaint is made to this Committee by the Warden of 
New Colledge, that the Reformation of the said Colledge could 
not effectually proceede without a further addition of Fellowes in 
that Colledge for the right bestowinge of Benefices upon godly and 
able persons, and for gettinge of leases : It is therefore Ordered : 
That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, and the Warden of 
New Colledge respectively, doe proceede to the chusinge of thirteene 

a It became necessary to obtain this power as a matter of course. St. Mary 
Winton and New Colleges were too closely united by their common Founder to be 
treated separately. 



232 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 26, 1649. more Fcllowes in the places of those removed by authorise of 
Parliament into New Colledge aforesaid, for the effectuall carrying 
on of affaires of the said Colledge, accordinge to Keformation, 
notwithstandinge the former Order of this Committee, of the Second 
of August last, 1648. 

FRAN: Rous. 

Die Veneris 4 Maij 1649. 

Ordered by the Commons assembled in Parliament : That it be 
referred to the Committee formerly appoynted for regulatinge the 
University of Oxon, to take care of the regulatinge the Universitie 
of Cambridge and Winchester Colledge: And that they be im- 
(P. 247.) powred with the same power for Cambridge that the Committee 
had for Oxon, and also like power for the Colledge of Winchester. 

Mr. Corbett. Cap: Smith. 

Mr. Burrell. Mr. James Challener. 

Sir Hen: Mildmay. Mr. Whittacre. 

Mr. Lister. Sir Hen: Vane, sen. 

Com: Gen: Ireton. Sir Hen: Vane, jun. 

Sir William Armyn. Mr. Garland. 

Mr. Cowley. 

Mr. Love. [The above] are added to that Committee. 

Coll: Fielder. Hen: Scobell. 

Sir Jo: Bourcher. Cler: Parliament. 

Mr. Frenchard. 

May 10: 1649. 
At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 

Ordered : That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe the 
next weeke effectually put in execution the former Orders of this 
Committee, for removinge and deprivinge from their places all Fel- 
lowes, Schollars, and officers of Colledges in Oxon that have absented 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 233 

themselves without statutable lycence, or have not renewed their Ma 7 1> 
lycence accordinge to the severall Statutes of their respective Col- 
ledges: And that an accompt hereof be given by them within 
foureteene daies to this Committee. 

FRAN: Rous. 

May 10 th 1649. (P. 259.) 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon : 

Ordered: That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, now in officers of 
London, doe meete to consider of the Officers of New Colledge in New Co ^ : 
Oxon who did not appeare upon Summons, nor gave in their 
Answere before the first of September last, and certifie their names 
to this Committee, with all convenient speede. 

FRAN: Rous. 

May 24: 1649. (P. 247.) 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: and 

Cambridge, and Colledge of Winchester. 
Ordered : 

That there be noe transmission of Scholars from Winchester 
Colledge to New Colledge in Oxon till the next Election: Pro- 
vided that this Order shall not prejudice any of the superanuated 
Scholars soe they be judged deservinge. 

FRAN: Rous. 

May 24: 1649. ( p - 248 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 
and Cambridge. 

Ordered : 

That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe retourne to Officers in 
this Committee a positive Certificate of such Officers of New 
Colledge in Oxon as did not appeare upon Summons, nor give in 
their Answere to them, before the first of September last, 1648. 

CAMD. SOC. 2 H 



234 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 24, 1649. This was mentioned in the Committee and seems fitt soe farre to 
be fulfilled that the Keformation may goe forward amonge the 
officers. 

FRAN: Kous. 

May 24: 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universities of Oxon: 

and Cambridge. 
26 Fell: into Ordered: That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon and the 

JJpw C^oll* 

Warden of New Colledge doe chuse into the said Colledge their 
number of twentie and six Fellowes, accordinge to the former 
Orders of this Committee, bearinge date the 10 th and 26 th of April 
last, before the next Election of Scholars from Winchester Colledge. 

FRAN: Rous. 

[By the Visitors.] 

May 24, 1649. Whereas Marke Hildesley hath voluntarily resigned his Schollar- 

(P. 239.) ship in Corpus Christi Colledge into the hands of the Visitors : 

The Visitors doe hereby elect and nominate Samuell Ashurst a unto 

a Scholarship in the said Colledge in the place of the said Mr. 

Hildesley. 

(P. 240.) Ordered: That it be hereby certified That Dr. Oliver Lloyd, 

May 29, 1649. j) r Nicholas Graves, Dr. of Divinity, Mr. Harringeton, and Mr. 

Bagley, Fellowes of Alsoules, have not appeared before us as they 

were required upon Summons by severall Orders and Ordinances of 

Parliament. 

May 29, 1649. Ordered : That the Heads and Governours of every Colledge in 

Lycence. Oxon, respectively, doe within three daies after the sight hereof 

certifie unto us under their owne hands in wrytinge what Fellowes, 

Schollars, or Officers of their perticuler houses have absented 

a Probably a relative of Thomas Ashhurst. See note to p. 238 and p. 247. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 235 

themselves without statutable lycence, or have not renewed their May 29, 1649. 
lycence, accordinge to the severall Statutes of their respective 
Houses.* 

Ordered : That George Atherton, the sonne of Mr. Atherton, a May 29 th . 
learned and godly Minister, spetially recommended to us by the Geo. Ather- 
Prolocutor, b be forthwith preferred to some schollar's place, because 
his father is exceedinge poore, and hath a very great charge of 
children. 

Ordered : That Mr. Lovell's sonne be remembered for a Schollar's May 29 th . 
place in New Colledge, the next after thirteene are first chosen 
into the said Colledge. 

Ordered : That Mr. Longe shall receave the full profitts of his May 29 th . 

Fellowshipp in Oriell Colledge. due from the tyme of his election : Mr. Long of 
A j ru m .- 4 , c j ,- Oriell Coll: 

And wee require the Treasurers to take notice thereof, and pay him 

accordingely. 

Ordered: That the Answere of William Finch, Head Cooke of May 30 th , 1649. 
New Colledge, and William Flexney, Barbor, be retourned amonge 
the Submissions given in before the First of September last. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon: doe require all the May 31 th , 1649. 
Fellowes, Schollars, Officers, and Members of New Colledge now ^ em ^ er 1 s , of 

. ~ , i i n NeW C 11: 

present in Oxon, to appeare before us tomorrow, beinge the nrst 
day of June, at the Warden's lodginge, betweene two and foure of 
the clocke in the afternoone. 

Ordered: That the names of Mr. lies and Mr. Gales, Students of May 31. 
Christ Church, be put out of the Buttery Booke there, accordinge 

n Perhaps the vigour of this Order may be traced to the visit of the " Generals," 
which had just taken place. It was certainly time that whatever had to be done for 
the "reform" of the University should be completed. There is a good account of 
this visit in Wood's Annals, chiefly taken from the Register of Convocation T. Its 
effects are noticed in the Introduction. 

b Of the Assembly of Divines. 



236 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



History 
Reader. 



May 31, 1649. to a former Order: And that Mr. Ward be admitted into one of 
their places. 

(P. 241). Ordered: That this Certificate followinge be transmitted to the 
ay ' ' ' Committee above for Kegulatinge the Universitie of Oxon. 

It is hereby humbly Certified that there was a Convocation called, 
and upon the Second of August, 1647, held for the electinge and 
admittinge of an History Reader, which Convocation was both 
called and held by Doctor Fell who did then excercise the place 
and authoritie of the Vice Chancellor, although hee was not that 
yeare elected by Convocation unto that office, nor soe much as 
nominated thereunto by Marquesse Hartford. Moreover the said 
Doctor Fell was prohibited by the Articles of Oxford to intermeddle 
in Government, and by an expresse Order of July the Second, 1646, 
to admitt any Master, Head, Schollar, or other person into any 
Office or place of preferment or advantage in the Universitie of 
Oxford : 

Finally there was an Appeale entred in the presence of Dr. Fell 
and the rest of the Doctors, Masters, Regent and not Regent, at 
that very tyme, by Mr. Charles Whare, a who protested against the 
nomination, election, and admission of Mr. Waringe to the office 
of the History Reader, and appealed from that Convocation to the 
Chancery, as is evident by the Act of that Convocation certified 
under the hand of the Register of this Universitie. And yet not- 
withstandinge the Appeale aforesaid and Order aforesaid Mr. 
Waringe was presently admitted to the Office of History Reader. 

May 31, 1649. Accordinge to an Order of the Committee for Regulatinge the 
Servants of Universitie of Oxon, dated May 10, 1649 : Wee doe hereby Certifie 
that Nathaniell Leech, Manciple, William Finch, Sen: Cooke, 

a Or " Whear," son of Mr. Degory Whear, the first Camden Professor of Ancient 
History, chosen hy Camden himself, and who had educated this son with a view to 
his filling his own place; but Du Moulin was appointed on the expulsion of Waring. 
Mr. D. Whear had also been a very successful Principal of Gloucester Hall, after- 
wards Worcester College. (Annals.) 



New Coll: 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



237 



William Shaw, Groome, John Smith, Porter, and Stubbs, Gardiner, May 31, 1649. 
Servants of New-Colledge in Oxofi, did not appeare, nor give in 
any Answere to the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, before the 
first of September last. 



Examined : a 

March 8, 
1648. 



John Brice r mel: 

Praesentibus 

Mr. Button. 
Mr. Langley. 
Mr. Cornish. 



Examined : 

March 15 th , 1648. 

Lawrence Stafford ") / p r8es entibus 

Fran: Mayd j T 

Jl Mr. Button. 

Mr. Langley. 
mediocriter. Mr. Cornish. 



John Ousley 
Pembr: 1 yeare 

Examined : 



May 28, [1649]. 



Tho: Coles 

Bayl: Coll: 2 years 

Samuell Holeman 
Aulae Nouj Hosp: 



| mel: 






Praesentibus 


j mel: 


? Mr. Langley. 
Mr. Cornish. 




Mr. Wilkinson. 


r bene. 





(P. 242.) 



ft This is the only entry of examinations held by the Board constituted by the 
Order of July 5, 1648. The rest were no doubt registered in some separate book. 



238 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 6, 1649. Ordered: That all those who were lately chosen Fellowes into 
Probationers iu Exeter Colledge in Oxon shall be Probationers to the Visitors, and 

not to the Colledge: And shall enjoy all the [same] priviledges as 

other Fellowes of the said house. 

Jane 6, 1649. Ordered : That the President and Fellowes of Corpus Christi 

1 resident ot ... T 

C: C: C: Colledge shew cause (within three daies after the receipt hereof) 
why William Chidley B: D: (a Senior Chaplin in C: C: C:) should not 
enjoy the profitts of his place in the said Colledge, as hee hath donne 
heretofore. 

June 6, 1649. Whereas a paper was recommended to the Visitors concerninge 
Ashurst Thomas Ashurst and William Ashurst: The Visitors doe referre the 

(Ayrest or sa me to the Master and Fellowes of Universitie Colledge, who are 
Vid. page 256.) desired to doe therein accordinge to the will of Mr. Gunsley men- 
tioned in the said paper. a 



(P. 243.) N OS Visitatores Academiae Oxon: et Gustos Beatse Marias Win ton: 
in Oxon: vulgo vocat: New Coll: propter certas et rationabiles 
causas nobis intimatas concedimus Gulielmo Twisse LL:Bac: et 
ejusdem Collegii Socio veniam absentandi se a dicto Collegio ab 
undecimo die Mensis Junii Anno Domini 1649, usque ad un- 
decimum diem Mensis Junii (interpolatis vicibus) qui futurus est 
Anno Domini millessimo sexcent: quinquag: secundo. 

Eidem insuper hanc gratiam facimus, ut pro ea Comuniarum parte 
qua ex Statuto Fundatoris frui debeat (ac si praesens esset) sex 
solidos per manus Bursariorum septimanatim percipiat, caeterisque 
emolumentis (quae reliquis sociis accrescunt) una fruatur: In cujus 

R Mr. Gunsley's bequest was for four scholars of his name and kin, failing which, 
to be elected from the schools of Rochester, Maidstone, &c. Thomas Ashurst, the 
father of Thomas and William Ashurst, is no doubt the member of Parliament, and 
one of the Committee for the reform of the University. He was the son of Alderman 
Henry Ashhurst, of London, a member of the family of the Ashhursts of Ashhnrst, 
in Lancashire, and now of Waterstock, Oxon. See Bliss's edition of the "Life of 
Wood " (Ecclesiastical History Society, 1848), and p. 247. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 239 

rei testimonium nomina nostra et cognomina prsesentibus subscrip* June 6, 1649. 
simus. 

Ed: Keynolds. 
Datum Junii 6 to 1649. Jo: Wilkinson. 

Geo: Marshall Christopher Kogers. 

Gust: Coll: N: Hen: Wilkinson. 

Francis Cheynell. 

This List of Founders-kinsmen, and Winchester Scholars was 
presented to the consideration of the Visitors and Warden of New- 
Colledge accordinge to the desire of Mr. Nathaniell Fines, signified 
upon the eight of December 1648. 



George Danvers 
John Danvers 
Daniell Danvers 



-r, i Fran: Lap. 

v ounders- _. . , TT , . 

, . Christopher Harbin, 

kinsmen. r . 

Thomas Knight. 

Tho: Hanslop. 

Decemb. 8 th 1648. Abel Makepeace. 

. Winchester Scholars superanuated. 

Ordered : That these whose names are underwritten be added to (P. 244.) 
the former Delegacy to enquire what offences have beene comitted Jane 6, ] 649. 
in New Colledge, and by whom, against the Statutes of that Col- 
ledge, or any Ordinance of Parliament which concernes the Visita- 
tion of this Universitie : And make an impartial retourne to the 
Visitors accordingely. 

Mr. Marshall, Warden of New Colledge. 
Mr. Townesend. Mr. Ham. 

Mr. Stevens. S r Morton. 

Mr. Allanson. S r Nest. 

Mr. Hudson. S r Traite. 



240 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 12, 1649. June 12: 1649 . 

(P. 259.) At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon : 

arreares ar * Upon readinge of an Order of the Seventh of June 1649 made 
by the Delegates and Proctors of the Universitie of Oxon, in the 
behalfe of Dr. John Edwards, Doctor of Physicke, and late Naturall 
Phylosophy Reader a in the Universitie of Oxon: wherein they 
signifie an unanimous consent that hee should receave the halfe 
yeare's rent, endinge the Nyne and Twentith of September 1648 : 
which Order of the said Delegates was confirmed by Act of Con- 
vocation June 8, 1649: It is Ordered by this Committee, that the 
' said Doctor Edwards shall receave to his owne use the arrears for 
the said place of Naturall Phylosophy Lecture due the Nyne and 
Twentith of September, 1649. 

(P. 260.) And the Vice Chancellor of Oxon, respectively, in whose hands 
the money is, hereby authorised to pay the same. 

FRAN: Rous. 

Junij 12 th 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 
and Cambridge. 

Ordered : That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe 
represent the whole state of the businesse concerninge the place of 
Physicke Professor in the said Universitie by this day fortnight to 
this Committee. FRAN: Rous. 

Junij 12 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: and 

Cambridge. 

Whereas this Comittee have Ordered, that Mr. Harrington and 
Mr. Bagley, two of the Fellowes of Alsoules Colledge in Oxoa, be 

Edwards (St. John's) was superseded in his office this year hy Joshua Cross, of 
Magdalen. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 241 

removed and deprived from their places in the said Colledge: It June 12, 1649 

is hereby Ordered: That Mr. Thomas Millington and Mr. Peter p- M i 1! j?g e " 
J . . ton and Mr. 

Pett (formerly recommended for Fellowes in the said House by this Pett weere 
Committee) be againe recommended to the Visitors of Oxon and visitors y *- * 
Warden of Alsoules Colledge, respectively, for the aforesaid Fellow- accordinge to 
ships now voyd ; And the Visitors and Warden are desired to j u iy is, 1649. 
establish them therein accordingly." 

FRAN: Kous. 



Junij 12 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: and 

Cambridge. 

Upon the Petition of Mr. John Greaves late Fellow of Merton 
Colledge, and Professor of Astronomy in Oxon, (a coppie whereof 
is annexed): It is Ordered, That the Visitors of the Universitie of (P. 261.) 
Oxon doe consider of the same, and certifie the whole state of the 
case to this Committee by this day fortnight. 

FRAN: Rous. 



June 14th 1649. 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon : (? 249.) 

and Cambridge. 

A Certificate of the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon was read Servants oi 
dated the 29 th of May, wherein they certifie, that Nathaniell Leech, ' 

a These are two of the appointments which do most credit to the Parliamentary 
Visitation. They were original members of the Royal Society. Millington became 
Sedleian Professor of Natnral Philosophy; after the Restoration a knight; eventually 
physician to William III. Pett belonged to an eminent family of hereditary ship- 
builders at Deptford, and was Commissioner for the Navy under the Commonwealth; 
but, a Royalist before the Restoration, was continued in his office, where we find most 
frequent mention of him by Evelyn and Pepys. Sir William Pett's great abilities, 
and unfortunate fate as scapegoat for greater offenders, when the Dutch rode tri- 
umphant in the Thames, are matter of history. 

CAMD. SOC. 2 I 



242 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 14, 1649. Manciple, William Shaw, Stable Groome, John Smith, Porter, and 
Stubbs, Gardner, servants of New Colledge, did not appeare, nor 
give in any Answere to the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon 
before the first of September last. 

Ordered : That the said persons be removed and deprived of their 
places in the aforesaid Colledge and expelled the Universitie. 



June 14 th 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: and 

Cambridge. 

(P. 259.) Ordered by this Committee that it be referred to the Visitors of 

the Universitie of Oxon : to consider of the guift of Sir William 

Sir William Paddy to St. Johns Colledge in Oxon, and how the same may be 

settled on the President of the said Colledge, and report their 

opinions thereof to this Committee.* 

FRAN: Rous. 



[By the Visitors.] 

(P. 249.) Whereas by the Statutes of Exeter Colledge in Oxon the Rector, 

June 22, 1649. an( j o t ner Officers of the said House, are to take severall oathes : 

out oathes * which othes are by divers well affected Members of the House 

clearely discovered to us to be corrupt: Therefore this Committee 

will represent the same to the Committee for Reformation of the 

Universitie of Oxon: And in the meane tyme wee doe approve of 

the admission of the Rector (now to be admitted) * and of the 

Officers (as the exigencies of the Colledge shall require) without 

an oath. 

Jane 22, 1649. Whereas it was this day moved in the behalfe of Mr. Josua 
let Atonies. Sp ri gS e to ke Fellow in Alsoules Colledge in Oxon : Upon the 

a See pp. 247, 248. t John Conant. 



THE VISITOES' REGISTER. 243 

reasons now offered unto us, wee have elected the said Josua June 22, 1649. 
Sprigge to be Fellow in the said Colledge if any place be now 
voyd; if not, then to the next Fellowship which shall happen to 
be voyd, the Warden of the said Colledge givinge his consent 
thereunto. 

Ordered: That [Philip] Stephens shalbe Sub-Warden in New (p. 250.) 

Colledge in Oxon : June 22 th , 

1649. 
Mr. Townsend 



Mr. Stephens 
Mr. Hann 
Mr. North 



Bursars. 



Dec: Fac: Art: 



Mr. Lane J 

Mr. Gunter, Dec: Juris : 

Mr. Huddy, Dec: Theologise : 

Mr. Leech, D: Theol: 

Mr. Alenson, Out-Eider. 

Resolved: That the Order of the 12 th of October 1648 (con- j u i y 41^ 
cerninge debarringe such from votes as did not submitt to the Debarring 
Visitation) doth extend only to the matters of Government and yi ^ m ' 
Reformation of Colledges, and not in respect of lettinge of leases 
or any emoluments or profitts belonginge to their perticuler 
places. 8 

Ordered : That the disposall of the Oxfordshire Fellowshipp in j n ly 4 th , 1649 

Corpus Christi Colledge be respited till further Order of the Visitors: Oxfordshire 

place in CCC: 
Lane. 

a The Order referred to (p. 202) had, not unnaturally, been interpreted to mean more 
than was intended. The retention of so many Non-submitters in the places not 
excepted in that Order was evidently not originally contemplated, and much injus- 
tice must have been done in expelling some, and retaining others ; but when the 
reins were firmly in hand, and the governing bodies could be more or less relied 
upon, Non- submitters were allowed to keep their places, but not their votes or posi- 
tions as teachers or governors. They were not to be turned out, but to remain, if they 
pleased, subordinate to the Submitters. 



244 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 4, 1649. And that cause be shewed (by the President and Fellowes of Corpus 
Christi Colledge) why Mr. Lane's sonne (beinge an Oxfordshire 
man and capable of the place) was not elected into it, accordinge 
to the Statutes of the Colledge. a 

July 4 th , 1649. Ordered : That Edmund Scroope, Batchlor of Arts, be elected into 
a Fellowship in Alsoules Colledge in Oxon, now voyd by death or 
otherwise, by and with the consent of the Warden of the said 
Colledge. 

And that the Vice-Chancellor be desired to write to the Warden 
to obtaine his consent herein. b 

(P. 253.) Ordered : That the Vice-President and Fellowes of Corpus Christi 
Vice-Presi- Colledge shew cause (at the next sittinge of the Visitors) why the 
dent Corp: Batchlors of Arts in the said Colledge should not have the benefite 
of the Lord Generall's Recommendation for takinge of Degrees. 

July 5 th , 1649. Whereas Mr. Townsend and Mr. Allanson, c Fellowes of New 
send anOfr. Colledge, complayned to the Visitors, that they were much injured 
Allaston an( J scandalised by Dr. Vivian, Fellow of the said Colledge, in 
of New Coll: reportinge to the Warden of the said Colledge, that the said Mr. 
Townsend and Mr. Allanson had spoken words of dangerouse con- 
sequence: Vizt: they came to him about Candlemas last past, and 
told him that the Prince and the Scotts were now agreed, advis- 
inge the said Dr. Vivian to goe and joyne with them : Thereupon 
the said Doctor, at the instance of the said Mr. Townsend and Mr. 

* To judge by the numerous Orders which follow relative to Mr. Lane's admission 
to a Corpus Fellowship, and other Orders, the College seems to hare retained a good 
deal of independence in spite of its " reformation." It had been one of the strongest 
Royalist Colleges of all. 

b The Warden of All Souls, perhaps as Cromwell's friend, and a member of Par- 
liament, is treated very differently from the President of Corpus. See Orders before 
and after this. 

c Mr. Allanson was probably the person presented to the Visitors as proctor for 
this year, along with Bew (or Beaw), and rejected by them. Perhaps he had not 
been thought wholly above suspicion, in spite of the acquittal he now receives. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 245 

Allanson, beinge called before the Visitors and required to make Jul 7 5 > 
prooffe hereof, produced noe other evidence therein but his owne 
affirmation, refusinge to undertake to make any further prooff 
thereof: The Visitors beinge well assured of the good affections of 
the said Mr. Allanson and Mr. Townsend to the Parliament, and 
having noe proffe or circumstance offered to them to make that 
report good, doe hereby declare that in their judgment the said 
Mr. Allanson and Mr. Townsend are inocent as to any such pre- 
tended words informed by Dr. Vivian. 

Upon readinge an Order of the Comittee for Reformation of the Jnly ll tb , 
Universitie of Oxon: wherein the Visitors are required to certifie ' 
to the Committee (with all speede,) the whole state of the case Professorship', 
touchinge Dr. Clayton's Physicke Professorship of this Universitie : Tld- paff ' 260 ' 
The Visitors hereupon Order : That the said Dr. Clayton be 
required to give a full accompt to the Visitors touchinge this busi- 
nesse, imediately upon his retourne to Oxon. a 

Whereas an Order of the Committee for Reformation of the ( p< 254f ) 
Universitie of Oxon was read this day before us: whereby the jg^ ' 
Committee recommended Mr. Withers for his readmission into a Mr. Withers 
Fellowshipp in New Colledge : Wee hereupon Order, That the said into New Coll: 
Mr. Withers shall be readmitted in due tyme, and a place in the 
said Colledge shalbe kept voyde for that purpose : 

And it is further Ordered : That Roger Heigham be remembred 
also in due tyme for a Fellowshipp in the said Colledge. 



Whereas Mr. Saver was lately elected Probationer Fellow in f u )y llth ' 

1649. 
Corpus Christi Colledge in Oxon by the Fellowes of the said Col- Mr Sayer of 

ledge : Wee hereby confirme the said election : And also Order : C: C; C: 

a He was knighted after the Restoration. Sir Thomas Clayton succeeded his 
father, Thomas Clayton, Master of Pembroke and Regius Professor of Medicine, in the 
latter capacity, which office he resigned in 1650. He succeeded in the Wardenship 
of Merton Dr. Reynolds, who had been elected in 1660, and resigned in 1661. on 
being preferred to the Bishopric of Norwich. 



246 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



July 11, 1649. That Mr. Lane's sonne shalbe elected Fellow into the next Fellow- 
ship that shall fall voyd in that Colledge without exception. 



July 11 th , 
1649. 

Mr. Grabby. 



(P. 255.) 

Jnly 14 th , 
1649. 

Value of 
Headships. 



July 19 th , 



Upon the humble Petition of Mr. Graby (Chaplain of New Col- 
ledge in Oxon) that his present subsistence might be made a com- 
petent subsistence for him : It is Ordered, That what he now receaves 
in money shall be made up tenn pownds per annum out of the 
revenues of the said Colledge. 

Whereas the Visitors receaved an Order from the Committee for 
Keformation of Oxon to certifie the value of the Headships to the 
end they might be augmented where they are not a competency : 
These are therefore to desire the severall Heads, or their deputies, to 
certifie the Value of their Headships to the Visitors, that soe they 
may send to the Committee, accordinge to the Order, what their 
severall Headships are worth. 

That the severall Heads doe bringe in the value of their places to 
the Vice-Chancellor by 2 of the Clocke on Monday next: That the 
Visitors may consider of the businesse, and make retourne forthwith 
to the Committee above accordinge to the Order : 

1. Universitie Coll. 7. Brazen Nose. 

2. Baliol Coll. 8. Trinity. 

3. Exeter. 9. St. Johns. 

4. Oriell. 10. Jesus. 

5. Queenes. 11. Wadham. 

6. Lincolne. 12. Pembrooke. a 



Upon the Petition of S r Ladyman and S r Burgesse and other 
,. c . Batchlors of Corpus Christi Colledge: Wee Order, That S r Lady- 
man and S r Burgesse shall have their degrees of Masters this 
Tearme, S r Dod and S r Bourne the next Tearme followinge, 
S r Byfeild and S r Gilston soe soone as they have attayned 



a Merton, New, All Souls, Magdalen, Corpus, and Christchurch are omitted, as the 
Headships were sufficiently well endowed. See p. 252. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 247 

the like standinge in the Universitie as S r Dod and S r Bourne July 19, 1649. 
have the next Tearme. 8 

Upon the Petition of Thomas Ashurst in the behalfe of his two (P. 256.) 
sonnes to obtaine the maintainance formerly given by Mr. Gunsley, Jnl >' 19 ' h 
as is at large expressed in the Petition : Wee (upon full hearinge Tllor 
the cause) doe order: That soe soone as wee can dispose of the two Ashurst. 
Scholars chosen into Universitie Colledge, in the roome of those 
who had before right unto it, the allowance shall irnediately goe 
to the Petitioner's two sonnes, accordinge to the said Will. b 

In obedience to an Order of the Committee for Reformation of July 20 th , 
the Universitie of Oxon concerninge Mr. Napper : Wee the Visitors 
certifie that Mr. Napper was removed from his Fellowship in 
Alsoules Colledge because of his non-appearance to our Summons 
accordinge to an Ordinance of Parliament of the 21 th of Aprill 1648. 

Wee were informed that hee was within distance sett downe in 
the Order of the Committee : interpretinge what they ment by dis- 
tance, i: e: within 50 or 60 miles of Oxon. 

-Wee were also informed that hee was in armes and an officer in 
the Kings army, and had not the benefite of Oxford Articles. 

Wee the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, beinge commanded July 20, 1649. 
by an Order sent to us from the Committee for regulatinge the Sir William 
Universitie of Oxon to peruse Sir William Paddie's d will, soe 
farre as it concernes this occation to St. Johns Colledge, Oxon: 

a All these had been placed by the Visitors in Fellowships on Sept. 21 st and Oct. 
26*", 1648. See p. 172. 

b See note to p. 238. 

c This and other passages show that the benefit of the Articles of Surrender was 
confined to those present at the Surrender. 

d Physician to King James I. and President of the College of Physicians. He 
had been one of Laud's chief friends. If the Chapel services were to be suppressed, 
the diversion of the bequest to the Headship, which was a very poor one, and to 
the maintenance of poor scholars, could hardly be complained of. The President, 
Cheynell, was to give College lectures in return for his salary. It was in this year 
that he wrote against the Socinians his vindication of the doctrine of the Trinity. 



248 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 20, 1649. "Wee doe humbly certifie : That Sir William Paddy gave to that 
Colledge 28QQL, which did purchasse 14:01. per annum: which 
1401. hee takes care to be thus distributed by his will: 

1 : Twentie pownds per annum to be paid to an Organist. 

2 : Nynty Six pownds per annum to be paid to eight Singinge 
Men, allowinge them 121. apeece yearely. 

(P. 257.) 3: That 24Z. apeece be paid to 4 Choristers, allowinge each of 
them 61. apeece yearely. 

4 : Wee doe certifie : That he gave his Coppiholds with the 
appurtinances, lyinge neere Woodstocke, and the rents and profitts 
thereof, to the maintaynance of a Lybrary Keeper, in St. Johns 
Colledge : and to noe other end. 

5 : Wee further certifie, That hee did appoynt yearely 20s. for a 
Sermon, and 20s. for Gaudies in the hall of the said Colledge, on 
that day that hee should be buried. 

6 : The Surplusage of the aforesaid Summe hee appoynted that 
it should goe to the repairinge of the organn and for the repaire of 
bookes in the Library. 

7 : Wee doe further Certifie : That the Headshipp of that Col- 
ledge beinge very small, and Mr. Cheynell (the present Governor) 
beinge no way able to support himselfe and family from that Head- 
ship, as it is, by reason of which hee hath testified his purpose to 
leave the Universitie, hee not beinge able to live here for want of 
meanes, and if hee had a competencie hee would live here amonge 
us, which wee assure ourselves would be exceedingly to the benifite 
as of the Colledge so of the Universitie also: 

Wee doe humbly declare, That since Sir William Paddye's 
donation was to such uses in the service of God which are now 
taken away, and not likely to be sett up againe : 

1 : First, it would be much to the honor of God if the President 
were enjoyned to expound the Scripture, or to catechise the youth 
of the Colledge, or the like: That soe the end of Sir William 
Paddies will may be kept up, which was, that the worship and 
service of God might be carried on the better in that House: 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 249 

2: And Secondly, wee doe declare, That it is our judgements, July 20, 1649. 
That for the increase of subsistence of the President (doinge the ( p - 258 -) 
worke required) hee shall receave 100 per annum out of the 
yearely profitts of Sir William Paddye's donation : And for the 
remaynder of the profitts wee thinke fitt that it should goe to the 
maintaynance of some poore Scholars, and for the continuance of 
the yearly Gaudies, and Sermon appoynted by Sir William Paddy : 
20s. beinge allotted to the one, and 20s. to the other. 

Upon readinge Mr. Wirge [his] Petition, wherein hee desires an July 20, 1649 
Order from us for payment of a dividend which he claymeth as 
Fellow of Trinity Colledge : and upon hearinge some Articles 
alledged against him : Wee suspend the determination of any thinge 
as to his Petition, untill a full hearinge of the whole matter. 

At the Committee for Keformation of the Universitie of Oxon: /p 2 65 ) 

July 20. July 20*. 

1649. 

This Committee, takinge into consideration the complaint that Latine to be 
is made by divers learned men of the defect that English Scholars 8 P ken - 
labor under, both in their private and home exercises, and in their 
publique discourses with forraynors by their speakinge English in 
their severall Colledges and Halls in Oxon respectively, doe now 
Order: That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon be required 
to see either the Latin or Greeke be stricktly and constantly 
exercised and spoken, in their familier discourse within the said 
severall Colledges and Halls respectively, and that noe other language 
be spoken by any Fellow, Scholar, or Student whatsoever. And 
the Visitors are required to give notice of this Order to the severall 
Heads of Houses, and be carefull to see this Order executed, and 
performed from tyme to tyme. 

[By the Visitors.] ^ 258.) 

Upon readinge an Order from the Committee for Keform ation of ^^ 2 



the Universitie of Oxon, we hereby require the severall Heads and Latine and 

CAMD. SOC. 2 K Greeke ' 



250 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 20, 1649. Governors of Colledges and Halls in this Universitie of Oxon: That 
they cause either the Greeke, or Latine, to be striktly and constantly 
exercised, and spoken, in their familier discourse, within the said 
severall Colledges and Halls, respectively: And that noe other 
language be spoken, or used, by any Fellow, Scholar, or Student 
whatsoever: and to cause this Order to be executed and performed 
from tyme to tyme. a 

Whereas Doddington Clerke was (by a mistake) outed from his 
Demy's place in Magdalen Colledge in Oxon : Now upon informa- 
tion thereof wee doe hereby restore the said Doddington Clerke to 
his former place in the said Colledge. 



July 21*, 
1649. 

Doddington 
Clerke. 



(P. 269.) 



Noe readmis- 
sion into 
places. 



* vid. pag. 
226. 



(P. 270.) 



July 24 th 1649. 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of 

Oxon: 

Upon readinge the Petition of the Fellowes of New Colledge 
in Oxon, and another Petition entituled The humble Petition 
of the Fellowes of the severall Colledges in the Universitie of 
Oxon, desiringe that accordinge to an Order * of this Committee of 
November 16 th 1648, noe Submission may be accepted which hath 
beene tendred since September the First 1648 : And if any shall now 
pretend their entire affection, and reall submission, they may first 
bringe a Testimony thereof from the Visitors and Jurors of the 
Universitie of Oxon, authorised by Ordinance of Parliament, and 
Commission under the broad scale : It is now resolved by this Com- 
mittee that noe person or persons of the said Universitie of Oxon 
that have beene removed from their places in their respective Col- 
ledges and Halls in the said Universitie for their contempt to the 
Authority of Parliament, accordinge to severall Orders of Parlia- 
ment in that behalfe, shalbe readmitted into any such places. 



a For some remarks on this subject see Introdnction. It is strange that the two 
Orders should bear the same date. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 251 

[College Headships.] JU (J 2 2 61.) 

A true Accompt of the value of those severall Headships in the 
Universitie of Oxon: which stand in neede of augmentation, drawne 
out of the severall Papers given in from the severall Colledges : 
Universitie Colledge for dyett and sty- s. d. 
pend . . . 30 

Fines, dividends, and chambers are soe 
short, and uncertaine, that they cannot 
be stated. 

Baliol Colledge . ; . 33 6 5 

OriallColl: . . . . 40 

Queenes Coll: . - . . 70 

Exeter Coll: . . . . 45 

Lincolne Coll: . . , 90 

Brasen Nose Coll: . . "..' 60 

John Baptist Coll: . . 60 

Trinity Coll: for dyett and stypend in 

money . . . 25 

There is a parsonage annexed unto it 
worth in quiett tymes 2QOI. per 
annum : but now, through the troubles 
of the tymes and troublesomenesse 
of the people, it is represented by the 
President as much more uncomfort- 
able then beneficial. 

Jesus Coll: . ' . . ., 40 

Pembrooke . . . 30 

All other accidentall perquisites are very 

small, and uncertaine. 

Wadham Coll: . . . 100 

There are also seven Halls which have noe endowment at all, (P. 262.) 
but the disposal of chambers, which was at best very small, as is 
affirmed, and now scarse any thinge. a 

a The value of the Headships given in the Tanner MSS. vol. 338, p. 237, con- 
firms the Return made by the Colleges on this occasion, on the point of the difference 



252 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 26, 1649. Articles exhibited against Mr. John Greaves of Merton Colledge 

in Oxon: 

Seepag;l38: j. First it is objected: That Mr. John Greaves informed some 
one or more of the King's Agents in Oxon, that the money in 



Greaves upon Merton Colledge Treasury did belonge to the Kinge, and that 
his seeking to . . . . 

be restored. the Kinge might challenge it as his right. 

2. Upon this information given Dr. Cha worth one of the King's 
Agents, came to Mr. French, the Senior Fellow of the Colledge 
aforesaid, and tould him, that Mr. Greaves encouraged him to 
demaund the money, which was in the Colledge treasury for the 
King's use. 

3. Mr. French made his addresses to the Kinge, and assured him 
that the money did not of right belonge to his Majestic: and 
the said Mr. French tould Mr. Greaves, that they were in danger 
to be questioned by the Parliament for givinge up the money; 
where upon Mr. Greaves tould him the said Mr. French that then 
they might retourne this Answere to the Parliament: That the 
Kinge had right to the money by the Statutes of the Colledge, 
and that the Kinge, beinge on the place, came and challenged his 
right. 

4 That upon this information, one came from Mr. Ashburne- 

ham, to fetch the money out of the Colledge Treasury: and that 

gentleman, with Mr. Willowby, carried away with them 400/. of 

the Colledge money: which money the said Mr. Greaves was 

(P. 263.) sworne to preserve for the Colledge use. 

5. The said Mr. Greaves did contrary to his oath convey away 
a very considerable part of the College goods, without the con- 
between the six excepted Colleges and the remainder. The income of the latter 
Headships had risen considerably by the end of the century (when the Table appears 
to have been made), with the exception of those of Lincoln and Wadham, the income 
of which had fallen, and of Queen's, which stands at the same figure. The Parson- 
age attached to the Headship of Trinity is Garsington. For the Halls, see below. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 253 

sent of the Company, and gratified courtiers with them, in other July 26, 1649. 
Howses, and a great part of those goods are imbeezelled, and lost, 
and those that are retourned are much abused, and not fitt for the 
Colledge service. 

6. The said Mr. Graves feasted the Queene's Confessors, sent 
divers presents to them, and amongst the rest an holy thorne, an 
excellent instrument of idolatrie or superstition at least; And the 
said Mr. Graves was observed to be more familier with these Con- 
fessors then any true Protestants used to be. 

7. The said Mr. Graves drew up a Petition with his owne hand, 
and inveigled some unwary younge men to subscribe it: Upon 
the presentinge of which Petition Sir Nathaniell Brent was ejected 
from beinge Warden of Merton Colledge, and Doctor Harvey a 
chosen in his place. 

8. The said Mr. Graves did take an advantage against Mr. 
Corbett, and Mr. Button, Fellowes of Merton Colledge, because 
they were in the Parliament's Quarters, whereupon they were both 
turned out of their respective offices in the Colledge, their Chambers 
disposed of to others, and divers of their books and goods im- 
bezelled. 

9. Divers yonge schollars were very much prejudiced by the 
said Mr. Greaves, because hee forbad those that had the charge of 
their goods to take any further care of them, but commaunded 
them to give up the keyes to him, and would not suffer the faithfull 
servants of the Colledge to take any inventory of them, and soe the 
goods were plundered or spoyled. b 

The discoverer of the circulation of the blood. He was put into the Warden- 
ship of Merton by the influence of Charles I. and retained it for a year. 

b Mr. Greaves' offences, supposing them to be proved, must have appeared heinous 
enough, especially his dallying with the Queen's confessors ; but his abstraction of 
the College money might be placed in & very different light ; (see W. of All Souls, 
chap. x). The receipts of Dr. Chaworth, Charles's agent in these matters, are still to 
be found in most College archives. They were retained under a hope, never 
realized, that they might avail to redeem the pledge under which the money and 
plate were borrowed. The young King enjoyed his own again ; not so the Colleges. 



254 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



July 26, 1649, 

(P. 264.) 

July 26th, 

1649. 



July 26: 



July 29th, 

1649. 
(P. 265.) 

Oriell Coll. 
vid. p: 227. 
Mr. Farrell. 



July 29th, 
1649. 

Sir Byfeild 
and Sir 
Gilson. 



Ordered: That the Vice-President of Magdalen Colledge in 
Oxon be desired to retourne all the Orders made by us since July 
20th, 1649, unto the honorable Committee for Eeformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon. 

Ordered: That S r Dod and S r Bourne, Batchellors of Corpus 
Christi Colledge, shall take their Degrees of Masters this Tearme : 
doinge their exercise. 

Ordered: That all arrears due unto Oriell Colledge till Michael' 
mass last, and are either receaved or to be receaved, shall be sett 
apart for paying the antient debts of that Colledge. 

Ordered : That Mr. Farrin of Oriell Colledge, for divers reasons 
shall be removed from his Vicaredg of St. Marie's, and be disin- 
abled from reading as Tutor unto Schollers in Oriell Colledge till 
further order. 

Ordered: That S r Byfeild and S r Gilson, Batchlors of Corpus 
Christi Colledge, shall take their degrees of Masters when they 
come to be of the same standinge as S r Dod and S r Bourne were 
when they tooke their degrees of Masters. 



(P. 266.) Whereas after diligent inquiry made, wee could not finde fitt 

July 29, 1649. p ersons borne in Statutable Counties to succeede such as are ejected 

Coll.rp. f rom the severall Colledges in this Universitie by authority of 

Parliament: Wee are necessitated to referre all whom wee have 

elected unto certaine classes, that they may be regulated by 

the Statutes of their several houses, as if they were borne in those 

Counties to which they are upon mature deliberation designed. 

The President and Fellowes of Corpus Christi Colledge in Oxon 
havinge presented this list underwritten to us the Visitors of this 
Universitie: Wee humbly recommend it to the consideration of 
this honourable Committee: That the Fellowes and Scholars 
elected into that Colledge may enjoy all profitts and priviledges of 
the places into which they are elected, and be regulated by the 
Statutes of that Colledge, unto all intents and purposes, as if they 
had beene borne in those Counties unto which they are by the 
Colledge aforesaid (pro hac vice) designed. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 255 

And that the Statutes of that and all other Colledges for July 29, 1649. 
electinge fitt persons out of the severall Counties named in the 
Statutes of everie Colledge respectively, may be punctually observed 
in all Colledges that are already settled, and in all other Colledges, 
as soone as they shalbe settled. 81 

Provided, that this Order shall not be prejuditiall to S r Lane 
of Corpus Christi Colledge, because there hath beene a former 
graunt made to him of the next Fellowship that falls voyd in that 
Colledge. 

[The above Order refers to the following Reports from 
Corpus Christi Colledge.] 

June 14th, 1649. 

Corpus Christi Colledge Oxon : Att a raeetinge of the President C: C= C: 
and Seniors it was thought fitt and agreed upon That the Fellowes 
and Scholars of the said Colledge should be designed and reputed 
to be of such severall Counties respectively as are herein expressed ; 
and that to all intents and purposes mentioned in the Statutes of 
the said Colledge as if they had beene borne in the Counties 
whereof they are now reputed : 



Fellowes. Scolars. 



Hampshire 



Surrey 



Mr. Abbott, Reputed 
M. Stephens, Reputed 
Mr. Ford, Rep: 
D 8 . Byfeild 
Mr. Prouse, Rep. 



Durrani Mr. Tidcombe, Rep. 



Somerset 



Mr. Milward 
Mr. Parsons 



By field, Reputed. 
Disney, Rep. 
Walthus, Rep. 
Rayner. 
Ford. 

Parrs. 
Gardiner. 



a The anxiety expressed by the Visitors that this breach of Statutes should be 
strictly exceptional, is worthy of notice. 



256 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Devonshire 



Lincolneshire 



Gloucestershire 



Kent 

Lankashire 

Bedfordshire 

Oxfordshire 



June 14, 1649. Fellowes. 

\ Mr. Whitehorne 
| D 8 . Bogan 

( Mr. Roe, Rep. 

( D 8 . Ladyman, Rep. 

D 8 . Burgesse, Rep. 

D 8 . Dod, Rep. 

Dr. Hide 

Mr. Sparks 

D s . Billingsley 

D 8 . Bourne, Rep. 

D 8 . Sayer, Rep 

D 8 . Gilson, Rep. 

This wee humbly submit to the determination of the honorable 
the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Edmund Staunton, President. Tho: Whitehorne. 

Jo: Milward, Vice President. Ti: Stephens. 

Ri: Abbott. Jo: Ford. 



Scolars. 

Thorneton, Rep. 
Anderson, Rep. 
Nelson. 
Wanricke. 
Ballard. 
Lisley, Rep. 
Webb. 
Way, Rep. 
Whetham, Rep. 
Johnson. 
D 8 . Asher, Rep. 
Lane. 



Aug. 2. 
(P. 265.) 



(P. 268.) 



Ordered that a vijs et modis be sent for Mr. Melford of Edmund 
jj a ii ^0 make his personall appearance upon Monday the 6 of Aug. 
on Monday twixt nine and eleven in the forenoon at the Deane's 
lodgings in Christ Church Colledge before the Visitors. 



Ordered : That Mr. Lomax, Fellow of Oriell Colledge in Oxon, 
o keinge to be imployed in the State's service, shall have all manner 

of Oriell ColL of allowances due unto him as Fellow of the said Colledge for a 
Twelvemonth next ensuinge the date hereof, savinge the losse of 
his Commons for the tyme aforesaid. 

Upon due consideration of the statute and condition of John 
Paris and Baptist Colledge it is hereby Ordered that S r Paris and S r Holt, 
Holt of Jo; Batchelors, Fellowes of the Colledge aforesaid , shall be admitted into 

xJ&pt. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 257 

the number of the term Seniors there to be assistant to the Pre- A "g- 2, lfi49. 
sident of the said Colledge in matters of concernment according to 
the Statutes of the house aforesaid, and partake of all preveledges 
and profitts respectively. 

Ordered : That Mr. Farrer, Fellow of Oriel Colledge, bring in Aug. 6, 1649. 
those reasons which he referrs to in his Petition against the next 
sitting of the Visitors. 

Resolved : That the lettinge and sealinge of all such leases which Aug. 6, 1C49. 
belonge unto Merton Colledge be put off till the 6th November 
next. 

Resolved : That all the officers belonginge unto Merton Colledge Eesolves 
be continued in the said offices till the 6th November next. jjjj 1 * Merton 

Resolved : That the Probationer Fellowes of Merton Colledge be 
made compleat Fellowes of the said Colledge the sixt of November 
next. 

Resolved: That there be an Election by the Visitors of five 
Probationer Fellowes in Merton Colledge, to tindergoe all excercises 
and a full yeare of Probation in the said Colledge. a 

Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Reynolds, Vice Chancellor. 

S r Nath: Brent. Dr. Jo: Wilkinson. 

Dr. Corbit. Dr. Harris. 

Dr. Rogers. Dr. Cheynell. 

Governor Kelsey. Mr. Appletree. 

Mr. Draper. 

ft The direct interference of the Visitors with everything concerning Merton (see 
also below), the Warden himself signing as one of them, requires explanation, 
when it is remembered that no College except Lincoln had been more distinctly 
Parliamentarian, and that along with Exeter, Christchurch, Trinity, and Wadham, 
it had already been allowed to act independently. Perhaps the Warden, who was 
an old man, had no longer much influence in the College, which, as we have seen, 
still retained some strong Royalists among its members. Not long after this we 
find him at issue with his colleagues. Perhaps his estrangement from them was not 
unconnected with Collegiate sentiments which had hitherto been suppressed. 
CAMD. SOC 2 L 



258 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Aug. Gth, 1649. The Names of such as are to be examined as Candidates for 
(P. 269.) Fellowshipps in Merton Colledge. 

1. S r Pavier. 6. S r Sedgwick. 11. Bradee. 

2. S r Edcs. 7. S r Hully. 12. S r Hirst. 

3. * * * 8. S r King. 13. * * * 

4. S r Petty. 9. S r Ford. 14. Larkham. 

5. S r Hitchcocke. 10. S r Crips. 15. Long. 

These are to be examined upon the One and Twentieth of this 
instant August, by six of the Delegates (in the presence 
of the Visitors), vizt. : 

1. Warden Wilkins. 4. Dr. Greenwood. 

2. Mr. Button. 5. Mr. Owen. 

3. Mr. Cornish. 6. Mr. Cross. 

:* 

Aug. 7, 1649. Ordered: That Mr. Farren, Master of Arts and Fellow of Oriell 
Mr. Farren. Colledge, be indulged to proceede to reade as Tutor unto his scholars 
in the said Colledge, until further Order of the Visitors : 

Aug. 7, 1649. That the Petition of Robert Norton, of Universitie Colledge, be 
University 1 ' taken into consideration the 15 th of this instant August: And that 
Coll: the Fellowes of the said Colledge be desired to be then present 

before the Visitors concerninge the contents of the said Petition : 

Aug. 8, 1649. Eesolved: That Mr. Leister, of Brazen Nose Colledge, in Oxon, 

(P. 270.) hath beene adjudged Homicida, and (accordinge to the Statute of 

the said Colledge in that case) is scandalouse : It is hereupon 

Ordered: Thai the said Statute be executed (to his expulsion) 

accordingly. 



THE VISITORS 5 REGISTER. 259 

Aug: 8, 1649. 

Ordered : That all and everie Governor of Colledges and Halls be Aug- 
hereby required and strictly enjoyncd to governe accordinge to the Government 
auncient Statutes of their severall Houses respectively : And all and statutes 5 t0 
everie Scholar, Fellow, Officer, and Member of the said Houses, 
are likewise required to submitt to their Governors accordinge to Vid: pag- 236. 
Statute, upon the penalties mentioned in their severall Statutes, 
except in such spetiall cases of Statute where the law of God or the 
land doth require the contrary. And if any controversie shall arise 
concerninge any Statute or any clause of a statute, that spetiall case 
is to be presented to the Visitors untill the Statutes of everie House 
can be received, reformed, and setled. Moreover, because wee are 
informed that there are noe Statutes to be found in some Colledges, 
yet there are some lawdable decrees made, and everie Society have 
power to make just and" reasonable decrees to bynd all members of 
that Society, all Heads and members of such Houses are required to 
observe such decrees, and if there happen to be any difference about 
any such decrees the Visitors are to decide the controversie till 
further Order." 

Resolved: That the Delegates doe represent a certaine number of (P. 271.) 
candidates to the Visitors upon the last Monday of September next, Au &- 13 ' 
and that any of the Visitors doe likewise represent whom they please 
at the same tyme, out of which (soe represented and first examined) 

a Wood remarks of this Order that it was given because " from the time of the 
Visitation to this all things were in a confusion, and every one did what he thought 
fit." But it should he observed that it is, substantially, only a repetition of the 
Order issued five months previously (March 8, 164f ), and which we have no reason 
to think was disobeyed to such an extent as Wood suggests. It is somewhat fuller 
than the earlier Order, and contains a reference to a contemplated revision of 
the Statutes of all Colleges, in place of the former vague notice that cases might 
occur where the Visitors might think seme change desirable. It must have been 
painful to such older members of Colleges as remained to be informed that their 
Statutes contained anything " contrary to the law of God," whatever might be the 
case as to the new-made " laws of the land." 



260 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Aug. 13, 1649. slialbe made an election of Fellowes for Merton Colledge the Monday 
next followinge. 

Kesolved : That the last Monday save one in Sept: next be sett 
apart for prosecution of the Charge exhibited against the Fellowes 
of Merton Colledge. 

Aug. 13, 1649. Ordered : That 

1. Dr. Staunton, Corpus Christi Colledge. 

2. Dr. Greenewood, Brazen Kose. 

3. Mr. Wilkins, Wadham Colledge. 

4. Mr. Milward, Corpus Christi. 

5. Mr. Stephens, Sub- Warden, New Colledge. 

6. Mr. Ford, Christ Church. 

7. Mr. Phillipps, Queenes Colledge. 

8. Mr. Longe, Oriell Colledge. 

9. Mr. Seirl, Exeter Colledge. 

10. Mr. Conant, a Exeter Colledge. 

11. Mr. Tonge, Universitie Colledge. 

12. Mr. Johnson, Alsoules. 

13. Mr. Upton, Alsoules. 

14. Mr. Roberts, Jesus Colledge. 

15. Mr. Ford, Corpus Christi. 

16. Mr. Jersey, Pembrooke. 

17. Mr. Easton, Oriell Colledge, 

shall be desired to be assistant to the number of Delegates formerly 
chosen by the Visitors. 

(P. 272.) Whereas upon the Petition of Thomas Ashurst, and by the will 

Aug. 23, 1649. of Mr. Gunsley, it appeares to us that one of the sonnes of Thomas 

Thomas Ashurst hath right to the profitts of a Scholar's place in Universitie 

Sonnes. Colledge, into which S r Mote was lately put: We therefore now 

remove the said S r Mote into a Fellowship now voyd in the said 

Colledge: And further Order: That Thomas Ashurst his sonne 

a The first mention of the new Rector of Exeter. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 261 

shall henceforth receave the profitts of the place, accordinge to the Aug. 23, 1649. 
will of Mr. Gunsley. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon : (P. 275.) 

Resolved : That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon be 16 g'_ ' 
required to give an accompt to this Committee what progresse they 
have made in the Visitation of that Universitie, both to persons and 
things, and that the Paper presented to this Committee, entitled a 
Model!,* to the end that the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon 
may be perfected and compleated, be referred to their consideration 
in the Visitation of the said Universitie accordinge to Reformation. 

FRAN: ROUSE. 

[By the Visitors.] 
Upon the Petition of Mr. Graby, Chaplaine of New Colledge: It (P. 272.) 

is Ordered that his case be referred to the Warden and 13 Senior Septemb. 4 th , 

1649. 
Fellowes of the House to settle upon him, and assure him of, the M ~ , 

summe of tenne pownds per annum in what way they shall thinke 
fitt: 

Resolved: That the businesse of Merton Colledge, formerly ap- sept. 4 th , 1649. 
poynted for Monday, the 17 th of this month, be deferred till Tuesday, 
the morrow after. And that then any other day or daies shalbe 
prefix't for a full settlement of that Colledge. 

Resolved : That Mr. Crake and Mr. Jones shalbe admitted Fel- Sept. 4 th , 1649. 
lowes of New Colledge by the Warden, accordinge to the rules of Mr. Crake and 
the House, and the businesse dependinge before us concerninge r ' 
them to remayne statu quo untill further Order. 

Ordered : That none that are or shall be chosen into any Col- Sept. 18, 1649. 
ledges shall be admitted before they have beene examined by the (P- 275-) 
Delegates. 1 ' 

a See p. 264. 

b A preparation for the system, which did not become at all general till 1653, of 
election by Colleges amongst persons previously examined on certain points by 
Delegates appointed by the Visitors. 



262 THE VISITORS' EEGISTER. 

Sept. 18 th , Ordered : That the Charg exhibited against Mr. Sayer, Fellow of 

(P 272") Morton Colledge, so farr as it is not proved against him, shall be 
Mr. Sayer reserved for further prosecution. 

Merton. 

Sept. 18 th , Ordered: That Mr. French, Mr. Brent, Mr. Sayer, and Mr. 

Lydall, Fellowes of Merton Colledge, whoe have confessed to drink 

Merton! a health upon the 6 of Nov: last in their Colledge Hall, a shall all be 

put a week out of commons in the said Colledge, and that Sir 

(P. 273.) Kath: Brent, Warden, be desired to give them all a publique 

admonition for the same. 

Sept.is th ,i649. Ordered: That the examination of candidates for Fellowships in 
Merton Colledge be put off till the 3 d of October next, and that after 
the said examination [they] shall proceed to an election of Fellowes 
in the said Colledge. 

Sept. 18 lh ,l649. The Visitors, takeing into consideration the great dishonor of this 
Vid: p. 227. Universitie of Oxon in want of Bedell staves, doe Order that every 
Bedle Stares. Colledg be desired to lend what sum of monies they shall think fitt 

to the purchasing thereof, and that such summes of money be ready 

against the begining of the next tearm. 

Sept. 18, 1649. Ordered: That Mr. Vice-Chancellor be desired to set up his 
Court in this Universitie of Oxon upon the beginning of the next 
Tearm, and to sit every Fryday as formerly hath been accustomed, 
or shall be thought fitt and expedient. 11 

a " They, according to the manner, with a Tertiavit, drank the King's health 
standing bare." (Annals.) The severest measures might have been justified at 
this period, for there were already elements enough of disturbance, the peace of the 
University having been in this month seriously endangered by a mutiny amongst 
the garrison, which Lambert and Ingoldsby were publicly thanked by the University 
for quelling. They were voted a present of gloves, and " a civil visit of thankful- 
ness." On Sept. 11, a committee of the University had been appointed to confer 
with the city as to the expediency of dismantling the place and getting rid of the 
garrison. Keg. Conv. T. 

b A strong sign of the resumption of academical order. Wood says, " It was not 
done to the purpose till 1650," in fact, not till Greenwood became Vice-Chancellor. 



THE VISITORS* REGISTER. 263 

11 Whereas by an Order of the Committee for Reformation of the Sept. 18, 1649. 
Universitie of Oxofi wee are required to give an accompt to them Progresse in 
what progresse we have made in the Visitation of this Universitie, 
both as to persons and things: It is hereupon Ordered: That an 
accompt be drawen up of the substance of our proceedings hitherto 
in the Visitation of this Universitie, b and transmitted to the said 
Comittee accordingly. 

Ordered : That Mr. Barsnett be elected Fellow into a voyd Fel- Sept. 18, 1649. 
lowship in Alsoules Colledge in Oxon accordinge to the desire of 
the Warden of the said Colledge . 

Ordered: That Mr. Appletree's sonne (Demy of Magdalen 
Colledge) be voted to a dead Fellowship in Alsoules Colledge 
in Oxon, by consent of the Warden. 

Ordered : That Mr. Boules be chosen into a Fellowship in Al- Sept. 18, 1649. 
soules Colledge, in the 3 d place by consent of the Warden : 

Ordered : That upon the first vacancy of a Fellowship in New (P. 274.) 
Colledge Mr. Heigham be restored, and that Mr. Salloway be voted Sept. 18, 1649. 
into the next vacant place after, in that Colledge in the Visitors 
disposall, by consent of the Warden. 

Resolved: That two Fellowships in Brazen Nose Colledge be Sept. 18, 1649. 
kept voyd for a tyme, untill the debts of tlte Colledge be neere Brasen Coll: 
satisfied. 

Ordered : That Lodoweeke Mason and Robert Bostocke have Sept. 18, 1649. 
libertie to enter their names to study in any Colledge or Hall in 
this Universitie. 

n This Order refers to the preceding Order of the London Committee of Aug. 30 th . 
See p. 261. 

b This would he interesting if it could he recovered. 
Or death vacancy. 



264 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. 18, 1649. [Copy of] A Modell. a 

A Modell. To the end that the Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon be 

perfected and compleated: May it be Ordered by the Committee: 
1. That all ill affected and scandalouse persons, wheather of the old 
or new plantation, be removed. 2. Because Statutes as well as 
persons are a grand subject of Reformation : That the Fellowes of 
all Colledges who came in by a Parliamentary power be appoynted 
to consult with their Head for removeinge such Statutes and Con- 
stitutions as are either impiouse, superstitiouse, or inconvenient, and 
substitute such as may promote pietie and good learninge. Be it 
likewise Ordered: That the Delegates doe the like by their Statutes, 
and then present them to the Visitors to be confirmed by them. 
Thirdly : That the motion of the Lord Generall to the Parliament 
concerninge an expositorie lecture to be continued by Doctor Rey- 
nolds, Mr. Cavill, Mr. Thomas Goodwyn, may be put in speedy 
execution. 4 1 ?. Lest men should degenerate and make the meanes 
their end, and through retirement become droanes: May it be 
Ordered: That noe man enjoy his Fellowship beyond Doctors 
standinge, or one yere after his Commencement, unlesse they be such 
as are Professors or Public Lecturers, and may doe more eminent 
service in the Universitie then els where. 

Vera Copia: NEEDLER. 

(K 277.) Sep: 27, 1649. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the University of Oxon: 

Upon due consideration had by this Committee touchinge the 
Reformation of Merton Colledge in the Universitie of Oxon : It is 

* By whom had this " Model " been sent to the London Committee for their con- 
sideration, previously to August 30? Was it by Fairfax and Cromwell? For some 
remarks on it, see Introduction. On Sept. 27, the University, upon the Order of 
the London Committee, ordered its delegates to report on the University Statutes, 
and the Heads of Colleges on theirs. Reg. Conv. T. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 265 

Ordered : That the election of the said Colledge be respited till Sept. 27, 1649. 
Monday next come six weeks, beinge the Twelvth day of November, 
and hereof the Head and Fellowes of the said Colledge are to take 
notice. FRA: Rous. 



Sep: 27, 1649. 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 

Ordered: That Mr. Howell, of Exeter Colledge; Mr. Basnett, of 
St. Johns; Mr. Nichols, of Merton Colledge; Mr. De la Place, S r 
Hully, of Universitie Colledge ; S r Pavier, of New Inne, S r 

Hitchcocke, of New Colledge; Lee, of Magdalen Hall, S r 

Sterry, of Cambridge; and S r Butler, of Cambridge, be recom- 
mended to the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon for Fellowships 
in Merton Colledge, in the said Universitie, when any shall be voyd, 
or els where. FRAN: Rous. 



Whereas upon complaint made unto us the Visitors of this Octob.3 a ,1649. 
Universitie, that S r Bogan and S r Parsons were like to be pre- ( p - 275 
judiced by the admission of their juniors, to be actual Fellowes of 
Corpus Christi College, in Oxon: It was upon the 2 d Nov. last 
past Ordered : That S r Bogan and S r Parsons aforesaid should Sir Bogan and 
actually and presently enjoy all and singuler the profitts and privi- 
leges of Fellowes in the Colledge aforesaid accordinge to their 
senioritie : and yet S r Bogan hath not beene admitted Fellow of 
the said Colledge, though the 2 yeares of Probation (which hee is 
accordinge to the Statutes of the Colledge to undergoe) are fully 
expired : These are to require the President and Fellowes of the 
said Colledge aforesaid to admitt the S r Bogan to be actual Fellow 
of Corpus Christi Colledge, and to allow him the full profitts of a 
compleat Fellow accordinge to his senioritie, from the date of our 
former Order : 

CAMD. SOC. 2 M 



266 THE VISITOKS' REGISTER. 

Oct. 6, 1649. Octob: 6, 1649. 

Ordered: That the commons of everie Colledge in this Uni- 
vei 'sitie of Oxon shall duly be carried up into the hall of the 



b h c S Tied into - Colledge at dinner and supper from tyme to tyme, and that noe 
Student, Fellow, or Scholar in this Universitie shall be permitted 
to take his commons in his chamber at any tyme, except in case of 
sicknesse or takinge of physicke, upon which occations only they 
are permitted to take their commons in their chambers ; whereof the 
Head of everie Colledge is desired to take notice, and to cause the 
same to be observed accordingly.* And also that all Students, 
Fellowes, and Scholars doe observe stricktly the former Order for 
speakinge of Latin os Greeke from tyme to tyme within the severall 
Colledges and Halls in this Universitie. b 

Oct. 6 th , 1649. Upon the Petition of the officers attendinge the Visitors, that 
Visitors' offi- they might receave some satisfaction for their longe continued 
Math: Lecture, paynes taken in this present Visitation, accordinge to a former 
graunt and Order from the Committee for Keformation of the 
Universitie of Oxon: (and also of a former Order of the Visitors), it 
is thereupon this day Ordered, that the Convocation be moved to 
give their consent and approbation that such arreares as are now 
due upon the Mathematique Lecture c (since the vacancie of the 
said lecture) be sett apart for the payment and satisfaction of the 
said officers; and that the Convocation be also moved to graunt 
that a letter of Attorney be given to such person or persons as the 

8 This abuse was always cropping up even in ordinary times, as the Injunctions 
and Visitations of Colleges show. When the hour of dinner gradually grew later 
and later, that one meal only instead of two had to be taken in Hall. No common 
meals beyond dinner and supper (somewhat corresponding to our lunch and dinner), 
were provided for by Statutes or custom; breakfast, until modern times, being taken 
very early, and scarcely reckoned a meal at all. 

b This is the second Order by Visitors on the subject of speaking Latin or Greek. 

c These revenues had already been set apart in March for the benefit of the 
Registrar. His payment was, soon after this, provided for by Convocation out of 
the fees of " Proceeders " and fees for Dispensations and " Commutations of 
Exercises." (Reg. Conv. T. p. 82.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 267 

said officers shall nominate, for receavinge the said arreares now due Oct. 6, 1649 
as aforesaid. 

Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Reynolds, Vice-Chancellor. Dr. Corbitt. 

S r Nath: Brent. Dr. Mylles. 

Dr. Wilkinson, Sen. 

Upon the Petition of the Hector and Fellowes of Exeter Colledge (P- 279.) 
in Oxon against the advancement of S r Fiatt to be one of the five pf 
seniors of that Colledge, contrary to an Order made by the Visitors Coll:' 
upon mature deliberation on the 19 th Jan: 1648, for composinge of 
sad differences and preventinge of dangerouse abuses in the Uni- 
versitie, wee doe hereby declare that the alteration of our Order 
would be destructive to the government of perticuler Societies, and 
the violation thereof would foment animosities in discontented 
youthes and disturb the publique peace of the whole Universitie, 
and therefore wee see just cause to ratifie and confirme our former 
Order; yet because there is an Order made in S r Fiatt's case 
by vertue of a refference from the honorable Committee for the 
reforminge and regulatinge of the Universitie : it is Ordered : That 
the Petition of the Rector and Fellowes of Exeter Colledge, our 
Order of the 19 th Jan: 1648, and all Orders, referrences, and papers 
which concerne Sir Fiatt's case be forthwith transmitted to the 
honorable Committee aforesaid, to determyne the case as they in 
their wisdome shall thinke meete. 

Ordered : That it be referred to the delegates to consider how Octob. 13 th , 
Mr. Greaves may have a fitt compensation out of the arreares of the ^Graves 
Astronomy Lecture, accordinge to the Order of the honourable Astronomy 
Committee hereunto annexed ; and likewise to consider how Dr. 
Turner a may have some considerable summe of money for his 
support; and finally, how all accompts betweene the said Dr. Turner 
and Mr. Greaves may be ballenced and stated accordinge to equitie, 
that all differences betweene them may be happily composed. 

a The Scdleian Professor of Geometry. 



268 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

(P. 280.) Ordered : That whereas it appeareth to us that Oriall Colledge is 
Oct. 13*1649. indexed to Mr. Kouse (librarie keeper to the Universitie of Oxon) 

Mr. Kous, . . . , , . 

Oriel Col: in the summe of threescore and tenne pounds: it is Ordered that his 
said debt shall be paid out of the two vacant Fellowships in the 
said Colledge, or otherwise as the Colledge shall thinke fitt. 
Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. Dr. Rogers. 

Dr. Wilkinson, Sen. Dr. Mills. 

Dr. Harris. Dr. Cheynell. 

(P. 281.) Upon readinge the certificate and Order of the honorable Com- 
Oct. 19, 1649. m ittee for Westminster Schoole (and upon due consideration thereof) 
in the behalfe of Jolin Busb J Philli P Henry,* John Vincent, 



minster George Ansley, Edward Bagshaw, George Hind, Thomas Cole, and 

Schollers. o i i * TIT C.L i 4L 

James Cowes, Scholars chosen out of Westminster bchole, the 

Visitors thinke fitt and Order, that the former yere in which they 
were detayned at schoole (through the exigence of warre) shall be 
allowed them, both as to their senioritie in the House into which 
they were chosen and as to their preferments and takinge of their 
degrees in the Universitie, and that they foure first nominated shall 
reckon for their tyme as if they had actually beene chosen May 1, 
Anno Domini 1 646, and the other as if they had beene chosen 
May 1, 1645. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the University of Oxon. 

October 18 th , 1649. 

(P. 291.) Ordered: That the Votes of the House of the 11 th of October 
inclusive be sent downe to the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon : 
and that they take care that the same be put in execution according 
to the directions of the House; and that they certifie both such as 
subscribe and such as doe not ; and that they give summons to 
those that are absent to subscribe the same, according to the tyme 
lymited in the said Votes. 

FRAN: Rous. 

a See p. 72. 



THE VISITOKS' REGISTER. 269 

[By the Visitors.] Oct. 19*1649. 

Upon due consideration of the debts of Universitie Colledge in Ooii : 
Oxon: it is ordered, that three Fellowshipps shall be left voyd for 3 fell: v y d - 
the payment thereof, and that the full profitts of them be paid by 
the Bursars to that end; unlesse cause be shew'd by the Fellowes of 
the Colledge at our next sittinge why this Order should not stand. 

Upon due consideration of the many inconveniences that ensue Octob. 19 th , 
by thn sittinge of the Visitors unto unseasonable houres at their 
afteernoone meetings, it is resolved, that noe businesse shall detaine _,, ' . . 

them longer then 6 of the clocke, except upon extraordinary and sitttillGoclock 

at night, 
urgent cause. 

Present of the Visitors : 

Mr. Vice-Chancellor. Dr. Cheynell. 

Dr. Wilkinson, Sen. Dr. Mills. 

Dr. Harris. 

Memorand : That William Tunstall be taken into consideration, (P- 282.) 
and be with the first disposed of to a place in the Universitie. ?,, c * ob> 22th > 

1649. 

Upon due consideration of the Petition of Mr. Wirge, Fellow of Memorand: 
Trinitie Colledge, wee finde hee hath right to his divident as a Oct. 22 th 1649. 
Fellow of the said Colledge. Wee hereby Order: That the Bursar Wirge, 
of the said Colledge forthwith pay unto the said Mr. Wirge his Trinitie Coll: 
part and divident due unto him accordingly. 

It is also Resolved : That Mr. Lydall, Fellow of the said Colledge, Lydall, 
be allowed to moderate in the Phylosophy Lecture in the roome Trinitie Coll: 
and absence of Mr. Wirge. 

Upon consideration of Thomas Ashurst's Petition, and the will Oct. 22 th , 1649. 
of Mr. Gunsley, concerninge an Exhibition in University Colledge, Ashnrst, 
It is Ordered: That Thomas Ashurst, sonne of the said Petitioner, Coll: 
shall be admitted into a Scholar's place of Mr. Gunsley's Foundation 

now voyd in the said Colledge. And upon complaint against 

Doughty, Scholar of the said house, It is Ordered : That the Master 
and Fellowes shall proceed against the said ~- Doughty, accord- 



270 THE VISITORS 5 REGISTER. 

Oct. 22, 1649. inge to the Statutes of the House, and make report thereof to the 
Visitors accordingly. 

Sheifeild, It is Ordered : That John Shefeild shall have as much allowance 

aj y (for seven monthes) from Baly [Balliol] Colledge as was paid to any 

other Scholar of that House. 

(P. 283). Whereas it appeareth by a Certificate, that there is 22 due to 
Oct. 22 th , 1649. Thomas Ashurst for the education of his sonnes at schoole (by 
Ashurst, allowance of the Master and Fellowes of Universitie Colledge) upon 

TTinvcrsitic 

Coll: the 17 th No: next: These are to desire the Master and Fellowes of 

the said Colledge to take the case of Thomas Ashurst into their 
consideration, and allow him somewhat for his five journeyes from 
Kent to Oxon: and pay the Exhibition due to his sonnes : 

Present of the Visitors : 

The Vice-Chancellor. 11 Dr. Rogers. 
Dr. Wilkinson, Sen. Dr. Cheynell. 

Dr. Harris. 

Oct. 29 th , 1649. Ordered : That all Masters of Arts and Batchlors of Arts, and 
Vid: pa: 230. other Students chosen by the Visitors to be Fellowes or Scholars of 
any Colledge, whether they proceede here or come from any other 
Universitie, shall enjoy such senioritie in their respective Houses as 
is allowed them by the Statutes and customes of the Universitie, 
and not otherwise. 

Scholars made And whereas wee understand from the Delegates of the Visitation : 
That some Demyes chosen by the Visitors into Magdalen Colledge 
who are of very good hopes for life and learninge, are not in rigor 
capable of beinge made Fellowes by reason of those Counties of 
which they were : soe that they are not as yet in the same capacitie 
and condition as formerly Demyes were in, out of which ordinarily 
Fellowes were chosen: It is Ordered: That all Demyes whosoever, 

a This is the last registered record of Reynolds as acting with the rest of the 
Visitors. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 271 

put in by the Visitors may be eligible into Fellowships, if they shall Oct - 29 > 1649 - 
approve themselves to the Colledge for life and learninge. 

Whereas there hath beene much difference amonge the Fellowes (** 284.) 
of Universitie Colledge (concerninge the settlement of the said ^ 6 ^ b ' 29th ' 
Colledge) arisinge upon proposalls made for settlement thereof by j)iff erence i n 
S r Thomas Hampston : It is Ordered : That Mr. Washington and Universitie 
Mr. Woodhead give in their exceptions to the said proposalls by 
Tuesday, the 6 th No: next. 

Whereas, Eobert Norton, kinsman to Sir Symon Bennett, is Oct. 29 th , 1649. 
recommended to our favor, wee doe hereby recommend him to the Nor * 01 \ recom - 
Master and Fellowes of Universitie Colledge to be maintayned out University 
of Sir Symon Bennett's donation, 3 in such a proportion as the guift Coll: 
and yearely revenue will beare, untill the said donation be further 
setled. 

Ordered : That Mr. Wirge, of Trinitie Colledge, be hereby re- Octob. 29, 

quired to performe the dutie of his place in that Colledge, or to 

Wire Trinitie 
shew cause to us (why he doth declyne it) upon the 12 th Novemb: Coll:' 

next. 

Ordered : That the President and Fellowes of Corpus Christi Oct. 29 th , 1649. 
Colledge be hereby desired to shew cause why Mr. Saunderson is corpus Christi 
not admitted into a Fellowship in that Colledge accordinge to our Coll: 
Order bearinge date Octob: 12 th , 1648. 

Whereas, upon the Petition of Thomas Ashurst, and perusall of (1 J . 285.) 
the Will of Mr. Gunsley, wee find: That two of the sonnes of the ^ b - 29 '"> 
said Petitioner have right to two places in Universitie Colledge, of ^hurst- ri-ht 
the foundation of Mr. Gunsley. Wee therefore Order, That one of to a place m 
the sonnes of Tho: Ashurst shall forthwith be admitted into the said Coll-^ 
Colledge, and the other shall be admitted soe soone as the other 
place shall be voyd : 

a Sir Simon Bennett, Bart, was one of the chief benefactors of University College. 
His bequest dated from 1631. 



272 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Nov. 6 th , 1649. Whereas there was an agreement made betweene the President 
Rents of St: and Fellowes of Jo: Baptist Colledge on the one part, and Ferrers 
Randoll, Esq. on the other part: That the said Ferrers Randoll 
should pay the summe of an hundred marks only to the said Col- 
ledge as longe as the Civill Warrs continued in their heate and 
violence betweene the two armies : And it doth appeare that the 
Fee-farme rents which are of a considerable value, togeather with 
the severall Exhibitions, are to be paid out of the said 100 marks: 

It is this day Ordered : That all arreares due to the Organist and 
Quire of the said Colledge before the date of the agreement afore- 
said shalbe paid to the Organist and Singinge Men of the said 
Quire as they shall be receaved ; the Fee-farme rents, Exhibitions, 
and all other incident charges beinge first deducted : And tho 
Bursar of the Colledge aforesaid is to take notice hereof, and make 
payment to the said Organist and Quire accordingly. 

(P. 286.) Resolved : That the 3 Fellowes of Magdalen Colledge (that 

Nov. 6 th , 1649. formerly had leave given them to follow their businesse in London) 

Felf^called shall be required to repaire to their Colledge by Saturday fortnight. 

fromLond: And after such retourne they shall thenceforth have noe leave to 

goe out of towne but in a statutable way. 

Memorand : That the Irish gentlemen shall be remembred when 
any place is voyd. a 

Nov. 6 th , 1649. Whereas there is a difference amongst some Members of Merton 
M^rto^Cd 1 } Colled g e about senioritie in the Colledge: it is Ordered, That the 
See pag-. 293. Delegates of the Universitie be desired to take the matter into their 

consideration, and to make report thereof to us at our next meet- 

inge. 

Nov. 6 th , 1649. Ordered : That all and every Fellow of Universitie Colledge who 
Mr. Jackson, hath receaved any summe or summes of money of Mr. Jackson, tenant 
Universitie to ^ ie sa ^ Colledge, doe pay in all moneyes receaved into the publique 

a The claims of the Irish had been specially recognised in the Injunctions of 
Edward VI.'s Commissioners in 1549. See W. of All Souls, p. 72. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 273 

treasury of the said Colledge upon the 7 th of Novemb: in the fore- Nov - 6 > 1649 - 
noone, and that the Master of the said Colledge doe cause this Order 
to be put in execution accordingly. 

Whereas wee, the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, have Nov. 6 th , 1649. 
beene earnestly moved to use our best endeavors towards the (P. 287.) 
setlinge of Sir Symon Bennett's guift to Universitie Colledge; and 
in order thereunto have inquired into the state of that businesse: Bennet's 



Wee doe find that the arreares of rent due and payable to the Col- Fonnd': in Uni- 

versitie Coll: 
ledge by Mr. Jackson, the tenant, doe much exceede the fine which 

he saith hee paid to the Colledge. 

Whereas heretofore the Anatomy Schoole hath beene in the Novemb. 9 th . 

1649 

keepinge of the same person that had the keepinge of all the other Anatom 
Schooles, who had the libertie and priviledge to shew the Anatomes Schoole. 
(and whatsoever els was there to be scene) to such persons as were ' 
desirouse to see them: It is Ordered: That James Browne, who 
keeps the keyes of the Schooles, shall also have the keyes of that 
place where the Anatomies and other things are, which formerly 
were in the Anatomic Schoole, and shall have libertie to shew the 
same to any that desire to see them, to make his best advantage 
thereby. 

Whereas Mr. Wirge, Fellow of Trinity Colledge, hath absented (P- 288.) 

himselfe from that Colledge without Statutable lycence, and nee- ?5 > . T>12 3. lfi .1?' 

. Wirge,Trimtie 

glected the duty of his place: It is this day Ordered : That the said Coll: 
Mr. Wirge shall not enjoy any benifitt of his place untill hee hath 
given satisfaction to the Visitors of this Universitie or the President 
of the Colledge aforesaid. 

Ordered: That Mr. Hampson and Mr. Bennett be recommended Novemb: 12 th , 
to the Master and Fellowes of Universitie Colledge, to be provided Mr Hampson 

for as Fellowes in such a proportion as the donation of Sir Symon and Mr. 

Bcnnct 
Bennett's will beare, with the other that were formerly elected and Universitie 

admitted. 

CAMD. SOC. 2 N 



274 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



(P. 290.) 

Order con- 
cerninge the 
Engagement. 



Nor. 12, 1649. At the Comittee for Reformation of the Universitye of Oxon: 
Noverab. 9 th , 1649. [This is wrongly headed; it is an 
Order by the Visitors.] 

Whereas it was Ordered by the Parliament, upon the ii th October 
last, that the Comittee for regulating the Universities doe cause 
all the Heads, Fellowes, Graduates, and Officers of the severall 
Colleges and Halls in both or either of the Universities respectively 
to subscribe this Engagement: I doe declare and promise that I 
will be true and faithfull to the Commonwealth of England as the 
same is now established without a King or House of Lords: 

Wee, the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon, having receaved an 
Order from the Comittee for Regulating the Universitie, requiring 
you to observe the directions of Parliament, doe transmitt the said 
Order and Engagment to you that you may make your Retourne 
accordingly.* 

To all and everie the Heads of the severall Colledges 
and Halls in this Universitie or their Deputies. 

* The " Engagement " was so distasteful to the University generally that a serious 
attempt was made to evade the Order by means of a Petition from Convocation 
to the effect that it might be sufficient to "declare and promise that they will live 
quietly and peaceably in their places and callings under the present Government; and 
as they have done hitherto, so still shall submit thereunto in all lawfull thinges." 
Reg. Conv. T. Dec. 18, 1649. This failed. "Soon after the Visitors, patched up 
with Independents, went from College to College (having before cited the members 
to appear), and in the Common Hall of each place gave the said Engagement to 
their respective members, especially such that were Foundation men, and all (as I 
think) to whom it was offered took it. D r . Reynolds, Dean, and D r . Mills, and D r . 
Pocock, Canons of Christchurch, refusing it, were ejected in the year 1651. (Annals.) 
Conant on the other hand took it under a protest which evacuated it of all meanino- 
(Introduction); and Sanderson had written, with his accustomed skill in casuistry 
to show how it might be taken with a safe conscience. Reynolds, who seems to 
have been a man of a gentle nature, was probably glad to escape from an office 
which had obliged him to bear a part in much violence. The " execution " of his 
Sovereign had taken place not many months before, and he might be glad to retire 
in favour of Greenwood, who was well fitted for the post of Vice-Chancellor. The 
Independents, however, who now began to take the lead, were by no means willing 
to let Reynolds keep his Deanery; and he had to give way till his party once more 
got the upper hand, a little before the Restoration. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 275 

After longe debate of the affaires of Universitie Colledge : As to Nov. 13 th , 
the poynt of election of Fellowes and Scholars, it is fully agreed: j 
But it is hereby Ordered : That all other differences touchinge the E1 . ' f 
further settlement of Sir Syraon Bennett's donation be referred to fell: in Uni- 
the Master and Fellowes of the said Colledge, to heare and deter- v< 
myne, if they can; if they cannot compose them, then they are to 
report the same to the Visitors in convenient tyme. 

Upon the motion and desire of Doctor Edward Hide in the ( p - 289 
behalfe of Dr. James Hide, Fellow of Corpus Christi Colledge, that S^Ed 
his case may be heard before the Visitors : It is Ordered : That the Hide in the 
same shall receave a full hearinge imediately upon the retourne of j ames Hide, 
the President from London, and that Doctor Hide shall have notice 
of the tyme to be appoynted for the same. 

Upon the Petition of Mr. Sayer (late Fellow of Merton Colledg) Dec. 24, 1649. 
to the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon : It is Ordered by the said Merton Coll: 
Visitors : That the consideration of his Petition be referred to the 
Warden and Fellowes of Merton Colledge aforesaid to make such 
Order therein as they shall thinke most meete and convenient. 

Ordered : That the Senior Fellow of Universitie Colledge doe Dec - 24 > 1649 - 
appeare before the Visitors upon Fryday next, with those of the the Senior 

House that preferred the Petition. And that they bring with them Fell ?y * ^ ni " 

r r*-\ i i 11 vcrsitic \_/oii \ 

the decree of Chanchery, and such other writings as may enable 

them to make some refference to the Petition. 

Whereas wee have receaved a faire Testimony of the civilitie of Dec. 27, 164'J. 
Lodovicke Mason, and that there is good hope of his proficiency ( p> 291 ^ 
in all parts of ingenuouse learning : It is this day Ordered, for preferment, 
the incouragment of his studies, That in case hee shall approve 
himselfe to any Societie in Oxon, they may elect the said Lodovice 
Mason into any place whereof they shall judge him capable. 

Whereas Attwood, Clerke of Magdalen Colledge, was designed Dec - 28 

. & . Attwood . 

for Merton Colledg, but upon examination it doth appeare that he Mag. Coll. 



276 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Dec 28, n;4J>. is incapable of a Feliowshipp there, because he cannot take his 
degree in due time, and hee is elswhere provided for : It is this 
day Ordered : That upon assurance of S r Nathaniell Brent's con- 
currence, S r Cripps be and hereby is elected into that Fellowship 
(P. 292.) o f Merton Colledge whereunto Attwood was designed : And that 
S r Cripps be admitted into the said Feliowshipp according to his 
senioritie, to receave all the rights and profitts and priviledges of 
a Fellow in the said Colledge as soone as S r Nathaniell Brent 
his consent be signified unto the sub-Warden of that Colledge. 

Jan. 4, 1G49. Whereas Samuel Lee, Master of Arts and Fellow of Wadham 
Mr. Lte, Colledge in Oxon, was recomended (by the honorable Comittee 

Wadham v * 

Coll. for reformation of the Universitie of Oxon) unto the Warden and 

Fellowes of Alsoules Colledge, to be elected Fellow into the said 
Colledge: (and also at the request and desire of divers of the Fel- 
lowes of the Colledge and their information that Dr. Janson, a his 
Feliowshipp in the said Colledge is now actually voyd): Wee doe 
thereupon elect the said Samuel Lee into Dr. Janson's place afore- 
said, that hee may actually and presently receave and enjoy all 
and singuler the rights, profitts, and priviledges of a Fellow in the 
aforesaid Colledge : And wee also desire the Fellowes of the Colledge 
to cause this our Order to be entred into the Register of the said 
Colledge. 

(P. 293.) Upon heareing the case of the Fellowes lately elected into Merton 
Jan. 4, 1649. r . ^ . J . . . . 

Senioritie: Colledge: It is Ordered that they shall have their senioritie in the 

see^a" ^86 sa ^ House according to their standing in the Universitie : And wee 
hereby desire the Sub- warden forth with to admitt them accordingly. 

Jan. 4, 1649. Upon full debate of the case of S r Franke, Fellow of Merton 

Merton Coll. Colledge, it is Ordeied: That hee shall have his seniorit in the 

said Colledge, according as hath beene formerly determined by the 

a Dr, lanson, afterwards created a Baronet, was the Fellow of All Souls who 
guarded the College money on its way to Nottingham for the King in 1642. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTEE. 277 

Delegates and our owne Orders : Ancl wee hereby desire the Sub- 
warden forthwith to admitt the said S r Franke accordingly. 

It is Ordered: That the case of appeale of Dr. Hide, Fellow of Dr. Hide, 
Corpus Christi Colledge, shalbe heard and determined on Monday chmti 
sennight, being the 28th of this instant January, at the Deane's Colledge. 
lodgings in Christ Church at 2: of the clocke in the afternoone, of 
which the President and Fellowes of Corpus Christi Colledge are 
desired to take notice, that they may be there present to informc 
the Visitors in the aforesaid businesse, and to bring with them the 
Statutes, Eegisters, and Orders which ^may any way concerne the 
same. 

It is Ordered : That the Bursars of Alsoules Colledge shall attend Jan- 15 > 
i -IT- , . . . . TLT Bursars, 

the Visitors at their next sitting to mforme them concerninge Mr. All-Soules. 

Appletree's sonne and Mr. Bowles, formerly elected into this Col- 
ledge, and also how long Mr. Lloyd and Mr. Scott have been 
Statutably absent, and their places vacant. 

Upon consideration had of the case of Mr. Chudleigh of Exeter (P. 294.) 
Colledge: It is Ordered: That hee shall take his degree according c^udley, 
to his standing and priviledg in the Universitie, notwithstanding Exeter Coll. 
any Statutes of the Colledge, but yet not prejudicinge any of his 
seniors in the said Colledge. 

Whereas the President and Fellowes of Magdalen Colledge should Jan. 18, 1649. 
have proceeded at Magdalen-tyde last to an election of Fellowes Magd. Coll. 
in the roome of some Fellowes whose places either actually were or 
ought to have been made voyd : It is therefore Ordered by the 
Visitors that the President and Fellowes of the said Colledge pro- 
ceede to an Election of Fellowes, in the roome of those Fellowes 
whose places are actually voyde or voydable by Statute; and that 
the said election be made before the Colledge proceede to chuse 
their yearly officers, and the said persons so chosen shall be Pro- 
bationers till Magdalen-tyde next. 



278 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

164950* Forasmuch as it is informed that Mr. Lloyd, Fellow of Alsoules 
Jan 18 1649 Colledge, hath long absented himselfe from the Colledge beyond all 
Mr. Lloyd, Statutable leave: And noe accompt is given of him where hee is: 
It is Ordered : That Mr. Lloyd's Fellowshipp be hereby declared 
voyd, and that Mr. Lee, according to a former Order, be hereby 
established and confirmed in a voyd Fellowship in the said Col- 
ledge. 

(P. 295.> Upon complaint made to us by Mr. Walker, Fellow of Brazen 

Ja " 6 |g th ' a Nose Colledge, that the Colledge doth detaine from him some 

Mr. Walker dues, and profitts of his Fellowship there : It is Ordered : That 

Brasennose the Principall and Fellowes t>f the said Colledge show cause (the 

next sitting of the Visitors) why the said Mr. Walker should not 

receave all the rights, profitts, and priviledges of his Fellowship in 

the said Colledge. 

Jan. 28th, 11 It is Ordered: That Dr. James Hide shall forthwith receave all 

} the rights and profitts of his Fellowship in Corpus Christi Colledge 

Corpus Christi due to him hefore the tyme hee was removed by the Colledge : 

And wee hereby appoynt to heare his case further on Monday the 

llth of Feb: next betweene 9 and 10 of the clocke in the forenoone, 

at the Deane's Lodgings in Christ Church: whereof the parties 

concern'd therein are desired to take notice. 

Jan. 28th, Upon hearing and debating the case of Mr. Walker, Fellow of 

Brazen Nose Colledge: It is concluded: That hee shall not be 
Mr. Walker, n ,.. . . . , , _ 

Brazen Nose reputed Master of Arts in this Universitie till hee be nrst mcor- 

Coll> porated according to the custome of the said Universitie, neither is 

hee to have any share of the fines (which he hath not already 
receaved) being not incorporated. 

(P. 296.) Upon the Petition of John Hill, Thomas Smithsby, Eobert 

Feb. l, 1649. Powell, and Thomas Millington, Bachelors of Arts, and Fellowes of 

n Between the dates of these two Orders, viz. on Jan. 23, 1649-50, Philip, Earl 
of Pembroke and Montgomery, the Chancellor, died. The office remained vacant 
for nearly a year, till Cromwell was elected Chancellor on Jan. 1, 1650-1. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 279 

Alsoules Colledge, complayning that they suffer much prejudice in Feb. 1 > 
the Colledg both in poynt of profitt and precedencie, by the late 
extraordinary favor of graunting Degrees of Bachelors in Law and 

Physicke unto Mr. Hunt, Mr. Pett, King, and 

Scroope, Fellowes also of the said Colledg, being all of them 
juniors to them aforesaid in the Universitie and in the Colledge, 

saving that Hunt and King were only first admitted 

into the said Colledg before Mr. Millington: It is thought fitt and 
Ordered: That the said Mr. Hill, Thomas Smithsby, Robert Powell, 
and Thomas Millington be admitted and reputed Masters of Arts in 
the Colledge: And that all of them be admitted to equal 1 divi- 
dents: And as to the proportion of such dividents, it is left to 
the said Colledg to determine whether their dividents shall be 
according to their Degrees either taken in the Universitie, or 
allowed and given by this Order, or according to their former con- 
dition before Degrees taken or given. 

Wee the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon have heard the Feb. 5th, 
Case of Mr. Hobbs, Fellow of Magdalen Colledge, debated before ' 

us, but for any thing that wee personally know, or appeares to us Fell. Magd. 
upon the Register, wee find not that Mr. Hobbs was restored to his 
Vote in the Colledg as hee pretends. 

Upon debate of the Order of Jan: 19th, 1648, concerning (P. 297.) 
Senioritie, whether the meaning of it is, That those who were put Feb. 5tll > 
into places by the Visitors should have senioritie inter se invicem, 
and not of those who were in the House before them, and juniors in Senioritie. 
the Universitie : It is concluded : That the intent of the said 
Order is, that those who were put in by the Visitors should have 
senioritie not only one of another according to their standing in 
the Universitie, but of those also who were their juniors in the 
Universitie although seniors in the House. 

It is Ordered: That Mr. Greaves his businesse shall be heard on Feb: nth, 
Wednesday next at two of the clock in the afternoone, at the 
Deane's lodgings in Christ Church, of which the parties under- heard. 



280 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



Fellowes of Merton Colledge. 



Feb. 11, named are desired to take notice, and to be there present to give 

1649-50. .. -if -j i 

testimony in the aforesaid busmesse. 

Mr. Fisher, Sub- Warden 

of Merton Colledge 
Mr. Button 
Mr. French 
Mr. Howson 
Mr. Brent 
Mr. "Wright 

In the case of appeale of Dr. James Hide, It is Ordered: That 
the state of the businesse be drawne up, and transmitted to the 
Comittec for Regulating the Universitie: And that the Colledge, 
and Dr. Edward Hide on the behalfe of his brother James Hide, 
doe agree on the state of the case if they can; otherwise the dif- 
ferences betwcene them to be referred to the Visitors, who will 
thereupon certifie the truth of the businesse as it lyes before them. 



Dr. Hide, 

Universitie 

Coll: 

Feb: llth, 
1649. 



(P. 298.) 

Vide pa: 306. 

Dr. Lloyd 



The Visitors of the Universitie, taking into consideration the case 
f Doctor Lloyd, doe humbly certifie: That no cause or matter 
appeared against him but his non-appearance upon summons being 
then (as they are now informed) out of distance in remote parts. 
And that hee hath since given satisfaction concerninge his absence. 



Feb. llth, Upon debate of the Order of the 19th Jan. 1648, concerning 

Seniority, whether the meaning of it is that those who were put 

Senioritie ac- into places by the Visitors should have senioritie inter se invicem, 



standing in the 
Universitie. 
vid. pa. 230. 



an( ^ not f those w ^ were i n tn e H use before them and juniors 
in the University: It is concluded: That the intent of the said 
Order is that those who were elected by the Visitors should have 
senioritie not only of one another according to their standing in 
the Universitie but of those also who are their juniors in the 
Universitie, although seniors to them in the House." 

This Order is almost identical with that of Feb. 5. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 281 

Whereas Edward Terrie hatli beene chosen by the common con- Feb. 13, 1649. 
sent of theDeane and Cannons to be Student of Christ Church, and Terrie.Student 
that his place may not fall voyd till he hath tyme to proceede church! 
Batchelor, and then by the ordinary course of the House he cannot 
be admitted : The Visitors having receaved very good testimony 
of his deserts and good life, and that hee hath longe stayed in ex- 
pectation of such a place in that Colledge, doe thinke fitt and order: (P. 299.) 
That the said Terrie may proceede to take his degree of Batchelor 
in his due tyme: And that hee shall be admitted into the said 
place into which hee was elected soe soone as the same shall become 
voyd in course, notwithstanding hee shall have taken his degree 
of Batchelor of Arts before. 

Whereas Mr. Greaves hath declared that Mr. French, Fellow of Feb. 13, 1649. 
Merton Colledge, is the partie accused concerninge the plate and Mr. French 
treasurie delivered out of the said Colledge, it is Ordered (at the 
Petition of the said Mr. French) : That he shall have copies of the 
Interrogatories exhibited by Mr. Greaves, and shall have liberty to 
crosse-examine witnesses upon Interrogatories for his owne defence. 
The depositions to be taken on Fryday next, being the fifteenth of 
this instant February, and the parties and witnesses on both sides 
to attend accordingly. 

Ordered : That the Suspension of Mr. Henry Whitwicke be Feb. 19, 1649. 
taken off (his Submission beinge receaved), and that hee shall Mr. Whitwick 
receave his stypends and dues belonginge to his place in Pembrooke Suspension 
Colledge, both the arrears due to him for tyme past, and the profitts taken of - 
thereof for future tyme, as fully as if noe Suspension had beene 
made. 

To the Eight Worshipfull the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon. (P. 300.) 

The humble Petition of John French, Fellow of Merton Feb. 19, 1649. 

Colledge : Mr. French, 

Merton Col: 
Sheweth, That whereas your Petitioner hath been lately put to Petition. 

divers troublesome and very chargable journeyes to London, and 

CAMD. SOC, 2 O 



282 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Feb. 19, long and frequent attendances upon the right honorable the Com- 
mittee for Regulating the Universitie of Oxford, all which have 
beene occationed to your Petitioner by Mr. Greaves his perseqution 
against him, as supposing your Petitioner to have beene the sole 
cause of his the said Mr. Greaves being put out of his Fellowshipp 
of Merton Colledge, and of other places which he the said Mr. 
Greaves formerly had : 

Now for the full manifestation of the truth concerning the pre- 
mises, and for clearing of your Petitioner's inocency therein, he 
humbly desireth your worships' certificate to the right honorable 
Committee touching the true cause for which the said Mr. Graves 
was by you put out of his said Fellowshipp, or of any other of his 
said places, soe farre as you know or understand : And whether 
your Petitioner did ever give any voluntary information against 
him concerning the same, but as he was summoned and required 
by you to testifie the truth. 

And your Petitioner shall pray, &c. 
(P. 301.) 

A Return con- Upon the humble Petition of Mr. John French, of Merton Col- 
Graves, ledge, hereunto annexed : We doe humbly certifie that Mr. John 
Merton Coll. Qreaves, of Merton Colledge aforesaid, was not put out of his 
Fellowship or any other place here by any Articles or voluntary 
information exhibited against him by Mr. French before the Visita- 
tion: But that Mr. French among other witnesses had spetiall 
summons to appeare before the Visitors to be examined concerning 
Mr. Greaves, and that hee was only examined as a wittness ac- 
cordingly. 

And wee further certifie : That the said Mr. Greaves did not 
appeare upon summons according to the Ordinance of Parliament 
of the 2lth April, 1648, nor declared his submission to the autho- 
ritie of Parliament in the Visitation. And upon Certificate thereof 
to the honorable Committee for Regulatinge the Universitie, the 
said Committee did upon the 1st of August, 1848, order that the 
said Mr. Greaves (among others) should be removed from his place 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 283 

and expelled the Universitie. Whose Order the Visitors did the 
rather put in execution because there were then Articles before them 
against him which had been prepared and taken upon the evidence 
and testimonies of such witnesses as were examined thereupon : the 
tenor of which articles we herewith send, together with the testi- 
mony of Mr. Edward Copley, Fellow of Merton Colledge, a person 
of credit, who was at the same tyme examined before the Visitors 
in that businesse, and is since deceased. 

Memorand: That the Articles herein maintained are registred, 
pa: 262. 

.. A further Charge against Mr. Greaves. ^p 302 .) 

Mr. Greaves gave Father Phillips, the Queene's Confessor, and ^j^ s Mr 
Wyatt, leave to come into the Library in Merton Colledge. Hee Graves, 
put Mr. French out of his chamber in Merton Colledge and put Merton Coll: 
them into it. He charged mee to be in redinesse with the keys of 
the treasury that the King might take the Colledge money, 400/. 
and upwards as I remember, as due to his Majestic by vertue of a 
Statute as he pretended. There was brought a letter from the 
King commanding a new Sub-warden to be elected ; this letter was 
delivered to him and read by him to the company, whereon he 
was chosen Sub-warden, and Mr. Corbett put out of the place. 
Whereas the Senior Fellow (who then was present) was by right to 
have publisht it, and he is by custom of the Colledge Pro-subwarden 
in the Sub-warden's absence. Greaves sent a letter to me that the 
Warden's place was vacant, and desired me to give my voyce to 
Dr. Harvey. 

Hee pronounc't Mr. Button's chamber voyd. taking advantage 
of his absence at London in tyme of the warre, by which rneanes 
hee had noe place in the House to lay his books and goods. He 
put Mr. Button out of his place of Deane in Merton Colledge, and 
put in Mr. Neuall in his absence : Whereas hee was not necessarily 
required to be there; and in his absence I was ready to performe 
those things that belong to his place, as formerly I had donne. 



284 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Feb. 19, Avis Smith made many complaints to mee that from tyme to 

1649-"0 

tyme hee lent out the Colledge goods, and for this I remember hee 

never askt the consent of the Company as the custome is, but gave 
them out by his owne strength, thereby gratifiinge many of the 
cortiers. 

All this I testifie to be true : 

EDWARD COPLEY. 

This was given in June 6th, 1648. 

KA: AUSTEN, Keg: Com: 

(P. 303.) Jan: 17th, 1649, 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Mr. Graves Upon the Petition of Mr. John Greaves, late Fellow of Merton 
Coll: Colledge in Oxon: It is Ordered: That it be referred to the 

Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon to examine such wittnesses as 
shall be named by him upon such Interrogatories as hee shall 
exhibite, touchinge the deliverie of the plate and Colledge treasury 
to the late Kinge: and that such examinations be taken by the said 
Visitors within five weeks and retourned to this Committee ; and 

noe longer tyme is to be given. 

FRAN: Rous. 

March 1, 1649. Ordered : That noe weoman shall be permitted to make beds or 

in the severall doe any other service for Students and Scholars in any Colledge or 

Coll: Hall in this Universitie of Oxon, but auncient weomen and of good 

report, such as shall be approved of by the Governors of everie 

Colledge and Hall: who are hereby desired to take spetiall care 

that this Order be diligently observed in their respective Houses.* 

March 1,1649. Ordered: That noe Fellowes or Scholars of any Colledge, of 
to supp abroad what degree or qualitie soever, shall upon any fasting night goe 
upon fasting f or th to supper in any taverne, alehouse, or victualling house, 

a Many Colleges had an original provision in their Statutes, " quod omnia minis- 
teria fiant per masculos" with an exception for the laundress. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 285 

unlesse upon some spetiall cause approved by the Governours in the Mar. l, 
respective Houses : And it is hereby referred to the said Governours 
and their Societies to provide some other way for their refection 
within their owne Houses respectively.* 

b This Order shows that snppers in taverns, alehouses, or victualling houses, were 
at this period, in defiance of old University Statutes, the actual rule and practice of 
the whole University. This may also be gathered from Wood's remark upon the 
Order: " Whereupon in most or all Colleges supper was allowed on those nights in 
their respective refectories." Even the Visitors recognise the tavern suppers on 
other nights. 

The history of these taverns, &c., is interesting, and may perhaps some day he 
found a subject not too humble for a special investigation. Their great number 
in Oxford at the present time, which is out of proportion to the population, is itself 
an indication of an ancient history. It is well known that some of them occupy 
the sites, perhaps even portions of the buildings, of those medieval Halls which, 
to the number of some three hundred, housed, before the institution of Colleges, the 
members of the University. Wood's MSS. furnish the names of two hundred, and 
he believed there had been one hundred more. The process seems to have been this: 
The Colleges, in the 14th and 15th centuries, gradually absorbed most of the old 
Halls, and in so doing largely reformed the habits of students ; but nevertheless the 
practice soon began to spring up of each of them having a particular tavern or 
taverns to which the members of the Colleges were used to resort. As the severity 
of College discipline relaxed, the practice grew to be systematic. Thus those Halls 
which were not absorbed into Colleges, and yet ceased to house undergraduates, 
found a use which perpetuated their existence in another way ; while their antiquity 
and respectable origin had no doubt a tendency to prevent their extinction. At the 
period of the Commonwealth there were but seven which, retaining their original 
function, had survived the sure and steady progress of the Colleges in occupying the 
educational ground ; Broadgates Hall, the origin of which Wood traced to Saxon 
times, having been turned into Pembroke College not long previously. Of these seven, 
Gloucester Hall, founded in 1283, became Worcester College in 1714 ; Hart Hall, of 
about the same date, we have observed in its various transformations in connection 
with Magdalen Hall (see note to p. 117); the remaining five may be noticed here, 
since the extinction of some of them is proceeding under the hands of the Royal 
Commissioners while these sheets are passing through the press. St. Edmund Hall, 
which is coeval with Hart and Gloucester, is about to be more intimately connected 
with Queen's College than before, though not to be merged in it ; St. Alban Hall, of 
the 14th century, is to be merged in Merton; St. Mary Hall and New Inn Hall, 
of about the same date, in Oriel and Balliol Colleges, respectively. The founda- 
tion of Keble College and the Unattached system are thought to have at last rendered 
these institutions, nearly the most ancient in Oxford, obsolete. But they can never 



286 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Mar. 1, It is Ordered : That S r Hawley of Merton Colledge (if hee stand 

" ' for any place in the Universitie) doe bringe a sufficient testi- 

Hawley of moniall to the Visitors for his learninge and conversation : And in 

Merton Coll: order hereunto Dr. Greenewood, Mr. Cornish, and Mr. Button, are 

amined. desired to appoynt some convenient tyme for examination of the 

said S r Hawley, who is to apply himselfe to them for that purpose. 
Mar. 12, 1649. 

Hide, Corpus Upon full debate of the case of Dr. James Hide, late Fellow of 

Christ! Coll: 

be forgotten ; for they have done much good service ; and it has already appeared in 
these pages that they have played an important part in Oxford history. 

The taverns, some of which were their lowlier brethren, have, to do them justice, 
shown more vitality: whether the fittest or not, they survive. Wood speaks of the 
excessive number of alehouses in the reign of James I. ; Bancroft, Abbot, and Laud 
did their utmost to repress the evil. Abbot, in 1616, required the Warden of All 
Souls to punish such of his Society as, " neglecting their studies, do spend their 
time abroad in taverns and alehouses to the deformation of scholars and scandal of 
your house" (W. of All Souls, 126). Laud justly prided himself on having reduced 
the number from 300 to 100. (Works': Lib. of Anglo- Catholic Theology, v. part i. 
p. 247.) The Civil War had undone many of the reforms which Laud had effected; 
but the efforts of the Parliamentary Visitors to establish a better state of things were 
seconded by an improvement which took place at this very time, and which was not 
unconnected with their supremacy. Like the Temperance movement of our own day, 
there was a successful attempt to introduce coffee in the place of beer. Wood con- 
stantly mentions the coffee-houses which, during the interregnum, were the places of 
meeting for scientific and musical men. The debased disputations, after the fashion of 
the Schools, over pots of beer, were succeeded by the enlightened discussions, which 
heralded and formed the Koyal Society, over " dishes " of coffee, and by the concerts 
on stringed instruments which engaged the talents of the masters of music, who, on 
their expulsion from cathedrals and churches, flocked to Oxford. In London we 
know how these coffee-houses became classical. 

After the Restoration ale and beer drove out the coffee, and once more asserted 
their supremacy. At least we hear nothing of the latter ; while Dr. Bathurst, 
writing in 1674, says: " Our alehouses, by reason of the town's immoderate licen- 
sing, and the plausible plea of improving His Majesty's Excise, are thriven into 
several hundreds." (Warton's Life of Bathnrst, p. 104.) No one could speak with 
more authority on this point, as he had been one of the enlightened scientific inquirers 
of the earlier period of his residence, and did his best for his College and University 
during the later. The abuses of which he speaks have operated more or less ever 
since ; but in justice to modern Oxford it is but fair to mention that the proportion 
of drunken offences is considerably less than might be expected from the number of 
public-houses. The Temperance reform is already making itself felt in many ways. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 287 

Corpus Christ! Colledge, and upon all that hath beene offered Mar. 12, 
before us, we conclude that the Act of the Colledge in pronouncing 
the said Dr. Hide non socius is just, and the same is hereby ratified 
and confirmed. 

Ordered, with the consent of Queene's Colledge and Lincolne Mar. 13, 1649. 
Colledge, signified by the respective Heads of both those Houses : Mr. Owen, 
That Mr. Owen, a Fellow of Lincolne Colledge, be, and hereby is Proctor - 
elected and appoynted to be, Proctor of this Universitie for this next 
yeare : And that Queene's Colledge are hereby enabled to nominate 
and elect a Proctor of the Universitie the very next tyme that it 
comes to Lincolne Colleege turne to elect accordinge to the Cycle. 

Ordered: That the persons hereafter mentioned be elected and Mar. 13, 1649. 
appoynted Officers in Alsoules Colledge in Oxon: to continue in ( p< 305- ) 
their said offices untill the next election : And this Order take pointed in 
effect assoone as it shall be published to the Societie by the Warden A1 |-Soules 
of the said Colledge. 

Mr. Johnson, Subwarden. 

Mr. Prestwich, Deane of Arts. 

Mr. Hunt, Deane of Law. 

Mr. Sprigge, Senior Bursar. 

Mr. Basnett, Junior Bursar. 1 ' 

a This appointment, like those of last year, was abnormal. New College obtained 
the turn of which it had been then deprived : Stephens of St. Alban Hall, and 
afterwards Principal of Hart Hall, having been imported into the College by the 
Visitors; but Queen's seems to have had no one who could be trusted for the 
office of Proctor. Thankful, or Gracious, Owen, was one of the original Delegates, 
and more in the confidence of the Visitors than even Cheynell, whom, shortly after 
his appointment as Proctor, he superseded in the Presidentship of St. John's. He 
was afterwards a Visitor, and must be carefully distinguished from the more cele- 
brated Dr. John Owen, soon to be Dean of Christchurch and Vice-Chancellor. His 
name betrays his Puritan birth, but Accepted Frewen was one of the ecclesiastical 
chiefs of the High Church and Cavalier party. Expelled at the Restoration, 
Thankful Owen died a Congregational Minister in 1681. 

b This interference with All Souls, so far as to appoint all the officers of the 
College, only a year and a half after the great majority of the Fellows had been 



288 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Mar. 15, Whereas it hath beene made appeare to the Visitors of the 
1649-50. Universitie that Wadham Colledge is indebted to brewers and 
3Fellowes, bakers and others above the summe of foure hundred pounds: And 
3 Scholars the revenew of that Colledge doth consist in Backed Rents, which if 
they were fully paid would not exceede the Statutable allowances 
to the severall Members and the necessary businesses of that Foun- 
dation, whereas in these tymes they are necessitated to make many 
deductions for taxes and quarterings, beside many bad tenants that 
have failed in paying of their rents to the said Colledge : by which 
meanes they are altogether disabled for the discharge of that debt 
left upon them by their predecessors, for which their lands are 
lyable to be extended : It is therefore Ordered by the Visitors : 
That the Warden and Fellowes of the said Colledge shall have 
libertie to keep three Fellowships and three Scholarships vacant (of 
(P. 306.) those that are or shall be voyd) for the space of foure yeares from 
the next election, and that the statutable revenew belonginge to 
these vacant places shall be duly paid towards the discharge of the 
aforesaid debt, notwithstanding any thing in the Statutes of that 
Colledge to the contrary: Provided that if this debt shall by any 
other means be defrayed before that tyme, that then this Order 
shall be voyd. 

superseded by persons whom the Visitors had appointed, together with the refusal 
of the previous year to allow it to have a Proctor till Zanchy could be placed in that 
office, show that the old elements still retained, viz., the "disaffected seniors" were 
Tery'powerful. A few months later (Sept. 1 650) Millington, Pett, and others another 
batch of appointments find themselves kept out of their rights ; and a little later still 
(Jan. 17, 165$) the London Committee having required the Visitors to make a special 
visitation of the College, the latter report that they " find it is much out of order, 
both as to the worship of God in the Chapel and scholastical exercises of the House." 
Johnson, their own appointed Sub- Warden, and others, had been guilty of " negligence 
and contempt." When we consider that the Warden was non-resident ; that Zanchy, 
on whom the Visitors relied, had stayed but a short time, having gone to the wars in 
Ireland ; and that there were no Undergraduates to employ the resident Fellows in 
teaching, it is not to be wondered at that the College never recovered its order, nor 
that it adopted the abuse of Corrupt Resignations as readily as it had ever done in 
the preceding timeSi 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 289 

For explanation of the Certificate concerning Dr. Lloyd of the Mar. is, 

* '" 



llth of February, 1649: The Visitors doe further humbly certifie 

that the said Dr. Lloyd at the tyrae of his summons was then Certificate 

residing in Walles (as hath beene credibly informed before them) : exp ft 

And that the satisfaction given for his absence was, that by reason 

of some debts owing in Oxford hee could not come thither with 

securitie till he had taken some order for them, whereof the Warden 

of that Colledge [All Souls], beinge informed by letter from him- 

selfe and otherwise, was satisfied with the cause of his absence. 

Upon hearinge the case of Mr. Parsons, Fellow of Corpus Christi Mar - 22 ' 1649 - 
Colledge : Wee order, that the said Mr. Parsons shall be continued Corpus Christi 
in his Fellowship in the said Colledge and enjoy the profitts and 
priviledges thereof as aforetyme. 

Whereas Lodoweeke Mason hath beene lately chosen to be ( p - 307 -) 
Student of Christ Church at an election held there by the Deane ' ^49. 
and Prebendaries, and that his place may not fall voyd till hee hath Mason, 
tyme to proceede Bachelor of Arts : and then by the ordinary 
course of the House hee cannot be admitted : It is thought fitt and 
Ordered: That the said Lodoweeke Mason may proceede to take 
his Degree of Bachelor in due tyme : and that hee shall be admitted 
in the said Student's place into which hee was elected soe soone as 
the same shall become voyd in course ; notwithstanding hee shall 
have taken his Degree of Bachelor of Arts before. And in regard 
it is convenient to furnish that Colledge with more Bachelors and 
Masters for upholdinge of Masters' and Bachelors' exercise, and 
bearinge the offices of the House : It is Ordered : That this Order 
shall extend to any other Scholar chosen by the said Deane and 
Prebendaries at their said election. 

It is Ordered : That the Master and Fellowes of Universitie Col- Mar. 22th, 

1649 
ledge be required to repare to the said Colledge with all convenient ers i t j e 

speede, a to the end that the affaires of the Colledge may be College: 

Master 
* It would thus appear that the College was so much in debt, and its affairs so 

unsettled, that the Master and Fellows had been non-resident. It was the only case 
of the sort. 

CAMI). SOC. 2 P 



290 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Mar. 22, throughly settled : And also to show cause why the proposalls of 

1649-50. Mr Washington, Fellow of the said Colledge. offered to the Visitors, 

and Fellows . . . , 

to repair to should not be graunted. 
the Colledge. 

Mar. 28, 1650. At the Committee for Keformation of the University of Oxon. 

(P. 306.) 

Fellows of Ordered that the Visitors of the University of Oxon shall not 

Colledges not from henceforth preferre any that are actuall Fellows in any Col- 

to rciTiovG 

ledges or Halls to Fellowships in other Colledges without spetiall 
direction from the House [of Parliament]. 

March 28th, 1650. 
(P. 309.) At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Mr. Painton This Committee taking notice that divers persons have beene by 
recommended. ,, TT . . , TT . . . . -p, ,, , . 

the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon put into fellowships m 

Alsoules Colledge in Oxon: and being acquainted that their former 
Order of the 14th of June, 1649, for recommending Mr. John 
Painton to the Visitors and Warden of Alsoules Colledge in Oxon 
for a Fellowship in the said Colledge when any should be void, is 
not yet satisfied by them, doe now order that the said Mr. Painton 
be again recommended to the Visitors for the next Fellowship that 
shall be void by ejection, and that they invest him in such Fellow- 
ship accordingly.* 

FRAN: ROUSE. 

(P. 308.) Whereas there are not at this tyme Masters of Art in New Col- 
Aprill 2, 1650- ledge out of which may be chosen a sufficient number for cariinge 
on the affaires of the Colledg: And by the Statutes of the House 



ficient for the none but such as have taken the Degree of Masters can be chosen 
Colledge. 

a This and other Orders of about the same date bear evidence of the dissatisfaction 
of the London Committee with the proceedings of the Visitors, and of the Visitors 
not being much pleased at their interference. By the end of the year they are in 
open conflict. The victorious Independents would no longer brook Presbyterian 
Government in Oxford or elsewhere. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 291 

Cor that purpose: It is therefore Ordered: That the Warden and April 2, 1650. 
Fellowes of the said Colledg shall have a dispensation for the said 
Statute or Statutes, and shall have power to make as many Bachelors 
Maisters as shall be sufficient for managing and cariinge on the 
affaires and exercises of the House notwithstanding the said 
Statute. 

Present of the Visitors : April 2, 1650. 

Governor Kelsey. b Mr. Appletree. b 

Dr. Rogers. Mr. Draper. 

Dr. Harris. 

Att the Comittee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon. April 4, 1650. 

Ordered: That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon be 
required to certifie this Comittee whether their Orders of the 21th 
of March last, for approving of divers persons to be Fellowes in the 
place of those that were ejected out of their Fellowships in New 
Colledg by this Comittee, be obeyed by them according to this (P. 309.) 
Comittee's directions : And that they give this Comittee an accompt 
hereof this day sen'night, without any further notice. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon. c April 18, 1650. 

/p 3H > "> 

Whereas this Committee are informed that Degrees of all sorts Concerning' 

Degrees. 
ft Though New College examined its own men for Degrees down to quite a recent 

date, the University alone conferred them. This Order can only mean a dispen- 
sation from some of the four terms which ought by Statute to intervene between the 
B.A. and M.A. degree. 

b Kelsey and Appletree, who here sign for the first time, were not in the original 
Commission. Kelsey, as chief military officer resident, and now Governor of Oxford, 
was a person naturally to be appointed in the early days of the Visitation. He was 
a man of low origin and social position. 

c This is a very direct interference with the Visitors ; but apparently not before it 
was wanted. "Wood asserts that Degrees had been constantly given irregularly, and 
continued to be so under subsequent Visitors. " Some preachers in the army who had 
scarce smelt an academy " were created Masters of Arts by the London Committee- 
This may be an exaggeration. There is at any rate no trace of the abuse in the 
Register after this date. Necessity may have fairly covered some irregularities at 
first. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 18, 1650, have beene lately confer'd upon severall persons in the Universitie 
of Oxon against the Statutes and Customes of the said Universitie 
and the respective Coll edges and Halls thereof, the said persons 
not having tyme nor doing their excercise for such Degrees, and 
taking into their seriouse consideration the many inconveniences 
which in tyme may accrue to that Universitie by such anticipation, 
doe hereby Order and declare : 

1. That all persons whatsoever in the said Universitie and the 
severall Colledges and Halls therein that have had Degrees confer'd 
upon them since the 21th of March last without having full tyme and 

(P. 312.) n ot doing their excercise for such Degrees, according to the Statutes 
and customes of the said Universitie, shall neither enjoy profitt or 
priviledg of such Degree till his said tyme be compleated, and 
excercise performed. 

2. That from henceforth noe Degree whatsoever be confer'd on 
any but according to the usuall and due Statutes and customes of 
the said Universitie and the severall Colledges and Halls therein. 

3. That this Committee will not admitt any scholar who shall 
make application to them, not having tyme or doing his excercise 
as aforesaid, to take any Degree contrary to the Statutes and customes 
of the said Universitie and the severall Colledges and Halls therein. 

Ordered by this Committee: That the Vice Chancellor of the 
Universitie of Oxon cause this Order to be publisht in the said 
Universitie : And the severall Heads of Houses respectively are 
required likewise to publish it in their severall Colledges and Halls 
respectively, and to see it duly observed. JAMES CHALONER. 

[Letter from the Visitors to the Committee.] 

April 22, 1650. Whereas the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon are required to 
A Return con- certifie the Committee for Eeformation of the said Universitie what 
Greek 8 their opinion is concerninge the fittnesse of Dr. Harmer as to his 

Lecturer's pietie and sufficiencie for the Greeke Lecturer's place in the said 

place m the t T . . . rn . . . , r 

Uniyersitie. Universitie: 1 hey humbly certifae that they have noe such know- 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 293 - 

ledg of the said Mr. Harmer concerning either the one or the other April 22, 1650. 
qualification as to retourne a sufficient answere to the honorable 
Committee concerning him : And further they doe humbly desire 
the said Committee to take spetiall care to place such a one in that 
Lecture as may be both of thorowe abilities and of exemplaiy con- 
versasion. a 

Upon consideration of the Petition of Mistris Margarett Smith, it (P. 310.) 
is thought just, and soe Ordered: That the profitts of the places Mav 7th > 165 - 
allowed to be kept vacant in Universitie Colledg be converted 

towards the payment of the Colledg debts as was intended : And Universitie 

, r . r> -11 Colledge. 

as to the perticuler debt of the .Petitioner, together with her 

Petition, it is hereby referred to the consideration of the Master and 
Fellowes of the said Colledg, who are desired to give such releife 
to the Petitioner as to justice appertayneth, and her sad condition 
requireth. 

[Letter from the Visitors.] 

To the honorable Committee for Kegulating the Universitie of Ma y 7th, 1650. 

Oxon: MertonCoIl: 

A Retnrne. 

In obedience to the Order of the 2nd of this instant May, wee Cn PP S: Att - 

. wood, 

humbly certifie that Atwood being incapable of a Fellowship in 

Merton Colledg whereunto hee was recomended, wee elected S r 
Crips into the place of Attwood : And the generall rule which 
obtaines throughout the whole Universitie is, that hee who is 
senior in the Universitie shall enjoy his senioritie in that and 
everie Colledg: And, because wee elect seniors sometymes many 
monthes after their juniors, wee are forced to looke upon all our 
severall elections as one election, or els there would be noe order 
or peace in the Universitie, because youthes would take place of 

n John Harmer, Demy of Magdalen, was however appointed. Wood calls him 
" a most excellent philologist," hut " of a credulous humour," an amusing instance 
of which is given by Wood in his " Life." (Ath. Ox. I. xxxviii.) 



294 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

May 7, I6r>o. Masters of Arts that are elected after them : And wee cannot shew 
favor to one and deny it to another without violation of our generall 
rule, breach of order, and peace in everie House. 

(P. 311.) Ordered by the Visitors: That all the scholars of this Universitie 

? ' th > 1650> doe in their haire and habite conforme themselves to the Statutes 

the Universitie ^ ^ e same * n tnat behalfe, forbearinge all excesse and vanitie, in 

doe conforme. powdering their haire,* wearing knots of ribands, walking in 

boots and spures and bote-hose-tops : And the severall Heads of 

Colledges and Halls are desired to take spetiall and speedy care to 

see this Order put in execution in their respective Houses. 

May 7th, 1650 In consideration of the debts of Balioll Colledge: it is Resolved 
Debts Baliol by the Visitors that they will forbeare to put any Fellowes of the 
old Foundation into the said Colledge untill they shall be further 
informed by the Colledg concerning the debts thereof. 

(P. 313.) Upon an Order of the Committee for Reformation of the Uni- 
June 24, 1650. V ersitie of Oxon : It is Ordered : That the Warden or Sub-warden 
of Allsoules Colledg be desired to certifie the Visitors at their next 
sitting, on Wednesday the 26th of this Instant, how long Mr. 
Coventrie, Fellow of the said Colledg, hath beene absent, and what 
leave was given him for his absence, and whether he hath receaved 

a Hair-powder had been in fashion for half a century before this order. For 
Injunctions against unscholarlike dress, see W. of All Souls, 62, 109, 148. No doubt 
the war had aggravated the general irregularities of attire, and party distinctions 
were only too well symbolized in the outward appearance of students. Wood indig- 
nantly accuses the new-comers of being the worst offenders, and declares that not 
only had the University cap and hood become for the time almost obsolete, but that 
the Cambridge intruders had actually had the audacity to introduce a new cut of the 
academical gown. These dangerous innovations were, however, he was happy to 
think, short-lived, the Restoration having set all such matters right again. The 
ignominious failure of the attempt to make a slight change in the gown of under- 
graduates, some twenty years ago, afforded a fresh proof that it is easier to change 
more sacred things at Oxford than the costume which it has inherited from the 
Middle Ages. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 295 

the full profitts of his Fellowshipp during his absence, or what June 24, 1650. 

part thereof hee hath receaved. a A11 Souls ColL 



[Certificate by Visitors.] 

Whereas information hath beene given to the honorable Com- j uue 24. 1550 
mittee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon, That Mr. Coventrie, 
Coventrie, Fellow of Alsoules Colledg in Oxon is a delinquent, All-Soules 
and in regard thereof hath long absented himselfe from the said ColL 
Colledg, the Visitors of the said Universitie being required to 
examyne the matter both as to his delinquencie and absence: They 
doe hereby certifie the honorable Committee that they have ex- 
amined the matter, and concerning his delinquencie they cannot 
certifie anything because of his long absence for nyne yeares to- 
geather: And as to his leave for absence they can give noe accompt 
thereof, in regard the Colledg booke (wherein leave for absence is 
entred) cannot be found. 

( P 314 ) 

Upon an Order of the honorable Committee for Reformation of j nne 37 
the Universitie of Oxon, whereby it is referred to the Visitors of New Co11 
the said Universitie to heare and examyne the matter in variance 
betweene some of the inhabitants of Marshfeild in the countie of 
Glouster and one Giles Cleworth of the said towne: The Visitors 
doe hereby appoynt to heare the said businesse on this day three 
weekes, at two of the clocke in the afternoone, at the Deane's 
lodgings in Christ Church, and therefore doe desire the persons 
mentioned in the said Order to take notice hereof, and also to give 
notice to the said Giles Cleworth that hee, together with them, may 

a Henry Coventry, son of the Lord Keeper, and afterwards Secretary of State to 
Charles II. See W. of All Sonls, 294 and 390. There was as little doubt, under the 
circumstances of the war and Visitation, that he had received but small profits from 
his Fellowship, as that he was a delinquent, and an absentee for nine years. The 
strange thing is that the case should only now have been dealt with. Coventry 
came to All Souls from Queen's, where he had been a pupil of Barlow's. Through 
him Barlow became Bishop of Lincoln. 



296 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

June 27, 1650. attend the Visitors at the tyme and place aforementioned for 
hearing the matter. 

July 4th, 1650. At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of 

(P. 329.) Oxon. 

Upon reading a certificate from the Visitors of the Universitie 
of Oxon in answer to a former Order of this Committee directed to 
them, wherein they are required to examyne the matter both as to 
the delinquencie and absence of Mr. Coventrie Fellow of Alsoules 
Colledg in Oxon: This Committee doe adjudg upon debate thereof 
that the Fellowship of the said Mr. Coven trie in Alsoules Colledg 
aforesaid is voyd. 

July llth, 1650. 

(P. 323.) At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of 

Oxon. 

Mr. Severne, Whereas information is given to this Committee that Mr. Tho: 
Severn, Student of Christ Church in Oxon, was among other persons 
Ordered by this Committee to be removed from the said Colledg 
and expelled the Universitie for his not submitting to the authoritie 
of Parliament in the Visitation of that Universitie, and yet is 
actually possest of his said Student's place notwithstanding the 
aforesaid Order : This Committee having perused their said Order 
of expulsion of the 15th of May, 1648, whereby it appeares to be 
true according to the said information : It is Ordered : That the 
Visitors of the said Universitie doe forthwith remove the said Mr. 
Severn accordingly : And it is further Ordered that Mr. Benjamen 
Maudit, student in Exeter Colledge Oxon, be and hereby is re- 
cornended to the Visitors of the said Universitie to be put into the 
said Student's place, with the enjoyment of all rights, profitts. privi- 
ledges, and emoluments belonging thereunto: And it is likewise 
further Ordered, That the Visitors doe revive the said Order of 
the 1 5th of May. 1048, and prosecute it effectually against all that 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 297 

are mentioned therein, if any yet doe actually hold their places in July H, 1650. 
the said Colledge : And that they give an accompt thereof to this 
Committee on this day 3 weekes peremptorily: 

JAMES CHALONER. 

[By the Visitors.] 

Whereas Mr. Arnold, Fellow of Merton Colledge in Oxon, pre- July 12, 1650. 
ferred a Petition to us that hee might have senioritie of some in 
the said Colledg according to former Orders of the Visitors : It is 
Ordered: That the matter be referred to the Delegates of the Uni- 
versitie to heare and determine as they shall see cause : 

[Letter from the Visitors.] 

To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation 

Cii TT * c r\ July 18, 1650. 

of the Uni versitie of Oxon. A Return to 

TIT i ,. i A T i the Committee 

Jn obedience to an Order of the 30th of May, 1650, directed to concerning 

us the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, togeather with a Peti- New Coll> 
tion thereunto annexed, having examined the matter of fact in the 
said Petition, and fully heard the parties concerned therein, doe 
humbly certifie as followeth: 

1. It appeares that in the yeare 1646 there was a lease of the 
Rectorie of Marshfeild, in the county of Gloucester, in the hands 
of Mr. Viner under a lease from New Colledg, at which tyme there 
was two yeares of that lease in being. 

2. It appeares that Mr. Bramley was imployed by some of the 
inhabitants of the said towne to treat with Dr. Pink, then Warden 
of New Colledge, for a new lease of the said Rectorie for the 
benefite of the towne, and that Dr. Pink did by his letter dated 
7 Sept. 1646, directed to Mr. Bramley, promise to give his consent 
to the making a lease to Mr. Bramley, with a lymitation to re- 
maine to his successor Vicars: and did also signifie that 15 of the 
Fellowes (being all that were then at home) had given also their 
consent, as by the said letter, a copie whereof is hereunto annexed, 
more fully appeares; 

CAMDi SOC. 2 Q 



298 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

July 18, 1650. 3. It further appeares, that in the yeare 1646, or 1647, Mr. 
Giles Aleworth tooke a lease of the said Rectorie of Marshfeild of 
the Warden and Fellowes of New Colledge, Dr. Stringer being 
then Warden : the certaine date of which lease will appeare by the 
lease to be produced by Mr. Ayleworth before this honorable Com- 
(P. 316.) mittee, when hee shall be summoned to attend them. And the 
said lease, as we conceave, was made after the Order of restraint. 

4. That the said Mr. Ayleworth paid to the Colledge upon taking 
the said lease bonafide a valuable consideration for the same. 

5. It appeares also that the said Mr. Giles Ayleworth hath ever 
since the taking of the said lease paid to the Colledg the rents of 
money and corne reserved and payable thereupon, and that the 
present Warden and Fellowes of that Colledge have receaved and 
accepted of the same. 

6. Lastly it appeares the Vicarage of Marshfeild is worth per annum 
601. or thereabouts : All which wee humbly submitt to this honorable 
Committee, having according to your Order appoynted the parties 
to attend your Honors on Thursday the 15th of the month of August, 
1650, to receaveyour further pleasure. 

[Letter from the Visitors.] 

July 24, 1650. To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation of the 

Universitie of Oxon. 

Christ Church Whereas your Order of the 18th of this instant July makes men- 
lleturn: Dr. . _ ~ , i -i-rr 

Wall. tion or a lormer Order ot the fourth ot this instant month: Wee 

humbly certifie that the first Order never came to our hands. Con- 
cerning Dr. Wall's houlding of two Ecclesiasticall Livings wee 
retourne his resignation of one: Concerning his affections to the 
Parliament, wee retourne his answere under his owne hand, and 
have beene credibly informed of his affection to the Parliament. 

fP 317} 
July 24, 1650. It is this day thought fitt and necessary : That the new Statute 

cellor. devolving all power and authoritie of the Chancellor on the Vice 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 299 

Chancellor during the vacancie of a Chancellor, be confirmed, and July 24,1650. 
is accordingly by us hereby confirmed and referred to the Convo- 
cation, to be also confirmed by that House. a 

Resolved : That [John] Cawley be elected into the next voyd July 29, 1650. 
Fellow's place in Magdalen Colledge in the guift of the Visitors : ^ppietret* 1 
And William Appletree (sonne to Mr. Appletree, one of the Magd. Coil. 
Visitors) into the next Demye's place there, in the guift of the 
Visitors. 

Resolved : That the businesse proposed to us by the Principle of Principle of 
Jesus Colledge (concerning the state of the Colledge) be heard at 
our next sitting. 

Whereas" John" Freind, Fellow of New Colledge, claymes a divi- July 29, 1650. 
dent in Balioll Colledge, which became due to him while hee ^^ 
was Fellow of Baliol Colledge: Wee having receaved full satis- Coll. 
faction that it of right belongs to him : and having directed our 
Order to the Master of the Colledge (or in his absence to the Vice 
Gerent) to pay the same, who having receaved the said Order yet 
have not paid the divident to the said Mr. Freind : Upon complaint 
whereof it is againe Ordered : That the Master of the said Colledge or 
the Vice Gerent doe without delay e pay the said dues to Mr. Freind : 
And further, That they answere the contempt of our former Order 
in not paying the same according to the said Order. 

Upon good and sufficient testemony of the desert of [John] Jul 7 29 > 165 - 
Cawley, Demy of Magdalen Colledge > Oxon, this day presented Cawley, Magd. 
to the Visitors : It is therefore Ordered that the deserts of the said 
[John] Cawley be considered, and that he be chosen into the next 
voyd fellowshipp in the said Colledge falling in the guift and power 
of the said Visitors. b 

a " This Order of the Visitors was published in Convocation and approved of by 
their unanimous consent." (Reg. Conv. T. July 21, 1650.) 
b Cawley became a Fellow of All Souls in 1651. 



300 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Honorable the Comittee for Kegulating the Universitie 
of Oxon : 

Chnst Church. j n pursuance of an Order of this honorable Committee (dated 

lieturntothe July 1 1th instant, which wee receaved not till Wednesday last), 

Committee. WeQ haye removed Mr Seaverne, Student of Christ Chureh, out of 

his place, and voted Mr. Maudit, of Exeter Colledge, into his place 

according to your Order : And have further proceeded to remove 

severall other persons in the catalogue of the 15th of May, 1648, 

according to your said Order. 

July 31, 1650. Ordered: That the Students lately elected into Christ Church 

cS^Church ( vizt ' ^ u ^ 29ta ) ^ e examined by the Censors of the Colledge: 

And that their sufficiencie be reported to the Visitors. 

Principle of Ordered : That the Principall of Jesus Colledge have a coppie of 
A pp. the Articles exhibited against him, and thathee give in his answere 

to them the next sitting of the Visitors. 

(P. 324.) At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 
Aug. 1, 1650. 

Mr. Sevemeof Upon reading the Petition of Thomas Severne, Master of Arts 
Ch: Ch: an( j Student of Christ Church in Oxon hereunto annext: It is 

Ordered : That the Visitors of the said Universitie consider of the 
same, and enquire whether the said Mr. Severne hath submitted to 
the authoritie of Parliament in the Visitation, and continued upon 
that accompt in his Student's place in Christ Church since the Order 
of this Committee of the 15th of May for expulsion of Non-sub- 
mitters : And if any person hath any thing to say as to this busi- 
nesse, the Visitors are to heare them, and they are to make Retourne 
hereof to this Committee on this day 3 weeks peremptorily. 

(P. 319.) Aug: 1st: 1650. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie of Oxon: 
Mr. Markham. Upon the Petition of Mr. Francis Markham, Student at Christ 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 301 

Church in Oxon, a copy whereof is annext, it appearing to this Aug. 1, 1650. 

Committee upon perusuall and examination of all their Orders of 

expulcion for non-submission to the authoritie of Parliament, that 

the said Mr. Markham was returned as a Non-submitter, but crost 

out and defaced by the Visitors in their list of Aug: 1 st : 1648 : and 

that the said Markham haveing ever since Aug: 1648, lived in the 

said Colledg, and conformed to all Orders of Parliament and the 

rules and Orders of the Universitie, and of the said Colledge as is 

suggested, yet nevertheless is by the said Visitors lately removed: 

of which this Committee requires the Visitors to give an accompt to 

this Committee on this day sennight. 

MILES CORBET. 

[By the Visitor?.] 

A Return to the said Committee upon the said Order. 
Aug: 6: 1650. 

According to your Order of the First of Aug: concerning Mr. Mr. Markham, 
Francis Markham, Student of Christ Church, Oxon: Wee humbly Christ Church ' 
certefy and return this accompt: That although we did not find 
the said Mr. Markham in the list of the 15 th : of May, 1648, men- 
tioned in your Order of the 11 th : July, 1650 : Yet in consideration p a 177 
of his answere given in to the Visitors July 14 th : 1648 (which we 
send herewith), and your Order of the 1 st : of Aug 1648: We pro- 
ceeded upon the said latter Order for his remouvall out of the said 
Colledg. a 

Upon the consideration of the present debts of Balioll Colledg in Aug. 6, 1650. 
Oxon: It is ordered by the Visitors of the said Universitie : That no Balioll Coll. 
more Fellowes be put into the old Foundation of the said Colledg 
until further Order. 

a A very lame answer. The Visitors are caught tripping, for they do not explain 
the delay of nearly two years. If Markham's name does not appear (as the Visitors 
are right in saying) in the list sent to them by the Committee on May 15, 1648, 
that might excuse them for not expelling him then; but why expel him so long 
afterwards? 



302 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Aug. 6, 1650. Whereas many Articles of foule and scandalouse nature have beene 

Aug!6, 1650. ex ^ibited against Mr. Poore, of Balioll Colledg, and fully proved 

Mr. Poore of against him before the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon: It is 

therefore Ordered : That the said Mr. Poore shall be removed not 

only from his Fellowship in the said Colledg, but also expelled from 

this Universitie: And the said Mr. Poore is required to yeild 

obedience to this Order, and forthwith to remove accordingly. 

Aug.6,l6oO. j n ^g cause depending before the Visitors of this Universitie 
' betweene the Warden of New Colledge and the Fellowes of the 
said Colledge : 1st. Whether the Warden had sole power of himselfe 
to scoure [score] the said Fellowes for their absence from prayers 
in the said Colledge: It is thought fitt that the said question be not 
presently determined: But whereas the said Fellowes have made 
themselves judges in their owne cause by taking off the scoure 
which, for their absence from prayers, was laid upon them by the 
said Warden : It is ordered and thought fitt that the said scoure 
shall remaine and continue upon them. 

Aug. 8, 1650. rp hat w h ereas t h ere was an Order made the 1 9th of October, 1 649. 
Universitie 

Coll. upon the consideration of the debts of Universitie Colledge, that 

three Fellowships should continue voyd for the payment thereof: It 
is ordered upon the Petition of S r Cooper, Batchelor: That the 
Fellowes of the said Societie shall (upon the next sitting of the 
Visitors), bring before them a perfect list of such debts of the said 
Colledge and of the profitts of the said Fellowshipps that have 
yssued out, or ought to have beene paid upon the Visitors' said 
Order, for the ends aforesaid, and show cause why the said Order 
should not be discharged. 

(P. 321.) It is this day ordered by the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon: 
That Dr - Roberts Principall of Jesus Colledg, do bring in unto 
them all his accompts of receipts and disbursements which hath 
properly appertayned to the said Colledge since his executing the 
place of Principall untill this day: And the said Principall is 
hereby required to bring in the said accomptj clearely stated, 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 303 

before the Visitors of this Universitie, upon the Nyneteenth day of Aug. 8th, 1650. 
this month. 

It is ordered by the Visitors of this Universitie of Oxon: That in Aug. 8th, 1650. 
regard there hath beene a great neglect in chusing officers into 
Jesus Colledg for maintayning the government of the said Col jp or O ffi cers O f 
ledge: The Principall and Fellowes of the said Colledge are Jesus Colled ge. 
hereby required to consult and chuse all such officers as are 
thought fitt and necessary to beare office in the said Colledg to 
morrow, being the Nynth of August instant, in the afternoone, 
and to maintaine the same according to the Statutes and customes 
of the said House. 

Upon the Petition of Mr. Henry Monday, late Postmaster of Aug-.'sth, 1650. 
Merton Colledge, for his arrears alledged as due unto him, for the of Morton ^' 
space of 4 years from the said Colledge : It is this day Ordered by Colledge. 
the Visitors of this Universitie: That the case and Petition of the 
said Henry Monday be referred to the Warden and Fellowes of 
Merton Colledge aforesaid to consider of his said Petition, and 
either to satisfie his arreares soe alledged to be due unto him, or to 
report the same to the Visitors aforesaid on Monday com 3 weekes, 
or sooner if they soe thinke fitt. 

Upon good and sufficient reasons this day presented to the (P. 322.) 
Visitors against the admission of some lately elected into Universitie Aug. 8th, 1650. 
Colledge: It is this day Ordered: That the Master and Fellowes of Mr. Basnett. 
the said Colledg are hereby inhibited to admitt Mr. Fidoe, lately 

elected Fellow, as also Basnett, elected Scholar, into the said 

Colledg till further order. 

Upon full hearing and debate of the Articles of misdemeanor Aug. 8th, 1650. 
exhibited against Mr. Parsons, b Fellow of Corpus Christi Colledge, M ^arsons, 

See below, where the questions connected with Jesus College and its Principal 
are discussed. 

The Visitors' method 'of. dealing with Mr. Parsons, who had been appointed a 
Fellow by them, did not answer. His way of spending his leave of absence in Lon- 



304 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Aug. 8th, 1C60. before the Visitors of this Universitie: It is ordered and thought 
fitt : That the said Mr. Parsons be sharply reproved and admonished 
by the said Visitors; (which was donne accordingly): And that after 
the same hee be fully discharged of the accusations against him : 
And it is further Ordered (to the removing all animosities and cause 
of difference in the said Colledge) : That the said Mr. Parsons, for 
the space of two whole yeares, have hereby libertie to absent him- 
self from the said Colledg, and during the said tyme is to have and 
enjoy the whole benifite of his said Fellowship as if hee were 
present in the said Colledg. 

Aug. 8, 1650. 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie 
of Oxon. 

Mr. Busby, Upon reading the Petition of John Busby, late Student of 

' Christ Church in Oxon, this Committee having caused their Order 

of expulsion of 15th of May 1648 to be searcht and perused, and 
not finding the said Busby in that list which the Order of this 
Committee of the llth of July last requires and directs them only 
to prosecuit effectually: It is. therefore Ordered: That the said 
Visitors certifie the cause of his removall from his said Student's 
place to this Committee on this clay seavennight. 

Order of Retourne. 

To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation of 
the Universitie of Oxon. 

(P. 325.) According to your Order of the First of August, 1650, concern- 

Aug. 12, 1650. i n g ]y/[ r Severne of Christ Church in Oxon, wee humbly certifie 
]\ir * 



Ch: Ch: that Mr. Severne gave in his Answere to us the Visitors of the 

don was soon reported to them as "loose, disorderly, and scandalous;" on which 
he is ordered to return to College. Still his absence is so much desired there, that 
the ministrations he had performed at Twyford Church for a quarter of a year are 
extended for half a year longer. He might do, it seems, for a country living. 



THE VISITORS* REGISTER. 305 

said Universitie the Fourth of May, 1648, which Answere wee Aug. 12 165 - 
send herewith. That this Answere wee retourned to this honor- 
able Committee the First of August following, and wee doe not 
find in our books that his name was retourned in the list of the 
15th of May, 1648. But in pursuance of your Orders of llth 
July, 1650, and the 16 of November, 1648, wee proceeded to the 
removall of him from his place, all which wee humbly submitt. a 

[Letter from the Visitors.] 

To the Right Honorable Committee for Reformation of the Aug. 12, 1650. 
Universitie of Oxon. Mf; 5 usb J'> 

v^nt On ; 

According to your Order of the 8th of this instant August, con- 
cerning Mr. John Busby, late Student of Christ Church in Oxon, 
wee humbly certifie that wee the Visitors of the said Universitie 
proceeded to his removall from his Student's place upon your Order 
of the First of Aug. 1648, and not upon your Order of 15 May, 
1648; all which wee humbly submitt: 

Whereas S r Edes and S r Whitchcott have procured them- ( Pt 326 -) 
selves' 5 to be admitted into Lincolne Colledg without the Orders or s^Edes'and 

a Mr. Severne's case is similar to those of Markham and Busby, all of Christchurch, 
and, with those cases and others, forms part of the complaint made by the Visitors 
to the London Committee ( see below). But in the case of Severne the Visitors give as 
a reason for suddenly obeying orders which they had so long supposed they were not 
to obey, that his behaviour was " both malignant and scandalous." Yet in spite of 
this, on his " bare appeal," the Committee had restored him. It was clear that an 
explosion must soon follow such a quarrel, as it did in a very few months. 

b By Order of the London Committee. As the quarrel proceeds, it is evident that 
the Visitors have more and more right to complain, and that the London Committee 
have no justification for their interference, which in this case is mischievous and 
scandalous. The Visitors act with spirit; refuse to admit these two men; "suspend 
their admission," when the Order is repeated; and bring their case as an unanswer- 
able charge against the Committee when the actual rupture takes place. 

These men were from Cambridge, as also two others of the new Fellows of 
Lincoln, Adlard and Hitchcock, probably persons whose absence from that University 
was desirable. Wood agrees with the Visitors that these appointments had been 
most improper in every sense, and that the four men, " by a faction they bred, and 
with an old and false Rector, fostered, did almost subvert that House;" (Annals.) 

CAMD. SOC 2 R 



306 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Aug. 14, 1650. approbation of the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, or without 

Str hitCh " the electlon ofthe Rector and Fellowes of the said Colledg: Wee 

Lincolne Coll. doe hereby declare them to be noe Fellowes of Lincolne Colledg, 

and not to have right to any profitts or priviledges of Fellowes in 

the said Colledg, whereof wee desire the Rector and Fellowes to 

take notice : 

Off! 8 ' 14 ' 165 Whereas upon an Order graunted by the Visitors of this Uni- 
Jesus Coll. versitie of Oxon, that the Principall and Fellowes of Jesus Colledg 
should elect all necessary officers for carrying on the Government of 
that Colledge, and that according to the said Order they proceeded 
to an election, wherein there was some difference betweene the said 
Principall and Fellowes, which being brought before the Visitors, 
upon full hearing thereof it is Ordered : That the election lately 
made by the said Fellowes of Jesus Colledge shall stand, and is 
hereby confirmed. And it is further Ordered : That whereas Mr. 
Jenkin Lloyd (elected Bursar of the said Colledge) desiring an 
assistant in executing the said office, his desire therein be graunted. 



( p - 3 27.) Aug. 15th, 1650. 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universities. 

Ordered : That all Orders that shall be made by the Visitors of 
Oxon, and sent to this Committee, shall be signed by any five or 
more of the said Visitors that are present at the makeing of such 
Orders. a FRAN: Rous. 



a Five was the number originally appointed to be a quorum in May, 1647, so that 
the Committee were perfectly right in insisting on that number of signatures. It 
is not surprising that some should absent themselves under the pressure of the 
differences now developing with the Committee; and it is not improbable that where 
so many of the Visitors' Orders are given without signatures, the quorum had not 
been always present, and thus that some of their acts had been illegal. The Orders 
which follow are much more frequently signed after this, or the presence of the 
quorum notified. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 307 

[By the Visitors."] 

Aug. 24th, 1650. ^ -'' 165 - 

Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Rogers,* Pro- Vice-Chan. Collonel Kelsey. 

S r Nath. Brent. Mr. Appletree. 

Mr. Draper. 

Resolved : That the former Order of the Visitors concerning the 
removeall of divers Students of Christ Church Colledge in Oxon 
(that were lately removed by the said Visitors) be continued untill 
further Order. 

Resolved : That the Order of the Committee for re-establishing 
the aforesaid Students be suspended till the matter of scandall 
brought against them be fully heard and examined by the said 
Visitors. 

Whereas a Petition was this day preferred to us the Visitors of ( p - 328 
this Universitie of Oxon, by John Hill, Robert Powell, Daniell 
Harford, Thomas Millington, Peter Pett, and Edmund Scroope, Alsoules. 
Fellowes of Alsoules Colledge, complayning that they are deprived 
of the priviledges and profitts due to them equally as to other 
Masters of Arts in their Colledge : It is this day Ordered : That the 
persons above named (as also Mr. Smithsby and Mr. King, Fellowes 
of the said Colledge) shall henceforth receave the same profitts and 
priviledges as other Masters of Arts in the same Colledge, in respect 
of dividents in the Colledge or otherwise : 
Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Rogers, Pro- Vice- Chancellor. Dr. Harris. 

Colonell Scroope. Mr. Appletree. 

Colonell Kelsey. Mr. Draper. 

a Dr. Rogers did the duty of Vice-Chancellor during the interval between Dr. 
Reynolds' and Dr. Greenwood's tenure of the office, the latter of which began on 
Oct. 12, 1650. Upon Dr. Reynolds, as Vice-Chancellor, had been conferred by the 
Visitors " the power and authority of Chancellor," on July 24. Perhaps this is why 
he was so soon superseded by the London Committee; but he was already in disgrace 
for not having taken the " Engagement." 



308 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Sept. 19, 1650. 

(P. 329.) 
Certificate 
concerning 
S r Edes and 
S r Which- 
cott. 



[Letter from the Visitors to the Committee.] 

Honored Sirs, 

Wee the Visitors of Oxon are bould to make this representation 
of a businesse that concernes Lincolne Colledge in Oxon. It ap- 
peares S r Edes and S r Whichcott procured Orders for Fellow- 
ships in Lincolne Colledge, but were opposed by the Fellowes that 
knew Edes to be infamous in both Universities, and were very 
suspitiouse of Whichcott. Since their being in the Colledge their 
lives have been scandalouse and of dangerouse influence to youth, 
as honest men of that House doe testifie. Wee knowing likewise 
that they never had any vote or approbation of us the Visitors of 
Oxon (as all other Fellowes have had [and] though voted above and 
by the direction of Parliament, ought to have) we declared them, Aug. 
4th, 1650, noe Fellowes. Since which tyme, before a representa- 
tion could be made of the businesse or their lives to the honorable 
Committee, they procured another Order to be admitted, but the 
Societie suspended the admission of them, they being scandalous, as 
sufficiently appeares by the annexed prooffes made before the Dele- 
gates, Sept. 19th, 1650. All which being considered, wee cannot 
but adhere to our former votes concerning them, and have further 
Ordered: That the Rector and Fellowes shall not admitt them till 
they cleare themselves of these things which are proved against 
them. And it is humbly desired not only by the Societie but by 
us the Visitors and Delegates, that these men without a full clearing 
of themselves may not be thrust upon the Colledge to the ruine 
and dishonor of it, and to the discoraging of honest men there and 
in other houses, and the great dishonor and scandall of the Visitors. 



Sept. 19, 1650. Whereas divers things of scandalouse nature have beene exhibited 
s'wMtch* and P roved against S r Edes and S r Whichcott, Batchelors of 
t-ott. Arts, (before the Delegates of the Universitie) : It is therefore 

resolved by the Visitors that they shall not be admitted into Lin- 
colne Colledge untill they procure Orders for their admission ac- 



(P. 330.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 309 

cording to the course of the Visitation. And the Rectors and ^P*- 19 > 165 - 
Fellows of the said Colledge are hereby directed to suspend their 
admission untill further Order: 
Present of the Visitors: a 

Colonell Kelsey. Dr. Rogers, Pro- Vice-Chancellor. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Apletree. 

Mr. Draper. 

Novemb: 14th, 1650. (P. 331.) 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universitie. 

Ordered by this Committee: That the Visitors of the Universitie Headsto reside 
of Oxon doe give notice to the severall and respective Masters and 
Heads of Colledges and Halls in the said Universitie : That from 
henceforth they doe personally reside in their respective Colledges 
and Halls to attend their charg according to the trust reposed in 
them : And to give an accompt to this Committee of their per- 
formance hereof with all convenient speede. b 

WALTER STRICKLAND. 

Whereas William Hobbs, Fellow of Magdalen Colledg, com- Uecemb: 12th, 
playneth that hee is abridged of his vote in the said Colledge, g obbs ot - 
although hee gave in his Answere of Submission to the Visitors Mag: Coll: 
July 20th, 1648, and enjoyed his vote in the Colledge for about a 
yeare after, as wee are informed : Wee therefore think fitt and 
Order : That the said Mr. Hobbs be restored to his vote in the said 
Colledg as aforetyme. 

Whereas Mr. Fidoe was elected Fellow of Universitie July 31th (P. 332.) 

last past, and accordingly admitted by the Master of the said Col- Dec: 12th, 

J 1650. 

a These signatures were evidently those attached to the Letter as well as to the 
Order made at the same time. 

b Wood gives no account of the prevalence of this gross abuse, the non-residence 
of Heads of Houses. Palmer's absence from All Souls on Parliamentary duty would 
appear at one time to have been recognized ; but no exception is made in his favour 
in this Order. If it were not that he was an Independent, it might be thought to 
have been levelled at him, in some connection, perhaps, with the quarrel going on 
between the Committee and the Visitors. 



310 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Dec. 12, 1650, 
vid: p: 322. 

Mr. Fidoe, of 

Universitie 

Coll: 



Dec: 12th. 
1650. 

Maudit arid 
Atherton in 
Ch. Ch. 



(P. 333.) 

Dec: 24th, 

1650. 

Certificate of 
Mr. King. 



ledge : Upon complaint made that the said Mr. Fidoe is not yet 
actually settled as Fellow in the said Colledge nor his Order entred 
into the Register Booke of tne said Colledg: Wee doe hereby 
enjoyne and order S r Norton, the present Kegister of the Colledge, 
to enter our former Order of 31th July into the Register Booke of 
that Colledge: And wee also enjoyne him and the rest of the 
Fellowes of the House to allow the said Mr. Fidoe all the profitts 
and priviledges belonging unto the said place from the date of our 
former Order of 31th July, 1650: as hee and they will Answere 
the contrary before us at their perills. 

It is Ordered: That Maudit and Atherton shall 

(according to a former election) hold the profitts and priviledges of 
Students' places in Christ Church notwithstanding any interruption 
of the same hitherto : And the ordering of the matter as to the 
disposing of the profitts of perticuler persons (absent from the Col- 
ledg) unto them is left unto the Prebendaries of the said Colledg 
such of them as are resident upon the place, who are to be attended 
accordingly. 



Present of the Visitors ; 



Collonel Kelsey. 
Dr. Rogers. 
Mr. Appletree. 



Dr. Harris. 
Mr. Diaper. 



To the Right Honorable the Committee for regulating the 

Universitie of Oxon. 

According to an Order of the honorable Committee for reforma- 
tion of the Universitie of Oxon: Wee humbly certifie the proceedings 
concerning Mr. John King, Esqr. late Auditor of Christ Church in 
Oxon, as wee find the same at large on the Register Booke, vizt: 

8 Januarij, 1648. 

This day Mr. Samuell Bedford appeared before us the Visitors 
of the Universitie of Oxon, to make his addresse to us concerning 
the Auditorship of Christ Church. By letter from the Earle of 
Manchester it was certified that the Lords' House (upon the desire 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 311 

of the Committee of both Kingdomes, July 2, 1646) did vote Mr. Dec. 24. 1G50. 
Bedford (their Scout Master Generall) Auditor of Christ Church: 
And to that end did recommend him to the Visitors : The same 
day, as appeares by Mr. House his certificate, the House of Commons 
referred the busines of the Auditorship of Christ Church to the 
Committee for the reformation of the Universitie of Oxon for 
examination thereof: In pursuance of which Order Articles were 
exhibited by Mr. Samuell Bedford against Mr. John King, Auditor 
of Christ Church, for being in armes against the Parliament, and 
divers wittnesses produced by Plaintiffe and Defendant: Upon 
hearing of both, the Committee voted Mr. King a delinquent. 

Also this day a letter to the Visitors concerning Mr. King's 
deKnquencie was brought from the Committee of Chychester. a 

Upon consideration whereof Mr. Bedford desires to be admitted (P. 334.) 
by the Visitors, and [by] the Deane and Prebendaries of Christ 
Church, to the place and office of Auditor of Christ Church afore- 
said, hee having proved Mr. King a delinquent. 

Upon which proceedings, and also for non-appearance before us 
to submitt to the Visitation, wee removed the said Mr. John King 
from his Auditorship in Christ Church : And elected Mr. Samuell 
Bedford into his place: As appeares by an Order hereunto annexed, 
vid: pa: 209. 

Present of the Visitors : 

Collonel Kelsey. Mr. Draper. 

Dr. Harris. Dr. Rogers. 

Mr. Appletree, 

Jan: 2, 1650. b 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universityes. (p. 343. 

Upon reading two Orders of this Committee of the 12th of July 
and the 20th of September, 1649, requiring the Visitors of the 

n Probably the Assessment Committee. 

b See above. A year and a half had elapsed since the former Orders had been 
issued, apparently with little effect. 



312 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jan. 2, 1650-1. Universitye of Oxon to cause Latine to be spoken in the respective 
Colled g es and Halls of that Universitye by the Fellowes, Schollers, 
and Students of the same, and jipon complaint made that the same 
is not duly executed according to the directions therein given : It 
is now Ordered : That the said Visitors be required forthwith to 
put the same into effectuall execution, and they are hereby peremp- 
torily required and enjoyned to give an accompt to this Committee 
on this day moneth of their proceedings therein. 

JAMES CHALONER. 



Jan: 14th, [By the Visitors.] 

1650. 

(V. 324.) Whereas Mr. Newhouse was formerly chosen Register to the 
Visitors, who doth for the most part reside in London attending 
upon his Master, and cannot attend the Visitation : And for that 
Raphe Austen hath constantly waited on us in the worke of the 
Visitation neere three yeares togeather: Wee therefore Order: 
That the said Raphe Austen shall from henceforth be Register to 
us, and have the fees for Orders that yssue forth from tyme totyme. 

Jan: 14th, Upon consideration of the great paines of our Register in attend- 
ance, and writing Orders for all the Colledges and Halls in this 
Universitie, both those which are ymediately from the Committee 
for regulating of the Universitie, and those also made by us as 
occation is: Wee thinke fitt and Order: That the Bursar of everie 
Coiledg doe allow 2s. 6d. to the Register for everie Order that is 
brought to the Colledge from tyme to tyme, and that he sett the 
same upon the Coiledg accompt. 

Present of the Visitors : 

Lieut: Collonel Kelsey. Dr. Harris. 
Dr. Rogers. Mr. Appletree. 

Mr. Draper. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 313 

[By the Ccmmittee for Keformation of the University.] Nov. 5, 1650. 

/"D QQPC \ 

To the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon. 

Gentlemen : 

Whereas there hath beene a complaint made to the Committee Letter to the 
for Reformation of the Universityes that the carriage of many 
Schollers in the Universitye of Oxon is disorderly and loose, and 
their apparell and haire very unseemly and unfitt for the sobriety 
and decency that is requisite among persons that make profession 
of civility and learning: And it is further also made knowen, 
that there is a common practice among them to keep hounds and 
horses which have beene heretofore not usuall among schollers but 
forbidden, 11 and must needs be very prejuditiall to them by drawing 
them from their studies: Wherefore you are hereby desired and 
required to confer with Heads of Houses concerning a through 
Reformation of these abuses, and to certifie the Committee what 
hath beene done towards the effecting of the said Reformation 
before the 5th of December next. 

Your assured frend, 

HEN: DARLEY. 

Novemb. 5th, 1650, Westminster. 

Whereas S r Sterrey, S r Maund, S r Hulley, S r Pavier, S r Hurst, (P. 336.) 
and S r Willowby, Fellowes of Merton Colledge in Oxon, were Jan: 15 > 165 - 
elected Fellowes into the said Colledge Nov. 12, 1649, which s^CrJps^ 
election was also confirmed by an Order of the Committee for Fellowes of 
Regulation of the Universityes: Now upon complaint made by Merton Coll. 
them that they were not admitted according to their said election, 
neither have receaved all their profitts and emoluments belonging 
to their Fellowships from the tyme of their election : Wee therefore 
Order that they and everie one of them shall receave all the profitts, 
rights, dividends, priviledges, and advantages whatsoever, as well 
the weekly arreares for the tyme of their nonresidence betweene 

a By the ancient Statutes. 
CAMD. SOC. 2 S 



314 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

HTO 1' their election and admission, being eight shillings per weeke, and 
what sealings or other things may appeare to have fallen due within 
their tyme, as the full enjoyment of livery and other profitts, for the 
future in as full a manner as if they had beene actually admitted 
on the 1 2th day of November aforementioned. And the Subwarden 
and Fellowes of the said Colledg are hereby desired to see the same 
faithfully performed. 

Jan. 15, 1650. Whereas the Masters and Bachelors of Lincolne Colledge in 

Batehelors Oxon require the Undergraduates in the said Colledge to perform 

Colledge. the dutie of prayer in the Chappell: It is thought fitt and soe 

Ordered: That the Masters and Bachelors only shall performe that 

dutie, unlesse the Undergraduates of themselves be willing and 

desirouse to performe the said dutie. a 

(P. 337.) Whereas many articles of misdemeanor were formerly exhibited 
Jan. 15, 1650. against Mr. Parsons, Fellow of Corpus Christie Colledge, and 
of Corpus upon hearing of the matter it was Ordered : That the said Mr. 
Parsons should have libertie for absence from the Colledg for 
two yeares, and receave his allowance belonging to his Fellowship : 
And whereas now wee are informed that the said Mr. Parsons con- 
tinues in London in a very loose and disorderly manner, soe that 
if his allowance be continued to him from the Colledge in his 
absence, in all probabilitie hee will continue still in his scandalouse 
course of life : Wherefore the said Mr. Parsons is hereby required 
and commanded (within one month after the date hereof) to repaire 
to Corpus Christi Colledge and there to continue, and conforme to 
the discipline of the Colledg. 

Jan. 15, 1650. Whereas by a former Order of the llth of July, 1649, it was 

Mr. Lane's Ordered : That Josiah Lane, Batchelor of Arts, should be elected 

sonne, Corpus 

Christi 

Colledge. a That such an Order should be necessary is a burlesque commentary on the state 

of Lincoln as revealed by the Orders concerning the Cambridge intruders. (See 
above.) The youths were no longer to have the opportunity of praying publicly 
against the " dangerous influences " to which they were confessedly exposed by their 
superiors. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



31:5 



Fellow into the next Fellowship that should fall voyd in Corpus J an - 15 
Christ! Colledge : And whereas a Fellowship became voyd in the 
House about a quarter of a yeare after: Wee therefore desire 
the President and Fellowes of the said Colledg that the said S r 
Lane may receave the profitts belonging to the same Fellowship 
from th'e tyme it fell to him according to the intent and meaning 
of our former Order. But if S r Lane shall be content to quit all 
arreares to this day wee declare ourselves fully satisfied therewith. 



Present of the Visitors : 

Collonel Kelsey. 
Dr. Harris. 
Mr. Appletree. 



Dr. Eogers. 
Mr. Draper. 



Alsoules Coll. 



[Letter from the Visitors.] (P. 338.) 

Jan: 15, 1650. 

To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation of State of 
the Universityes. 

Whereas wee are required by an Order of this honorable Com- 
mittee to certifie concerning the state of Alsoules Colledge in Oxon: 
We do hereby humbly certifie That wee have endeavored to informe 
ourselves concerning the affaires and state of the House: And we 
find there is a very great necglect of the publique worship of God in 
the Chappell, and also of Scholastical Excercises that ought to be 
performed in the House from tyme to tyme : And the House (as to 
the generall discipline of it) is very much out of order, which is 
much occationed by the great necglect of the Subwarden and those 
Officers who are to manage the discipline of the Colledg, who doe 
endeavor to excuse their necglect by the absence of the Warden : 
And wee further certifie that wee finde there in the House many 
disaffected Seniors and inexperienced young men, unfitt to make 
elections or to beare office in the House, so that we conceave the 
House is not fitt to make elections of Fellowes or Officers in a 
Statutable way, yet there be divers well qualified persons who are 



316 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

^n 1 ! ' fitt thereunto : All which we leave to the consideration of this 

1650-1. 

honorable Committee. a 

Present of the Visitors : 

Collonel Kelsey. Mr. Appletree. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Draper. 

Dr. Rogers. 

(P. 339.) Whereas by information it appeares to us That Mr. Lockey, b 

Jan. 16, 1650. Student of Christ Church in Oxon, lately preached a very scandal- 

of Ch: Ch. y ouse sermon before the Universitye: It is therefore Ordered: That 

the said Mr. Lockey be suspended from preaching within the 

precincts of the Universitie : And that hee be deprived of the office 

of a Tutor, his schollars removed and placed with an orthodox, 

pious, and able scholler. And hereof the Deane and Prebendaries 

of Christ Church and all others concerned therein are to take 

notice, and to see this order put in execution. 

Jan.- 16, 1650. Whereas the Postmasters of Merton Colledge in Oxon were 
Merto^CoTl e ^ ecte ^ i nto their places contrary to authoritie of Parliament de- 
clared by an Order prohibiting elections in Colledge : It is there- 
vid. p. 169. ore Ordered : That the Postmasters hereafter mentioned shall be 
and are hereby removed from their places in Merton Colledge, and 
suspended from their profits forthwith. 

Blanke. Coles. 

Wright. Prickett. 

Ambler. Myers. 

Phillips. Stanes. 

Owen. Moore. 

Thorneton. Richmond. 



* See above; and W. of All-Souls, 203, where however the date is misprinted; 
b Lockey was a man of mark. He was Bodley's Librarian from 1660 to 1665; 



THE VISITORS' EEGISTER. 317 

[Letter from the Visitors."] Jan - \ & > 

.. :.,..: 1650-1. 

To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation of (P. 340.) 

the Universitie : Dr. Mylles. 

Whereas this honorable Committee by an Order, Jan: 2 nd last 
past, require us to certifie whether Dr. Mylles (late Prebendary of 
Christ Church) doe not yet retaine a Student's place in the said 
Colledg : We hereby certifie That the said Dr. Mylles doth as yet 
retaine a Student's place in the said House with the profitts and 
priviledges thereof.* 

["Letter from the Visitors to the London Committee.! A lette .^ * tne 

Committee: 

b May it please this honorable Committee : Jan: 17, 1650. 

Wee cannot but with sadnesse of heart take notice of some Orders 
from your selves which have proved (though we presume not 

a This consideration for a Non-submitter is another of the more agreeable inci- 
dents of the Visitation. One cannot help connecting Dean Reynolds with the 
attempt to retain in his House so many of those who would not submit formally, yet 
were willing to live quietly. Tbe London Committee were evidently determined to 
get at every case of the sort, and Reynolds himself soon followed. 

b This letter must be read along with the curt reply of the London Committee, 
which follows (p. 323), and the second letter of the Visitors on the same subject. 
The former seem to rely on the terms of the original Commission of May 1, 1647, 
which certainly made the Visitors little more than a Court of Inquiry, and left the 
executive to the Committee of Parliament. The Visitors would have done better 
to rely only on the supplementary Ordinances of August and September, 1647, 
which were issued when the powers at first granted appeared to be insufficient, and 
which threw them back on the general powers of a Visitation, which powers they 
certainly did not exceed. Still further they were told on Sept. 24 by Parliament : 
" If any shall without just cause appeal from you to us when you have passed a 
definitive sentence upon them, we shall look upon it as a contempt of a very high 
nature." (Annals, vol. ii. part ii. 517) ; and it is surprising that they do not quote 
these words. The Parliamentary Committee, exercising supreme authority accord- 
ing to the terms of the " Engagement," came to forget that they had already parted 
with so much of their power to those who were more capable of exercising it from 
being on the spot. The Visitors show equal good sense and dignity in declining to 



318 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

1650-1.' intended by you) much to the prejudice of the Keformation of the 
Universityes, which have also caused much contempt and scorne to 
be cast upon us the Visitors, they being in opposition to Orders 
made by us: Soe that if there be not a right understanding 
between us and your selves this worke of Eeformation will be 
much retarded and wee shall be much discouraged. And although 
wee have beene sylent after Orders to this purpose, yet now wee are 
constrayned to apply ourselves unto this Committee, hoping you 
will be pleased to doe us right herein. You cannot but know 
what power and authoritie the Parliament hath beene pleased to 
give to us, whereby wee are enabled to fill the places of those that 
have been removed, and also all voyd places where Colledges are 
not in a condition to make their owne elections, and that your 
Committee have from tyme to tyme declared that the power of 
putting in Fellowes and Schollers lyeth wholly in this Committee 
of Visitors and not the Committee of Parliament, who are a Com- 
mittee of Appeale, as your selves have formerly declared, and in 
perticuler did declare in the case of Dr. Hoode, Rector of Lincolne 
Colledge : And wee are ignorant that ever the Parliament have 
(P 341 ) * n anv perticuler altered our power: Only in the case of non- 
subscribing the Engagement: And therefore must make bould to 

be the mere puppets of Parliament. Governor Kelsey had infused a little military 
spirit into the body. (For the cases mentioned, see Notes on p. 305.) 

Thus far the rights on both sides. But the question between the two parties was 
really one incidental to such a revolution as had taken place: Was the Government 
safe unless every member of such an institution as Oxford University was pledged 
to its present form, viz., the Engagement ? We have seen what differences of 
opinion existed among the Visitors themselves on this point, and have noticed the 
petition of (the reformed) Convocation to be absolved from subscribing to it. The 
quarrel is a deliberate one on the part of those who are determined fco search out 
every case of favour shown to persons of doubtful allegiance. It was time that the 
two bodies should at least understand one another. The problem was solved by the 
gradual transformation of the Visitatorial body, the growing return to Academical 
habits, the order maintained by Greenwood and Owen under Cromwell's authority 
as Chancellor, and finally the gradual formation by experience of an excellent 
governor in Conant, Rector of Exeter. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 319 

clayme it as our right till the Parliament shall thinke fitt to alter Ta - 17, 
it. And soe it is that when we had formerly removed divers 
Students out of Christ Church Colledge for their delinquency and 
other scandalouse carriage, this honorable Committee was pleased 
upon their appeale to your selves (without enquiring into the 
grounds of our proceedings, or giving notice thereof that wee 
might have satisfied you of the justnesse of our doings therein) to 
restore them to their places and turne out those that were put in 
by us: And in perticuler Mr. Severne, whom wee cast out by 
direction from your selves, who did also appeare both malignant 
and scandalouse; upon his bare appeale you restored him, and re- 
moved Mr. Maudit, which wee by your Order put into his roome : 
And likewise too Fellowes of Lincolne Colledg, which for their 
scandalouse behavior were refused by the Committee of Visitors to 
put in that or any other Colledg, and were yet afterwards by your- 
selves put in, which are a burthen and greife at this day to the 
honest partie of that House. And now of late when we had put in 
one Mr..0sborne (a man everie way accomplisht both with learn- 
ing and other accomplishments fit for any preferment) into Dr. 
Wainwright's place in Alsoules Colledge, which place was in our 
power to dispose of, that Colledge being not in a way to make their 
owne elections, it being that which hath beene allowed to this 
Comittee these 3 yeares and never yet denyed us : notwithstanding 
you have beene pleased to vote our Order concerning Mr. Osborne 
to be null, and to put Mr. Brise in his roome, which doth still put 
further discouragments upon us and will render us soe contemptible 
in the eyes of this Universitie that wee shall not be able to further 
the worke of Reformation soe happily begune. And except that /p 3 ^ 2 > 
power which the Parliament hath bestowed upon us be maintayned, 
and each Committee act in their proper spheere, wee must be forced 
for tyme to come to desist this service to avoyd the scorne and 
contempt that is and will be put upon us. And therefore wee desire 
that each Committee may rightly understand their owne power, and 
act accordingly, whereby wee may be incouraged with cheareful- 



320 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jan. 17, 1650. nesse to go on in that service. But if the Parliament thinke fitt to 
take that power from us which they have conferr'd upon us wee 
shall be very well content to be spared from that troublesome 
imployment which hath beene soe much to our charg and expence 
of tyme. But hoping that these things passed from this honorable 
Committee upon misinformation and not with intent to put these 
discouragements upon us, as they have proved in the event, wee 
shall offer an expedient at present that soe Mr. Brise (who is a 
gentleman wee all respect and would be glad to accomodate him in 
any thinge that may not be to the prejudice of others) may be put 
into a Fellowship in Alsoules Colledg, and that is in the place of 
one Mr. Germy of that House, who, as wee are credibly informed by 
some members of that House, is married, and the gentleman [is] 
soe ingeniouse a as that hee will not deny it. These things being 
graunted we shall be encouraged to goe on in our imployment, and 
subscribe ourselves 

Your humble servants, 

Tho: Kelsey. Tho: Appletree. 

Kobert Harris. William Draper. 

Christopher Rogers. 
Jan: 17th, 1650. 

Jan. 17, 1650, Whereas the Committee for Reformation of the Universityes have 
(p a 343 ) m ade severall Orders concerning speaking of Latine in Colledges and 
Halls in this Universitye : And wee the Visitors have also concurred 
with them therein, and yet complaint is made that the same are 
not accordingly observed: We therefore againe require that former 
Orders in that regard be duly put in execution in everie Colledg 
and Hall in this Universitye: And command our Register to tran- 
scribe the Order of the honorable Committee (dated Jan. 2nd last 
past) for everie Colledg and Hall in the Universitye, 

a The word " ingenious " had not, in the 17th century, acquired its present sense. 
It was then synonymous with " ingenuous " or " candid." 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 321 

Whereas wee were required by an Order of the Committee for Jan. 17,1650-1. 
Regulation of the Universities to looke into the state and condi- ( p - 344< ) 
tion of Alsoules Colledge : And wee have accordingly visited the 
same, and find that it is much out of order both as to the worship 
of God in the Chappell and scholastical exercises of the House : We 
therefore Order that the Subwarden and other Officers of the House 
doe cause the exercises of the Chappell and other discipline of the 
House to be sett up and constantly and duly observed according to 
the approved Statutes of the Colledge in those cases provided, and Subwarden of 
as is consistent with the present Reformation : And as touching the 
negligence and contempts of the Subwarden and others of the 
House, wee shall take consideration thereof at our next sitting, to 
punish the same according to the quality and nature of the 
offences. 

Whereas wee lately shewM favor to S r Lane, of Corpus Christi Jan. 22th, 
Colledge, concerning his Fellowship there : And understanding that ^ 
S r Sayer (of whom we have receaved very good testimony) was his corpus Christ! 
Senior in the Colledge, and Probationer before him, wee thinke fitt Colledge. 
(that for the priviledg of one may not prejudice the other) to confer 
the same favor upon the said S r Sayer: And Order that hee be ad- 
mitted Fellow in the said Colledg actually and presently to receave 
the rights, profitts, and privileges of his Fellowship: Whereunto 
we desire the consent and concurrence of the President and Seniors 
of the Colledge. 

Wee the Visitors of the Universitye of Oxon having examined Jan. 22th, 
the charg against Mr. Brent, of Merton College in Oxon (consist- ' 
ing of many particulars), doe find upon clear testimony upon oath Merton Coll; 
(evidenced by severall persons before us, having them and the ( p - 
accused face to face), that the said Mr. Brent is guilty of many 
foule misdemeanors and scandalouse behaviour in his conversation : 
Wee therefore (according to the power put into our hands) doe 
hereby Order: That the said Mr. Brent shall be forthwith removed 
from his Fellowship and place in Merton Colledge, and expelled 

CAMD. SOC 2 T 



322 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jan. 22,1 G0-l. th e Universitje as a person not fitt to reside in a religiouse or civile 
societye : And hereof wee require the Subwarden and Fellowes of 
the said Colledge to take notice. 

Mr. French, j n regard it hath been fully proved before us that Mr. French, 
Morton GoD. ^ ft r rT -i r / i j 

Jan 22 1650 ^ e ^ ow * Merton Colledge in Oxon, is guilty or many foule misde- 

meanors in respect of excessive and immoderate drinking, and 
frequent swearing and cursing, and hath from tyme to tyme dis- 
covered a malignant spirit against the honest partie in the 
Colledge and Universitye: Wee therefore looke upon him as a 
person deserving to be expelled the Colledge: But in regard of 
his present sicknesse soe that hee cannot appeare before us to 
answer to the charg against him, wee therefore (as yet) forbeare 
to impose that penalty: Howsoever wee thinke fitt, and soe Order: 
That the said Mr. French shall be at present suspended from 
his vote in the house, and from executing any power or juris- 
diction in the Colledge untill further order. 8 

Whereas it hath beene made appeare before us that Mr. Wood, 

, io . p e ii ow o f Jd er ton Colledge, is guilty of divers miscariages and 

Wood, misdemeanors perticulerly laid open before us: Wee therefore Order 

Merton Coll: fa^ fa e ga |^ ^j r \y OO( j shalbe suspended from his commons, and 

all other profitts of the House for one weeke; And also suspended 

from being Tutor in the Colledge until further Order. b 

Jan. 22, 1659. Whereas there are severall Lectures in Merton College in Oxon 
by the bounty and goodwill of Benefactors: two called Linacer's 
Lectures, and one Divinity Lecture, the maintay nance of it given 
by one Mr. Knightley, which said Lectures have not of late beene 
duly held up in the Colledge according to the intent and meaning 
of the Founders: We therefore Order: That the Warden or Sub- 

a See above. A year and a half had elapsed since the former Orders, in refer- 
ence to French, had been issued, apparently with little effect. 

h Wood was a brother of the antiquary, who notices the case before us. 
(Annals.) 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 323 

warden of the Colledge doe cause the Lecturers of the said Lectures Jan. 22,1650-1. 
to attend their charg and imployment in Reading according to the 
perticular tymes appoynted them by the Statutes and customes of 
the said Colledge. a 

[From the Committee for the Reformation of the University Jan - 23 ' 165(X 

, -IT- . -i A Letter from 

to the Visitors.] the Committee. 

Gentlemen, (P. 356.) 

Your letter of the 17th instant hath beene read, and the con- 
tents thereof duly weighed and considered. And the power of this 
Committee hath likewise beene considered, as also their practise in 
supplying the places voyd in such Colledges as have not beene in a 
Statutable way to make elections: And finding in their power 
nothing that in their judgment doth contradict this continuall prac- 
tise of theirs, are of opinion upon the whole matter: That the Order 
of this Committee of the 2nd instant, in the case of Mr. Brice, con- 
stituted Fellow of Alsoules in the place of Dr. Wainwright, voyd 
by marriage, in regard the said Colledge was not in a capacitie to 
make elections, be submitted to, and therefore have this day 
Ordered the said Brice to be readmitted accordingly. Never thelesse 
the Committee are willing to heare you if you thinke fitt in any 
thing that shall concerne the businesse. And whereas you assert 
that you are enabled to fill the voyd places where the Colledges are 
not in a condition to make their own elections, which power of 
yours hath not beene made appeare to this Committee, they doe 
hereby give you notice that you have libertie then to produce such 
your power. In the meane tyme they hould it fitt that their former (p. 357.) 
Order made in the case of the said Brice be submitted to by you, 
who are sensible of a seeming contempt put upon you by it, but 
doe not take notice of the contempt that has beene put upon this 
Committee and the Parliament by your late contesting with the 

a The irritation produced on the Visitors by their unpleasant correspondence with 
the Committee seems to have expended itself on Merton, which continued to be 
much ' out of order; " but this is a fresh cause of quarrel. 



324 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Jan. 23,1650-1. ga id Order. This being all I have in command at present, I 

remaine 

Your affectionate frend and servant, 

JAMES CHALONER. 
Westminster, Jan. 23 th , 1650. 

[Letter from the Visitors to the Committee.] 
[It is undated.] 

T ]\ e , A ^ ere May it please this honorable Committee, 
ot the Visitors J ? ' 

a few dales We have duly weighed your answere of 23th of January last to our 

after. Letter, wherein you are pleased to require of us to make knowen our 

power concerning electing persons into places in Colledges which 
are not in a condition to make their owne elections : And having 
examined our Commission from the honorable Houses of Parliament, 
with certaine other Ordinances of Parliament likewise granted to 
us: Wee humbly conceive upon the whole matter, that full power 
is given to us by our said Commission and other Ordinances of 
Parliament to elect persons into all voyd places in any Colledg 
or Hall in this Universitie, untill the Houses be fully setled to 
make their own elections, not only where we remove any person 
for crymes or offences, but also in all other cases where their places 
are voyd or voydable according to Statutes : And wee conceave the 
honorable Committee is a Committee of an higher nature, to heare 
and determyn matters in case of Appeale only, by any person greived 
with any sentence given by us, as is cleare by full and expresse 
tearmes in the Ordinance of Parliament, May 1, 1647, and as this 
honorable Committee was pleased to declare particularly in the case 
of Dr. Hood, rector of Lincolne Colledge: By which Ordinance 
(P. 358.) of May 1, aforesaid, it is provided (as may appeare at large), that 
this honorable Committee (in case of Appeale by any person greived 
by any sentence definitive given by us) will heare and determyne 
everie such case soe brought by Appeale: Wherein it is further 
declared, that the persons named in the said Ordinance for the 
Standing Committee, or any five of them, shall sitt at such 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 325 

tymes as they shall appoynt to receave upon Appeale as aforesaid Jan. 23,1650-1. 

such matters as shall be soe brought and represented to them: 

And also to receave such matters as shall be certified to them, and 

thereupon to proceede to determyne: And likewise this honorable 

Committee was pleased to declare, Sept. 24th, 1647: That the 

Commissioners appoynted by the Ordinance of May 1, 1647, for the 

Visiting, Reforming, and Regulating the Universitie of Oxon may 

enquire of, heare, and determyne, all and everie cryme and crymes, 

offences, abuses, disorders, and all other matters whatsoever, which 

by the lawes and Statutes of this Realme, or by the right establisht 

customes or Statutes of the said Universitie, or of the Colledges 

and Halls, may lawfully be enquired of, heard, and determined, in 

the course and way of Visitation of the said Universitie: And that 

they may proceede to all intents and purposes even to the passing 

a definitive sentence upon any of the said Governors, Professors, 

Masters, Schollers, Graduates, Fellowes, Members, and Officers of 

the said Universitie, and according as by the said lawes, Statutes, 

and customes, or any of them, any other Visitors by any authoritie 

whatever appoynted might proceede. 

And further: It appeares by an Ordinance of Parliament, Aprill 
21,1 648 : That the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon (upon non- 
appearance or non-submission of the Members of the Uiiiversitie) 
shall suspend at present and certifie the Committee of Lords and 
Commons for Regulation of the Universitie : And upon Certificate (P- 359.) 
againe from the said Committee, the Visitors shall remove and 
deprive them from their places in their respective Colledges, and 
with the Heads of Houses shall put others in their roomes. 

It also appeares by the Ordinance of May 1, 1647: That the 
Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, or any five or more of them, 
shall visite the Universite, and enquire of, heare, and determyne, 
all and everie crymes, offences, abuses, disorders, and all other 
matters whatsoever, which by the lawes and Statutes are to be 
enquired of, heard, and determined, in course and way of Visitation 
of the Universitye : And that they may and shall proceede to all 



326 THE VISITORS' KEGISTER. 

Jan. 23,1650-1. intents and purposes as, and according as (by the said lawes, 
Statutes, and customes, or by any of them) any other Visitors by 
any authoritie whatsoever appoynted might proceede respectively : 
And shall require of those who refuse to take the solemne Legue 
and Covenant and Negative Oath : And of such as oppose the exe- 
cution of the Ordinances of Parliament concerning discipline and 
Directorie : And of those that have beene in armes against the Par- 
liament : And shall have power to examyne and consider of all such 
oathes as are injoyned by the Statutes of the said Universitie or 
Colledges and Halls, and shall consider of and examyne the Statutes 
of Colledges, and certifie the same. 

It further appeares also by our Commission from the honorable 
House of Parliament (a copie whereof wee have sent herewith): That 
there is given to us, or any five or more of us, full power and 
authoritie to visite the Colledges and Halls in the said Universitye, 
and by all good wayes and meanes to heare and determyne all and 
everie cryme and crymes, offences, abuses, disorders, and other 
matters whatsover, which by the lawes and Statutes of this liealme, 
or by the customes and Statutes of the said Universitie rightly 
established, lawfully may and ought to be enquired of, heard, and 
determined, in the course and way of Visitation of the said 
Universitie. 

Wherein it is further sett forth That the said Visitors, or any 
five or more of them, are to proceede to all intents and pur- 
(P. 360.) poses, even to the passing of a definitive sentence upon all or 
any of the said Governors, Masters, Professors, Fellowes, Graduates, 
Students, Schollers, Members, and Ofl&cers for all and everie cryme 
and crymes in like manner and according as (by the said lawes, 
Statutes, and customes, or by any of them) any other Visitors by 
any authoritie whatsoever appoynted might proceede respectively. 

By all which wee humbly conceave, that it appeares, as well by 
clearc and explicite tearmes as by necessary consequence and de- 
duction from generall words: That expulsions, elections, hearing 
and determining of matters for well ordering of the Universitie, 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 327 

are wholly in our hands by the aforesaid Ordinances and Commis- Jan. 23,1 C50-1 
sion : And that such things come before this honorable Committee 

O 

by way of Appeale only : All which power was left unto us, and 
exercised by us from the beginning of the Visitation untill of late 
tyme, without any contradiction : And this honorable Committee 
was then pleased, upon the motion of any person, to give them a 
letter of recommendation to us for the election of such person, and 
were never wont to elect any person, but left that wholly to us. 
And we humbly conceave that it was a main inducement to the 
honorable Houses of Parliament to give us soe large a Commission 
in regard wee that are here resident in the Universitie cannot but 
know the state and condition of the Colledges, and fitnesse of persons 
to be elected, rather than any that live remote from the place. 

And besides what hath beene said, if we looke backe unto presidents 
[precedents] of former Visitors, wee doubt not to make it clearely 
appearethat they have had the authentic given them (and accordingly 
acted by it) which wee here speake of in respect of elections ; and 
the very like case fell out (not long since) in Trinity Colledge in 
Oxon, in the election of u Fellow into the House in the roome of one 
married. The tyme of electing another being elapsed, and soe out (P. 361.) 
of the hands of the President and Fellows, the Visitor of the 
Colledg chose one into the place of the partie married, which elec- 
tion was firme and allowed. 

Xow, therefore, our Commission and other Ordinances being 
expresse, that wee have the like power and authoritie as any other 
Visitor or Visitors whatsoever formerly have had, we humbly con- 
ceive that in electing Mr. Osbourne into Dr. Wainewright's place in 
Alsoules, we did therein according to our Commission, and hope 
that this honorable Committee will not make voyd that our election, 
soe much to the prejudice of tjje yong man, who is well deserving, 
not only in respect of qualifications but also in that hee hath beene 
very serviceable to the Parliament : And concerning Mr. Brice, hee 
was not removed by us, as your letter seemes to intimate, where it 
is said that Mr. Brice shall be readmitted. 



328 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



Jan. 23,1 650-1. Soe that this honorable Committee was misinformed concerning 
us in that perticuler. 

Thus, having represented our Commission and authoritie by which 
wee act in the Visitation of the Universitie, wee humbly leave the 
same to your honors' consideration. 



(P. 3i8.) 
Merton Coll. 



(P. 349.) 

Postmasters 
of Merton. 



Feb. 13th, 1650. 
Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universityes. 

Upon reading the Petition of S r Nathaniell Brent, a Knight, 
Warden of Merton Colledge in Oxon, who upon complaint ex- 
hibited certaine causes of greivance in the late Visitation of that 
Colledge : As the undue putting in of a Fellow into that Colledge 
contrary to Statute without necessitie, and against an expresse 
Order of this Committee, made in March last, as also in the breach 
of an auncient and laudable custome continued in that Colledge in 
the nomination of Postmasters, both tending to the subversion of 
the Government of that Colledge : It is Ordered : That the Visitors 
of the Universitie of Oxon be acquainted herewith, who are required 
to give an accompt hereof to this Committee concerning their pro- 
ceedings in those perticulers in that Colledge upon Thursday fort- 
night after Easter next peremptorily, when this Committee will 
heare and determine the said cause. And till such hearing before 
this Committee all proceedings of the said Visitors as to that Col- 
ledge be suspended. 

JAMES CHALONER. 



a This commences the last phase of Sir Nathaniel Brent's career. He had not 
signed as Visitor since August, and does not sign again for several months, till 
Oct. 1, 1651. Prohably he had sided with th London Committee in the previous 
quarrel; and whether Merton deserved the wrath of his colleagues or not, he could 
go on no longer with them. He soon after had to resign the Wardenship on account 
of an Order forbidding Pluralities. He died in 1652, aged 79, having seen many 
violent changes, both in his country and University, and taken a considerable part 
in them, 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



329 



[Certificate.] 

To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation of the 

Universities. 



(P. 347.) 

March 5th, 
1650-1. 

Certificate 
concerning 
Whereas by an Order of this honorable Committee, dated Feb. Ch: Ch: men. 

17th, 1650, It was Ordered: That the Visitors of the Universitie of 
Oxon, or any two of them, cause notice to be left at the chambers 
of the Students of Christ Church respectively, whose names are 
mentioned in the said Order, that in case they make it not appeare 
to this Committee on the 13th of this instant March, peremptorily, 
that they have subscribed the Engagement according to Act of 
Parliament, that then the Committee will nominate others in their 
places. Wee hereby certifie concerning the said persons, that 





ward 


have subscribed 


Mr. 


Dyer 

Cowes 


the Ingagement. 


Mr. 


Grisley 
Castilian 


have notice of 
the said Order. 




Westley 




C Helin 




Waring 




| Cotton 




Mr.< 


Powell 


are absent upon 




Croydon 


leave. 




Dr. Maplet 






^ Speede ' 






Wood 


are in the Service 


Mr 






ivir. 


Skinner 


of Ireland. 



Mr. 



Holloway 
Thornebery 
Towers 
Dr. Mead 


are 
removed 
long 
since 


Dr. Bennett 
Reading 
Chilmead 


upon 

Statut- 
able 


Bailye 
Hancocke. 


grounds 
and 


Hall 


others 


Westfeild 


in their 


Skinner 


places. 



Mr. Quine is not compos mentis. 



( p - 348 -) 
2Ctb> 



Ordered by the Visitors that Mr. Washington and Mr. Tonge, 
Fellowes of Universitie Colledge, shall bring in a profitt accompt 
of the debts of the Colledge and what hath beene already paid, universitye 
and what is yet to be paid, and that they call to assist them Coll: 

CAMD. SOCi 2 U 



330 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Mar. 20, herein Mr. Gale and Mr. Jeninges, Fellowes of the said House : 
And this they are required to bring before us on this day seanight, 
(being Thursday) at nyne of the clocke in the forenoone in the 
Master's Lodgings in Universitie Colledge aforesaid. 

March 22th, Whereas it hath beene made appeare to the Visitors that there is 
i ft^in 

not in Wadham Colledge (to whom in course it belongs to chuse 
Proctor in r t -r> i - 

Wadham Coll: one oi the Proctors for the yeare next ensuing) any Member who 

according to their former Orders is regularly capable of that office, 
and of such full standing as the Statutes dee require. The Visitors 
therefore (considering the present necessitie) doe give their consent 
that the election of Mr. Lee into that office lately made by the 
Colledge be dispensed with, though he be not of such full standing 
as the Statutes of the Universitye doe require. And they doe 
hereby Order that the said Mr. Lee shall have and execute the full 
power and authoritie belonging to that office in any case what- 
soever: 8 



March 26, 
1651. 

(P. 349.) 

Debts of 

Universitye 

Coll. 



[March 25, 1650-1 .] b 

Upon debate of the businesse concerning, the debts of Universitie 
Colledge: It is Ordered: That the Colledge doe make their 
accompts profitt with all their creditors: that soe it may appeare 
clearely what hath beene paid since their last accompt, and what is 
due and owing at present. And that they bring the same accompte 

a Lee was a rigid Nonconformist. He lived on his estate at Bicester after the 
Restoration, and " sometimes kept Conventicles." In 1686 he emigrated to New 
England, but returning in 1691 was taken captive by a French Privateer, and died, 
says Wood, of a broken heart; but at any rate he was a sufficiently old man. 

b Referring to the end of the year now just concluded, Wood makes the following 
remark: " Independency increasing very much in London it was aimed at by the 
Grandees there that it should take rooting and increase in the University, and so 
consequently dilate itself through the nation." (Annals.) To the six Ministers 
who had hitherto taken the preaching at St. Mary's were now added several Inde- 
pendent Ministers, " of whom the chief were Mr. Thomas Goodwin, President of 
Magd. Coll. commonly called Nine-caps, because having a cold head he was forced 
to wear so many, Mr. Jo. Owen, Mr. Peter French, Mr. Thankful Owen," &c. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 331 

before us the Visitors at our next sitting, after Midsomer next March 26, 

Ififil 

coining, that soe wee may be enabled to give some satisfaction to 
the honorable Committee (for Reformation of the Universitie) con- 
cerning the said businesse. 

Whereas S r Dickins, Fellow of Balioll Colledge, and S r Angell, Sticking and 
Student of Christ Church, did formerly agree togeather for ex- 
change of their places, and that wee the Visitors did then agree 
thereunto, but now upon better consideration of the matter and 
finding divers inconveniences will ensue which then we foresaw (p. 350.) 
not : Wee thinke fitt and soe Order that the said S r Dickins shall 
be re-established in his Fellowship in Balioll Colledge, and the 
said Mr. Angell in his Student's place in Christ Church as formerly. 
And wee hereby desire the Sub-deane of Christ Church to restore 
the said S r Angell, and also the Master or Vice-gerent of Balioll 
Colledge to restore the said S r Dickins accordingly. 

Upon the Petition of Mr. Bogan, Fellow of Corpus Christi Col- March 26, 
ledge, setting forth that there are some dues unto him yet unpaid Mr B ogan O f 
in the said Colledge : Wee doe hereby Order : That the said Mr. C: C: C: 
Bogan shall receave the moneyes soe due unto him, that is to say 
both for corne rent and dyett, for all the tyme that hee was absent 
from Corpus Christi day untill his retourne to the Colledge. And 
wee hereby enjoyne the present Bursars in the said Colledge forth- 
with to make payment hereof, or els to shew cause to the Visitors 
(this day) to the contrary. 

Whereas it hath beene certified to us that Mr. William Parsons, March 26, 

1 fi^il 
Fellow of Corpus Christi Colledge, hath officiated at Twyford ' f 

Church, in the county of Bucks, about a quarter of a yeare now Corpus Christi 
last past, and in regard it is desired that the said Mr. Parsons may 
continue soe to officiate and serve the cure there some further tyme : 
It is hereby Ordered : That the said Mr. Parsons shall have liberty 
for absence from the Colledge (for the purpose aforesaid) for one 
halfe yeare from this tyme, and shall have and enjoy the whole 



332 



THE VISITORS REGISTER. 



Mar. 26, 1651. bcnefitt of his said Fellowshipp as if hee were present in the said 
Coll edge: 



March 27, 
1651. 



Whereas there hath beene some difference betweene the Prin- 
cipall and Fellows of Jesus Colledge concerning demaunds made 

Prmcipall and , ., D . . . . . _, .. , , . 

Fellowes of b y tne " rincipall tor charges in journey es upon Oolledge airaires, 

Jesus Coll. an( j sa l ar i es f or SO me offices in the House, which difference hath 



(P. 351 .) 



March 28th, 
1650. 



beene stated on both sides, and referred to us the Visitors to 
conclude and determine: And upon full hearing of the matter 
wee hereby Order that the Principall of the said Colledge (for his 
journeyes that were excepted against) shall be allowed the summe 
of 401. only. And for his lecture at Wolvercote he shall receave 
(for the tyme he hath taken paines in it) according to the allowance 
of the Founder in that regard. And concerning salaries for the 
places in the House executed by himselfe, wee thinke fitt to cut 
them off wholly. 3 

Att the Committee for Reformation of the Universityes. 

Ordered: That the Visitors of the Universitye of Oxon shall 
not from henceforth preferre any that are actuall Fellowes in any 
Colledges or Halls to Fellowships in other Colledges without 
spetiall direction from the Parliament. 1 * 

Extractum per R: NEEDLER, C: C: 

a This Order predisposes us to think the charges made against Roberts, the 
Principal of Jesus, which were dismissed at a later date (especially as he subsequently 
resigned), had some foundation. It might be expected that this plan of combining 
College offices and College salaries in the hands of the Head of the House would not 
be agreeable to the Fellows who had a right to expect them. The quarrel becomes 
irreconcilable, and takes up many pages of the Register. To do the new comers 
justice this is the only proof afforded by the Register of the many charges of grasping 
after money made by Wood and others. The Colleges being mostly in debt, the 
Heads had often succeded to a damnosa hereditas, and even in this case there was 
probably some slight excuse to be made for Roberts on that ground. 

b The London Committee were quite right in requiring a recurrence as soon as 
possible to a fundamental rule. A College was ever, and is still, a domestic house- 
hold, whose affairs should be kept to itself, though there may be special exceptions 
in cases of necessity. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 333 

[By the Visitors.] 
Whereas the Subwarden and other officers were lately elected in Aprill 10th, 

1 ! " ~ 1 

Alsoules Colledge, and the office of Ryding Bursar a was then ' 
omitted, wee hereby elect and appoynt Mr. Scroope, Fellow of the Kiding Bursar, 
said Colledge, for the said office, who shall receave all the rights, 
profitts, and priviledges belonging thereunto untill the next election. 

[Certificate from the Visitors.] (P. 352.) 

To the right honorable the Committee for Reformation of the fff oth) 
Universityes. 

Whereas wee are required by an Order of this honorable Com- 
mittee, April 4th instant, to certifie the cause of the expulsion of 
Mr. Poore, late Fellow of Bayly Colledg in Oxon: Wee the Visitors Mr. Poore, of 
hereby humbly certifie: That the said Mr. Poore was removed from 
his Fellowship in the said Colledg July 25th, 1650, upon certaine 
Articles of misdemeanors and scandall proved against him upon oath : 
A coppie whereof is hereunto annexed. 

Whereas wee formerly Ordered (upon grounds then alledged), Aprill 10th, 
That S r Sayer of Corpus Christi Colledge should be admitted gr ga 
Fellow in the said Colledge : Wee now understanding that the same admitted, 
is not as yet dorfne, and taking into consideration the good 
deserts of the said S r Sayer, and that hee was senior in the said 
Colledge to S r Lane and Probationer before him (to whom wee 
have shew'd the like favor), wee therefore thinke fittt and soe 
(againe) Order that the said S r Sayer be forthwith admitted Fellow 
in the said Colledg, by the President himselfe alone in like manner 
with S r Lane : And that hee receave all the rights and profitts 
of his Fellowship from the date of our former Order. 

Whereas there are yearely certain dividents among the Rector Aprill loth, 

and Fellowes of Lincolne Colledo-e: Wee do hereby order that in 

DiTidents hi 

" This office is still preserved, though its meaning has passed away with the fine I 7 " 100106 Col- 
supply of College horses which once filled the stables of All Souls. 



334 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



April 10, 1651. case an y differences shall hereafter arise amongst the Fellowes of 
the said Colledg concerning such dividents as are to be made in 
the House, any three of us the Visitors resident in Oxon shall heare 
and determyne the same. 
Present of the Visitors: 

The Governor. Dr. Rogers. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Appletree. 

Dr. Wilkinson. 



Aprill 18th, 
1651. 

(P. 353.) 

Fellowes of 
Merton Col- 
ledge to 
receave 
dividends. 



Aprill 18th, 
1651. 



Coll. 



Whereas S r Cripps, S r Maund, S r Hully, S r Pavier, S r Hurst, 
and S r Willowby, Fellowes of Merton Colledge in Oxon, were to 
receave all dividents in the said Colledge of leases sealed from the 
12th of November, 1650, according to our Order of Jan: 15th last 
past: Wee being now informed that the said Order is not obayed 
in that perticuler, and that their intrest is denyed in Widdow 
Pawlin's Lease, of which wee have receaved satisfaction that the 
same is due unto them, and also in some leases of S r John Jacobs: 
Wee therefore Order : That the Subwarden (or those whom it shall 
concerne) shall forthwith make payment of the aforesaid dividents 
to the persons aforementioned, or shew sufficient reasons (to us 
their Visitors at our next sitting) to the contrary. 

Whereas it hath beene made appeare to us that Anthony Palmer, 
late Fellow of Balioll Colledge in Oxon, continued in the said Col- 
^dge one whole yeare after his marriag at our spetiall instance and 
request, that hee might be an assistant unto the Master of the 
House for the tyme being : a in which yeare there were certaine 
dues belonging to his Fellowship in the said Colledge as fines and 
dividents, which are not as yet paid unto him : Wee therefore 
Order : That the now senior Bursar of the said Colledg doe forth- 
with make payment of the same unto S r Dickins, Fellow of the 
said Colledge, for the use of the said Mr. Palmer. 



a An adumbration of the position which was not permitted to married Fellows 
till more than two centuries had passed away. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 335 

Whereas the chamber of Mr. French, late Fellow of Merton 
Colledge in Oxon, is not as yet disposed of: It is ordered that 
Mr. Powell, Fellow of the said Colledge, shall have the key of the Mr. French's 
said chamber in his custody untill further order. Chamber. 

Whereas the Principall and senior Fellowes of Brazennose Col- Aprill 18th, 
ledge in Oxon have agreed to allow unto William Petty, Dr. of p r p ettjr f or 

Physicke and senior Fellow of the said Colledge, to be absent for 2 absence 2 

yeares. 

yeares next ensuing after the 25th of March, 1651 : As also to 

allow unto him after the rate of 301. per annum during the said 
tyme of absence : And have withall testified the consent of all the 
junior Fellowes unto the premisses, provided that the Visitors 
of the Universitye of Oxon should approve thereof: Who being 
moved to that purpose, doe hereby declare their consent, and doe 
likewise order that the said allowance of 301. per annum be duly 
made and paid by the said Colledge unto the said Dr. Petty for the 
aforementioned 2 yeares accordingly.* 

Whereas there are divers publique Lectures and Sermons in April 18, 1651. 

severall churches and chap pells in this Universitie. b not only upon Exercises in 

Coll. changed. 

* An instance of the good sense which has distinguished Oxford from times at 
least as early as when leave of absence was granted to Linacre and his fellows to 
stndy in Italy. Sir William Petty was rightly allowed to pursue his great work in 
Ireland as a Fellow of Brasenose. Such special fitness implies that cases of the sort 
must be strictly exceptional, and only admissible by the consent of a supreme 
authority. For Petty see note to p. 227, Warton's Life of Bathurst, p. 160, Ward's 
Professors of Gresham College, p. 222, and Larcom's Down Survey. He was 
buried in Romsey Abbey, with the plain epitaph: " Here layes Sir William Petty." 

b Wood reckons up seven of these different courses of Lectures and Sermons, viz., 
at Magdalen, Corpus, Christchurch, St. Mary Magdalen (church), Allhallows (All- 
Saints church), and at Dr. Rogers' house in New Inn Lane. He also remarks in 
this place : " So great was the care of these persons for the due and orderly 
keeping of the Lord's Day, that they would suffer no tippling in common houses, 
idling about the streets, walking in the fields, sports, &c., and such like. For if any 
person was guilty of any of these matters he was looked upon as a scandalous 
person and to be avoided " (Annals) a suggestive instance of the way in which 
too lax habits had produced a reaction of somewhat too great strictness; just as 
this again brought about a far worse reaction in the licentious period which fol- 
lowed. ' 



336 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

April 18, 1651. the Lord's Day, but also upon other dayes, at the same houres that 
private prayers (and other collegiate exercises) are appoynted in 
Colledges, so that schollers cannot possibly attend both : It is there- 
fore Ordered, that all Students and Schollers in this Universitye 
shall have liberty to attend the publique duties, and shall be ex- 
cused from the private, at such tymes: But in case it shall appeare 
that any person (under pretence of this liberty) shall neglect both 
the publique and private dutyes, such are left to the censure of the 
(P. 355.) Governors of the respective Houses. And whereas there are divers 
Collegiate exercises on Saturday in the evening and at night, as also 
on Munday morning early, in severall Houses in the Universitye : 
It is Ordered : That the exercises at those tymes shall be changed 
(as shall be thought meete by the Heads of the severall Houses) into 
some more convenient season, that soe the worship of God to be 
performed on the Lord's Day may not be hindered, and that 
Schollers may the more freely and comfortably enjoy the publique 
ordinances on the Lord's Day. Ordered : That our Register deliver 
these Orders to the severall Governors of Colledges and Halls in 
the Universitye. 

May 23, 1651. By the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxford, Die Veneris 

23 Die Maii, 1651. 

Upon information, that there is a great neglect of repairing unto, 
and attending the worship of God in the Chappel of All-Soules: It 
is Ordered, That the Sub-warden be hereby required to looke 
strictly to the better observance thereof in time to come : and that 
he doe from tyme to tyme make return to the Visitors of such 
persons as he shall finde negligent of their duty therein. 

Dr. Lloyd's Whereas Dr. Lloyd, Fellow of All-Soules Colledge, hath borne 
voyd. armes against the Parliament in the late warrs, is a Non-submitter 

to the Visitation by authority of Parliament, besides his total dis- 
continuance from the Colledge for divers yeares past (dureing which 
tyme he hath bin forborn, and hath tasted much of the clemency of 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 337 

the Visitors) : It is now Ordered : That his Fellowshipp be and it May 23, 1651. 
is hereby declared voyd. And whereas there hath bin a dispute 
betweene two severall claymes to Dr. Waynwright's Fellowshipp 
(formerly made voyd by the Visitors): It is this day Ordered: 
That the place of Dr. Lloyd (now made voyd) be disposed of to 
put an end to that controversie : and that Mr. Osborne and Mr. 
Brise do stand, and be received into the places of the said Dr. 
Lloyd and Dr. Waynwright. a 

May 23, 1651. (P. 356.) 

Oxford. 
A Declaration of the Visitors, touching the present estate of g tate of 

the Colledges of Wadham and Trinity. Wadham and 

Trinity. 

Wee the Visitors for regulateing the University of Oxford being 
desired to certifie our judgment of the present state of Wadham 
and Trinitie Colledges, in order to their respective elections, doe 
hereby declare, that wee conceive both the said houses are soe 
reduced as that they are in a fitt capacity to make their owne 
elections in a statutable way. 

Upon occation of the absence of [Ralph] Austen, Register to us 
the Visitors, it is Ordered : That Elisha Coles, of the City of 
Oxford, be, and is hereby appointed (for this tyme) Deputy- Register : 
and to act in this affaire accordingly. 



[From May 23, 1651, to Sept. 20, 1651.] 1 



a It must be admitted that the usefulness of Dr. Lloyd's vacancy, as a means of 
composing the quarrel of the governing authorities, seems to have been the main 
cause of this change in the mode of dealing with him. It was only a few months 
before that his excuses for non-residence had been, however wrongly, accepted. 

b The Visitors and their London censors left Oxford alone during the Long Vaca- 
tion of 1651i On June 13th the Act was held. This was a sign of returning order 
for l< it had not been celebrated for several years." Greenwood, the successor, in 1650, 
CAMD. SOC. 2 X 



338 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Sept. 20, 1651. Whereas there are wrytings, books, and other things of great 

(P. 361.) importance and concernment to Universitie Colledge in the chamber 

Mr Washing- an< ^ study of Mr. Washington deceased, late Fellow of the said 

MI s chamber. of KevnoWs M Vice-Chancellor, is called by Wood elsewhere a " severe and good 

governor, as well of the University as of his College ;" but here he is a " morose 

and peevish person," " a severe and choleric governor," who was forced to " get several 

guards of musketeers of the garrison to awe them at St. Mary's," where (before 

Sheldon built his theatre for the purpose of preventing such unseemly desecration) 

these annual celebrations were held. No doubt the guards were necessary at the 

first revival of the institution (which had always been before, and has been since, the 

occasion of great licence), amidst elements of such serious danger on all sides ; ani 

collisions between them and the undergraduates, who tried to get in without 

" passes," unavoidable. When Dr. Owen presided at a subsequent Act affairs were 

more settled, but he had to make a gallant interference in his own person. See 

Introduction. 

During the Long Vacation Oxford was alarmed by the approach of the young 
King from Scotland. A troop of scholars was raised, and the outworks on the north 
of the city were hastily destroyed, as also the ancient Castle : while New College 
was turned into a fortification. The Castle had only just previously been " made 
impregnable " at a great expense. The picturesque mound in New College gardens 
seems to be the wreck of the tower at that time hastily thrown up. (Annals.) 
This was soon at an end; but the effects of the battle of Worcester were, according 
to Wood, permanently felt not only in the " defacing of all tokens of monarchy in 
the University and City," which could hardly be complained of at the hands of the 
victorious party, but " the defacing also of all monuments of superstition," in which 
were included painted glass in Colledge chapels, Those which had survived the 
zeal of the early Reformers could hardly have been very objectionable. Dr. Bloxam 
believes the destruction of the Magdalen glass to have taken place at this time. 
Canon Henry Wilkinson, of Christchnrch (Long Harry), distinguished himself by 
the fury with which he attacked the painted glass which adorned that institution. 

Greenwood was nominated Vice-Chancellor for the second time, in October of this 
year, by Cromwell. His letter is as follows : 

" Reverend Sirs, 

" Finding it incumbent on mee to nominate a Vice-Chancellor for the Uni- 
ytfrsity, it had somewhile since (in due season) been performed, but that many im- 
portant affairs of the Commonwealth "did interpose in my thoughts. I doe now 
recommend unto you Dr. Daniel Greenwood, Principall of Brazen-nose Colledge 
(who at present exerciseth that office), of whose ability and zeale for Reformation I 
have received abundant testimony, to be Vice-Chancellor for the yeare ensuinge, 
nothing doubting but that hee and you all will soe endeavour the improvement of 
those pnblique ends to which you are design'd, that all of us who are concerned in the 
welfare of the University may in some measure answer the mind and will of him 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 339 

Coll edge: Wee the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon doe Sept. 20, 1651. 

hereby Order that the said chamber and study shall be sealed up 

by Raphe Austen, our Register, who is hereby appoynted and 

authorised to doe the same. And whereas there are too severall 

padlocks upon the doore of the said chamber : It is hereby Ordered : 

that the Bursar of the old Foundation shall have the key of one of 

the locks in his custody, and the Bursar of the new Foundation the ( p - 362 

key of the other: And noe person or persons shall enter into the 

said chamber but by Order of the Visitors, or in the presence of 

two of them at the least.* 

Whereas Mr. Clifford, Master of Arts and Fellow of Exeter Oct. l, 1651. 

Colledge, is bound by the Statutes of the said Colledge to take his ^ Cliffo ^ d> 11 
T\ f r> i f T^- r of Exeter Coll. 

Degree of Batchelor of Divinitie within tenne yeares after his 

necessarie regency, and in order thereunto ought to doe his exer- 
cise within foure moneths after the tenne yeares expired: But in 
regard Dr. Hoyle, Dr. of the Chaire, is absent by reason of sicknesse, 
and cannot be here to moderate according to the Statutes in that 
case provided : It is therefore Ordered : That the said Mr. Clifford 
shall be continued in his Fellowship (notwithstanding he take not 
his Degree as aforesaid) untill the tyme of the next Act in this 
Universitie : And hereof the Rector and Fellowes are to take notice. 
Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Greene wood, Vice- Dr. Rogers. 

Chancellor. Dr. Harris. 

S r Nath: Brent. b Mr. French. 

who hath so gratiously continued (with innumerable other mercyes) such advantages 
of piety and literature, and withall satisfye the expectation of the Commonwealth. 
" Sirs, I am your assured Friend and Chancellour, 

" O. CROMWELL." (Reg. Conv. T.) 

Whitehall, Oct. 2." 

a From previous entries we may gather that Washington had been the confidential 
friend and agent of the Visitors in reference to the difficulties of University College. 
Dr. Hoyle, the Master's, absence is accounted for in the next Order by sickness. 

b Brent's^ast signature. 

Neither Peter French, Goodwin, nor Marshall were in the original Commission. 
The latter was the Warden of New Colledge. Goodwin was soon afterwards Presi- 



340 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Oct. 11, 1651. 

(P. 363.) 
Election in 
Magdalen 
Colledge. 



Oct. 27, 1651, 

Mr. Edwards, 
of St. John's 
Coll. 



Oct. 17,1651. 
S r Lane, 
C:C:C: 



Mr. Goodwyne. a 
Mr. French. 
Mr. Marshall.* 



To the end there may be a full libertie of election (in order to a 
more thorough reformation): It is Ordered: That it be left free 
to the President and Fellowes of Magdalen Colledg to elect Fellowes 
and Demyes out of any county pro hac vice : Any clauses in the 
Statutes notwithstanding. 
Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Greenewood (Mr. 

Vice* Chancellor) . 
Dr. Kogers. 

Upon the Petition of Samuel Edwards, Fellow of John Baptists 
Colledge, concerning some dues to him from the House : desiring 
us to heare and examine the businesse, and to determyne the same 
according to equity and justice: Wee appoynt Thursday the 6: of 
November next for hearing the same at Exeter Colledge at 2: of 
the clocke in the afternoone, and desire the President or some of 
the Senior Fellowes to be there present. 

Whereas S r Lane, Bachelor of Arts of Corpus Christ! College 
in Oxon. Scholler in the Oxfordshire place, was by an Order of 
the Visitors bearing date July llth, 1649, elected Fellow into the 
next Fellowship that fell voyd, which was a Wiltshire place : It is 
Ordered (the Oxfordshire Fellowship being now voyd) : That the 
said S r Lane retourne to his owne County in which hee was at 
first placed, according to the intent of the Statute, and the custome 
of the Colledge in the like cases. 
Present of the Visitors: 

Dr. Greenewood, Vice- Dr. Kogers. 
Chancellor. Mr. French. 

Dr. Harris.. Mr. Conant. b 

dent of Magdalen, French Prebendary of Christchurch. French and Goodwin 
represented the Independents. French soon after died, and his widow, Cromwell's 
sister, married Wilkins, Warden of Wadham, who (as Dr. Symons lately did from 
Parliament) obtained a Dispensation from Cromwell to break the College Statutes 
on this head. 

4 See note c on p. 339. 

b This is Conant's first signature as Visitor, just two years after the last signature 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 341 

Upon consideration of the debts of Queenes Colledge in Oxon: Nov. 20, 1651. 
it is Ordered by the Visitors of the said Universitie, that the next ( p - 364 -) 
Fellowship that shall fall voyd in the said Colledge (if the same T* 6 ??* ? el " 

f * to \ lowship in 

happen within the compasse of a yeare from the date hereof) shall Queenes. 

be kept voyd for one yeare next after the vacancy, and the full 
profitts thereof shall be paid by the Bursars towards the discharg of 
the debts of the Colledge accordingly. 

Whereas Busby, Student of Chrsit Church in Oxon: was Dec. 8, 1651. 

formerly removed from his place in the said Colledge, and Mr - Atherton 

Atherton put into his roome, and afterwards the said Busby ch: 

obtayned the favor to be restored againe to his place by the honor- 
able Committee for regulating the University of Oxon, soe that 

now the said Atherton is hereby become a supernumerary 

in the house, which being represented to us by some in behalfe 
of the Colledge, with desire to be eased of the burthen : It is there- 
upon Ordered : That the said Atherton shall be settled in the next 
place that shall be made knowen to us to be voyd in the University 
whereof hee is capable, if hee appeare himselfe fitt and deserving 
in respect of piety and learninge. 

[Certificate by the Visitors.] D ec 31> 1651 

To the Right Honorable the Committee for Reformation New Coll. 

of the Universities. Certificate. 

In obedience to your Order of December 18th instant, directed 
to us the Visitors of the Universitie of Oxon, touching some 
Fellowes of New Colledge abusing themselves by excessive drink- 
ing, to the publique scandall of religion at the last election at Win- 
chester, wee doe humbly certifie : That we accordingly conventcd (p. 365.) 

of Reynolds, whose daughter he had married in August, 1651. He had acknow- 
ledged the Parliamentary Government dc facto when he accepted the Headship of 
his College, alhd may be believed to have very much taken up Reynolds' position 
(excepting that he took the Engagement), and to have been his representative on 
the Visitors' Board, See Introduction. 



342 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Dec. 31, 1G51. soe many of the said Fellowes as wee found upon the place, some 
being absent, others quite departed from the Universitie, and can- 
not find the least inckling from any of them concerning the same, 
who all professe that they know nothing at all of any such dis- 
ordered carriage, much lesse of publique scandall, as the Order 
mentions. 

Feb. 7, 1651. By the Visitors of the University of Oxon. 

For the better earning on of the affaires of Alsoules College in 
Oxon: Wee have nominated and elected the persons hereafter 
mentioned, officers in the said Colledge (to continue in their said 
offices and to receave the profitts and priviledges thereof until the 
next election) , viz. : 

Mr. Barsnett: Sub-warden. 

Mr. Hartford: Senior Bursar. 

Mr. Scroope: Junior Bursar. 

Mr. Hill : Deane of Arts. 

Mr. Millington: Deane of Law. 

And this our Order shall take effect so soone as it is published to 
the Society by the Warden of the said Colledge. 
Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Greenwood Mr. Goodwyn. 

(Mr. Vice-Chancellor). Mr. French. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Conant. 

Dr. Rogers. 

( P. 366.) Feb. 10th, 1651. 

By the Visitors of the University of Oxon. a 

A. Adlard, Upon complaint and prooffe made before us that Mr. Adlard, 

Rob. Whiten- Mr. Edes, and Mr. Whichcote, Fellowes of Lincolne College in 
cote, H. Edes. . 

Oxon, have committed divers misdemeanors, to the disturbance of 

a For this and the following Orders with reference to the delinquent Fellows of 
Lincoln, see Notes below. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 343 

the said Colledge and giving a bad example, and to the dishonor Feb. 7, 1651-2. 
of the University and the reformation thereof, and have offered 
divers abuses to the Rector of the said Colledge, affronting and 
obstructing the Government thereof: By which though we judg 
they deserve expulsion, yet to the intent they might not be cut off 
from all meanes and oportunities of living in the University for the 
following of their studies, which is the maine end of their being 
there: It is Ordered, first: That they shall read the papers of 
acknowledgment given in by themselves under their hands before 
the Visitors, and Rector and Fellowes of the said Colledg, and that 
the said papers shall be registred in the register book both of the 
Visitors and Colledge. 

Secondly : That they shall be and hereby are suspended from all 
votes in the matters and affaires of the Colledge and University, 
and from all offices, both in the Colledge and University for ever. 

Thirdly : That they shall be and hereby are suspended from all 
the profitts of their respective Fellowships for one quarter of a year 
next after the date hereof. 

Fourthly : That they shall be suspended from all fines or profitts 
by the renewing of leases for three quarters of a yeare next after 
the said quarter, in which three quarters of the yeare they shall 
continue in the Colledg, to the intent the Visitors may have an eye 
upon and competent testimonials of their behavior during the said 
tyme. 

Fiftly : That they shall not be restored to the full profitts of their 
Fellowships at the yeare's end, but be utterly expelled, except their 
conversation be such as may approve itselfe to the Visitors. (P. 367.) 

Whereas it is all edged against mee : That I have beene often in Mr. Edes' 
Mr. Whichcott's chamber, and once in Mr. Adlard's, when there ^ c e k n n t wledg " 
have been rude and unbeseeming noises, and that I was therein an 
abetter of the same: And whereas it is likewise alledged against 
mee that I said to the Manciple, aske Mr. Rector whether hee hath 
a mynd to come before the Visitors againe (which are all the per- 



344 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Feb. 7, 1651-2. ticulers which are alledged against me which referr to Mr. Rector) : 
I doe hereby really acknowledg and confesse that I am consciouse 
of and unfainedly sorry for those rude disturbances, incivilities, and 
affronts, and any other miscarriages of myne to Mr. Rector: And 
doe also hartily desire to be unfainedly sensible, that I have brought 
this trouble justly upon myselfe, in not walking soe humbly and 
inoffensively as I ought to have done, and by not keeping a stricter 
watch over my heart and waies. I doe hereby further promise and 
engage to endeavor to give all satisfaction to others that I have 
either in words or actions given any offence unto, and doe from the 
bottome of my heart professe my earnest desire and engage my pro- 
mise for my utmost endeavor to live studiously, peaceably, and amicably 
in the Colledge, and to give Mr. Rector all due respect and observ- 
ance; as also to joyne with him (in my place) to my uttmost to keepe 
up the discipline of the House, and soe to walke for the future that 
I may give noe just occasion of any difference or offence: And this 
I doe here offer, not for forme sake, but out of a reall sence of these 
my miscarriages for the tyme past and my harty desire of reforma- 
tion for the future. And that this may be a further obligation for 
the performance on my part, and assurance to others, I humbly 
desire this may be entred into your Register booke under my owne 
hand. 

I am further hartily sorry for that just cause of offence which I 
gave to this reverend Board the first day of your sitting about this 
businesse, or any tyme since, by any rash, uncivill, or unbeseeming 
expressions, and humbly desire that this may be accepted as satis- 
faction. 

(P. 368.) I desire humbly to be sensible of and to acknowledg that it is 

^k Ad ] a j d ' s just with the Lord, that I having walked soe unevenly before him, 

ment. and soe unsutably to that profession which I make of him, that hee 

should suffer mee to fall into such wayes as brings mee into trouble. 

I desire to be unfainedly sensible that I have beene fur from walking 

soe circumspectly, soe humbly as I ought, that I have soe little 



THE VISITOES' REGISTER. 345 

watched over myne heart and waies, and desire to be throughly Feb. 7, 1651-2. 
sensible, and humbled before the Lord, that I have soe exceedingly 
failed as a man, as a schollar, as a Christian. And, as for my con- 
verse in the Colledge, I am really sorry that I have beene, so apt 
both to give and take offence, and doe really acknowledge that I 
am sensible of my incivilities, miscarriages, and misdemeanors, per- 
ticulerly to Mr. Rector: and doe from myne heart professe my 
desire, and engage my promise, to live studiously and peaceably, 
and to endeavor so to walke that I may give noe just occasion of 
difference or offence. And this (not for forme sake) I professe from 
the bottome of myne heart, and under myne hands. 

Whereas it is alledged against me, and wittnessed against mee, Mr. Which- 
that I said I would appeale from the Visitors to the Committee. I judgment. 
am sorry that such a rash, indiscreet, unbeseeming speech did fall 
from me. Whereas there hath beene rude disturbing noise in my 
chamber unbeseeming a Colledg and those of my profession, which 
was very uncivile and offensive to Mr. Rector, I professe myselfe 
to be very sensible of and hartily sorry for the same, and for all 
other my miscarriages and offences to Mr. Rector or any other, and 
doe engage myselfe for the tyme to come to endeavor to live stu- 
diously, inoffensively, and unblamably in the Colledge. a 

Feb: 10 th , 1651. (P. 369.) 

Whereas Mr. Hichcock, b Fellow of Lincolne Colledge (being Mr. Hichcock. 
called to give information and testimony in a case depending before 
us), behaved himselfe uncivilly and offensively in the businesse: 
Wee therefore adjudg him worthie and doe hereby order that hee 
shall be suspended from his commons and all profitts whatsoever in 
the Cojledge for one moneth from the date hereof: And the Rector 

a The Visitors rejected these abject apologies on the ground that they were not 
made till the " sixth day of our sitting upon this business; when the fears of expulsion 
were upon them: " (see below). 

b For Hitchcock's outrageous conduct on a later occasion, see Annals (1660). 
CAMD. SOC. 2 Y 






346 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

Feb. 7, 1651-2. o f the said Colledge is hereby desired to see this our Order put in 
execution. 

Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Greenewood, Vice-Chancellor. 
Dr. Rogers. Mr. French. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. Goodwyn. 

Dr. Wilkinson. Mr. Conant. 

Feb. 16 th , 1651. Whereas the Statuts of Jesus Colledge in Oxon give power to 
To diminish fae Principall and major part of the Fellowes (togeather with the 
Jesus Coll: consent of the Visitor) to diminish the number of Fellowes and 
Schollers if the Statutable allowances fall short: And whereas it 
appeares that the Statutable allowances of the present number of 
Fellowes and Schollars is farr above the proportion of meanes at 
present enjoyed by the Colledge : a It is therefore hereby Ordered 
that the Principall and Fellowes have leave to diminish the number 
of Fellowes and Schollars as places shall hereafter fall voyd, according 
to the Statute De numero Sociorum si necesse faerit diminuendo : 
And whereas Dr. Mancell, late Principall of Jesus Colledge, detayn- 
eth QOl. of the Colledge reveneues in Carmarthen and Glamorgan- 
shire, and Coll. James Lewis and Thomas Lloyd, gent, detaine 401. 
more of the Colledge lands from the Principall, Fellowes, and Scollars, 
it is desired that some effectuall course may be taken to obtaine the 
said reveneues without the charg of suits in law, being the Colledge 
is not able to undergoe such a burthen. 
Present : 

Mr. Vice-Chancellor. Dr. Wilkinson. 

Dr. Harris. Mr. French. 

Dr. Rogers. Mr. Conant. 

(P. 370.) Whereas it was formerly Ordered by the Honourable Committee 
Febr. 4 th , 1651. for the Reformation of the University of Oxon: That all persons 
* (members of the University of Oxon) refusing to appeare upon 

a This must have been the fault of those who filled up so many places, at a time 
when the College was struggling with heayy debts. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 347 

summons before the Visitors of the said University, or appearing, Feb. 4, 1651-2. 
should not submitt to the Visitation and Reformation thereof, 
should be removed from their places, and expelled from the 
University: And (amongst others) Mr. Boules, late of Pembrooke 
Colledge, refusing to submitt to the Visitation (as appeares by his 
Answeare upon record), and thereupon was formerly removed from 
his Fellowship in the said Colledge and expelled from the said 
University : Wee being now informed that the said Mr. Boules is 
againe retourned to Oxon, to the parish of St. Giles, and takes 
upon him the cure as formerly; we therefore hereby (according to 
the authority given to us) require and command the said Mr. Boules 
to desist from officiating as pastor or minister of the said parish, 
and to depart from the said University as hee will answer the 
contrary at his perill : 

Febr: 19 th , 1651. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Universities : 
Upon reading the humble petition and appeale of Robert Which - 
cotte, Anthony Adlard, and Henry Edes, Masters of Arts and 
Fellowes of Lincolne Colledge in Oxon, setting forth that they 
apprehending themselves greived by a definitive sentence passed (? 371 
upon them the tenth of this moneth by the Visitors of that Univer- 
sity, doe (according to the Ordinance of Parliament of the first of 
May, 1 647) make their applycations to this Committee for remeady 
and redresse : It is Ordered by this Committee : That their case be 
taken into consideration, and that the said Visitors doe send up to 
this Committee on this day seanight an accompt of soe many of the 
crymes and depositions as they shall thinke necessary and convenient, 
and likewise the lawes and Statutes by which they proceeded in 
their sentence. 

[Letter from the Visitors to the Committee.] 
Honored Sir, TLe Visitors' 

In obedience to your Order of the 19 th of this instant, com pt. 
upon the appeale of Mr. Whichcotte, Mr. Edes, and Mr. Adlard, Feb. 26, 1651. 



348 THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 

1651 sf' Fellowes of Lincolne Colledge, requiring us to send you an 

accompt of soe many of the crymes and depositions as wee shall 
thinke necessary and convenient, as likewise the lawes and Statutes 
by which wee proceeded in our sentence: Wee humbly present 
you with the inclosed papers, containing a breife accompt of the 
businesse, such as for the shortnesse of tyme allotted us wee were 
able to give: which we submit to your judgment. Only wee 
crave leave further to offer to your consideration : That before the 
passing of the sentence complayned of wee did seriously weigh, not 
only the substance but also the circumstances and series of the 
whole matter, togeather with their management of it (which are 
better discerneable upon the place then they can be represented at 
(P. 372.) a distance) : and thereupon were fully convinced that it manifestly 
tended to the great dishonor of the University and the Keformation 
thereof by the Parliament (by whose authority the complaynants 
were put into their Fellowships), and to the loosening and enervat- 
ing of all government therein. And because it is likely they will 
urge their sevcrall acknowledgments as a sufficient satisfaction and 
security, wee hould it our dutyes to declare our opinions to the 
contrary, not only because of the nature, tendency, and evill 
examples of the matters charged, but also because they tendred 
them not till the 6 fh day of our sitting upon this businesse (when 
the feares of expulsion were upon them), before which tyme they 
offered nothing df that kind but what was frivolouse, and argued 
neither any sence of their miscariages nor any sincere purpose of 
amendment. 

Sir, we are, 

Your very humble and faithful servants, 
DAN: GREENEWOOD, 
ROBT: HARRIS, 
CHRISTOPHER ROGERS, 
Jo: CONANT, 
PETER FRENCH. 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 349 



Febr: 26 th , 1651. Feb. 26, 

16ol-2. 

At the Committee for Reformation of the Uniuersities. (P. 373.) 

Resolved by this Committee: 

That the Visitors of the University of Oxon doe certifie this 
Committee the answeres and defences made before them by Mr. 
Edes, Mr. Adlard, and Mr. Whichcote respectively to their charges, 
and likewise their whole proceedings in that cause save what is 
already brought in by Dr. Wilkinson. And this certificate to be 
retourned on this day fortnight, on which day the cause is to be 
heard, or els that the said Visitors doe compose the whole matter 
in difference in the meane tyme if they shall thinke fitt. 

At the Committee for the Reformation of the Universityes. March 4 th , 

1651. 
Upon reading the Petition of John Holloway, of Oxon, gent., a (p 374 ) 

Coppie whereof is annext: it is Ordered by this Committee, that it 
be referred to the Visitors of the University of Oxon to consider 
thereof, and to retourne the true state of the case to this Committy 
on this day fortnight, and that then the cause be heard. 



By the Visitors of University of Oxon. March 9 th , 

1651. 
Upon the earnest desires of Mr. Whichcote, Mr. Edes, and Mr. (p. 373.) 

Adlard, Fellowes of Lincolne Colledge, in Oxon, to shew them Mr. Which- 

favor, and for the better satisfaction of all persons: And also upon an^M^ Ad- 8 ' 

their renewed promises and engagements to live hereafter civilly, lard. 

statutably, and religiously in the Colledg and University: It is 

hereby Ordered : That that part of the sentence given against them 

by the Visitors, Febr: 10 th last past, expressed in these words, vizt : 

That they shall be and hereby are suspended from all votes in the 

matters and affaires of the Colledge and University, and from all 

offices both in the Colledge and University for ever, and also that 

part suspending them from fines upon the renewing of leases for 



350 



THE VISITORS' REGISTER. 



Mar. 9, 1651. the 3 quarters of the yeare next after the first quarter, shall be and 
are hereby taken off and remitted. 

(P. 374.) The Letter to the Chaireman of the Committee, March 9 th , 

1651. 

Upon your Order referring it to the Visitors of the University of 
Oxon, either to send up the whole proceedings or els to make an 
end of the businesse of Mr. Whichcote, Mr. Adlard, and Mr. Edes, 
Fellowes of Lincolne Colledge, if they thought fit, the Visitors 
have made the inclosed Order [given above] , which containes the 
utmost that upon, a seriouse consideration and debate of the whole 
businesse might stand with their judgments.* 
Present of the Visitors : 

Dr. Greenewood, Vice-Chancellor. Mr. French. 

Dr. Rogers. Mr. Conant. 

Warden of New Colledge. 



March 15 h , 
1651. 

Case of Mr. 
Hollowav. 



(P. 375.) 



[Certificate from the Visitors.] 

To the honorable Committee for Reformation of the 
Universities. 

In obedience to your Order of March the 4 th instant, wee humbly 
certifie, upon examination of the case of Mr. Holloway, mentioned 
in the said Order, we find that Mr. Holloway did not appeare upon 
the generall summons of the Visitors, that hee saith hee was then 
in the Colledge progresse keeping Courts with Dr. Stringer, who 
executed the place of Warden of Xew Colledge, contrary to an 
expresse Order of the Parliament July 1 st , 1646, and also of an 

a Our sympathies can hardly but be with the Visitors in this matter. The London 
Comm